18

The perception of a pitch is due to the frequency of vibration of the hairs in the cochlea (the spiral-shaped organ in the inner ear), which is, in turn, driven by the vibration of the eardrum. Anything that drives the eardrum at a given frequency, say 440 Hz, will be perceived as the same pitch, regardless of medium. What the medium does affect, however, ...


8

My experience about this: even people without perfect pitch can distinguish between temperaments. As an example, when I play a pipe organ with unequal temperament, some chords sound very pure, without any "beating" effect (mathematically, the ratio between the frequency of the notes are close to the integer fraction defining the intervals, such as ...


7

If you can cause the tympanic membrane of a normal-hearing human to vibrate 440 times per second, they will "hear" the pitch we call A4. So, there are two ways to go with your question. A device that is designed to produce 440 Hz here on Earth is designed to cause normal earth air at normal air pressure to vibrate 440 times per second. In significantly ...


7

One approach may be found in the Implication-Realization Model by Leonard Meyer and Eugene Narmour. In short, there are five proposed governing principles that suggest what listeners expect from a given musical excerpt. How we perceive the music is then based on either the attainment or the denial of the expected events. In other words, a musical excerpt ...


7

There are other questions here that have dealt with this topic. Basically, there are good reasons why historically certain keys sounded different from others, due to the fact that unequal temperaments were more common, and thus some keys would sound more "in-tune" than others. These aspects of tuning often influenced the choices of genres for writing music ...


6

My experience with musicians with perfect pitch (I don't have it myself), is that their pitch sense is 12TET (twelve-tone equal temperament) and in other tuning systems pitches would be identifiable, but "out of tune".


5

There's no evidence that I'm aware of that in an equal temperament world different keys have intrinsically distinct characters, in the sense that Bb major would relate to a different range of emotions than C major. I guess I find it a bit surprising that you find Elfman's statement noteworthy - It seems fairly intuitive that with most people possessing ...


5

Short Answer: Just tap eighth notes throughout the entire subject. You'll find that the G♯ lasts four eighth notes, not three or five. Furthermore, Gould gives slight accents to the first of each slurred two-note grouping; this shows that he's accenting the stronger downbeats as opposed to each upbeat. He's definitely playing it the right way! Long Answer: ...


5

It's going to depend on what else is happening. When there are instruments which can only play in 12tet accompanying the vox, they will sing in 12tet. I reckon they have to! Acapella it's different. The restrictions in the above scenario are lifted, and often singers will revert to just temperament, which will sound more natural and 'in tune'.


5

This doesn't really have anything to do with perfect pitch. Equal vs just temperament is about relative pitch, not absolute. Only in equal temperament does a certain frequency have a unique matching note. If given a frequency you are supposed to tell the note in just temperament, then you would also need the context - and the context is inherently about ...


4

I heard that claim of close similarity to the human voice for so many instruments, that I lost track, whether any one is missing: violin, viola, clarinet, even for an instrument I have never encountered before: Sarangi. Mostly these statements were from players or strong supporters of that instrument, so it is obviously considered a positive or even ...


4

Not in my experience as a music teacher. Perfectly intelligent students, upon being presented with such a cluster, will look at you in incomprehension and/or suggest various different pitches as the tonic.


4

A few years ago I experienced a very strange (to me), and quite frightening disturbance in pitch perception -- one that came out of the blue. Fortunately it was temporary, lasting not much more than 24 hours. This may not apply directly to your situation, but is a possible answer to your question 3 (What other circumstances could affect the perception of the ...


3

Maybe the term you are looking for is body mapping? Body Mapping Body Mapping is the conscious correcting and refining of one’s body map to produce efficient, graceful, and coordinated movement. The body map is one’s self-representation in one’s own brain, one’s assumptions or conception of what one’s body is like, in whole or part. If our representation ...


3

Elfman is both right and wrong. With respect to traditional music, he is very wrong. Suppose an instrument is tuned to a specific key, not with equal temperaments. A tune played in the instrument's key will sound different than the same tune played in a different key. For instance, using the diatonic scale, if an instrument is tuned to the key of "C", the ...


3

I think it is simply related to your hearing (ie not pitch perception). In this case your ability to hear yourself. In this case you haven't mentioned whether your performance was solo or with a group. If it was solo I would say that you have suffered from a temporary hearing loss resulting in the inability to properly hear your violon and thus intonate. ...


3

For the sake on completeness, I will add that the relative speed between the generator of the sound and the observer will change the pitch, due to the Doppler effect.


3

Lets say I play a big chromatic chord (Like a tone cluster) - After hearing that chord, I have a tonic (Fact). My question is - will everybody get the same tonic? No - some chords (like a major triad) do quite strongly point to a single root note (which might then be perceived as a tonic), but others (when you consider the superset of their harmonics) might ...


3

According to Wiki., a one cent change is imperceptible to most humans, so half of that is going to be a pretty accurate parameter change. One semitone (say from E to F, or A to Bb) is easily recognised, but when that interval of a minor second is split into 100 different 'notes', most wouldn't spot note 77 from 78 as being different/out of tune. Halve that ...


3

In equal temperament, the mode impacts the brightness or darkness of the music far more than the key, from lydian on the bright side (it's the cartoon mode, after all!) to phrygian on the dark side. In addition to Tama's excellent answer above on timbres and how they affect brightness, it's also worth considering that before equal temperament, each key did ...


3

When you write a piece in a certain key you're really writing with a tonic note in mind. That is, one note is considered the note on which the piece rests and which all other notes are compared to. Different notes are either higher or lower than each other depending on the instrument's range, the composer's intentions, and the limitations of the player. For ...


3

Not really. Some music theory exchanges the terms high and low as there are instruments with the higher (towards the player's head) strings sounding "lower" musically than the lower (toward the player's feet) strings. The terms flat and sharp don't seem to correspond to either level or acute angular objects. The terms "major" and "...


2

Many people experience keys with more sharps to be "brighter" and keys with more flats to be "darker," as this question discusses. The accepted answer doesn't actually agree with the premise that a key with more sharps is brighter in and of itself - and while you may well be able to find a number of people who perceive things like that, I've not heard of ...


2

You ask about the brightness/darkness of modes from a particular key - all using exactly the same notes, but not in the right order (Eric Morecombe-ish). For starters, bright and dark are somewhat subjective terms in themselves, so it's a difficult question made harder. Taking the Ionian as the basic mode, as is recognised today as the basic major, would ...


2

There is way too much missing to provide a complete answer but I will try and add some guidance from experience. You state that you want random groups of notes to be "meaningful" but can you define a criterion for meaningful (or is that what you want from us). What makes music meaningful in many cultures is rhythm not melody (though both are important). ...


2

This is the question, that I had been asking myself for quite some time, and though I am by no means a professional musician and do NOT have a perfect pitch I still think that the key is to some extent important. I would not argue that a half-tone change will make the music sound different for me, but the large differences will sound differently. The reason ...


2

I think Percy Grainger was perhaps referring to the range of the saxophone. Depending (very often) on gender people's singing voice more than not falls into the alto (like sax/viola) or tenor (sax/cello) range. Wether or not they actually sound the same has to do with the timbral characteristics of the sound spectrum. Personally, I don't really think that ...


2

This is relatively common, and there are a couple of hypotheses: that our cultural listening habits emphasize hearing the highest notes (the "melody," even if it isn't always), that acoustically these higher pitches are inherently louder, and that our musical backgrounds make us more adept at hearing the range in which we spent most of our time. In ...


2

You are right about loud bass notes sounding different to what they are. Whenever I tuned the bottom E by ear prior to a gig (off the 3 treble strings ADG) I would check it by tuner with disappointment that 'my ear was deficient'. What the tuner says is correct pitch (41.2 Hz) always sounded sharp to me, and what my ear said was in tune the technology says ...


1

Let's consider all three one by one. Sequence of tones: have you learned yet about twelve-tone music? Create a twelve-tone row by using each of the twelve chromatic notes within the octave exactly once, with the order arranged such that the sequence does not strike the ear as sounding "tonal." That is, choose the order such that the result doesn't sound ...


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