17

As with most things musical, there's nothing to stop you approaching piano in this way. Let's talk about percussion. There are many percussion instruments that are not drums. Glockenspiels, marimbas, vibraphonii; the list goes on. They do have some percussive aspect to the sound, so you can use them rhythmically. But they also have strong melodic and (in ...


13

It sounds to me like this: So, basically a slow but straightforward 6/8 beat, and then around 6.22, the bassdrum breaks the regular pattern - it comes too soon. I'm not sure if I got the exact timing right but it feels like what I denoted - a "hemiole" - the 3/8ths in the second half of the measure are suddenly divided in 2 equal parts. The hemiole in ...


13

Wagner actually specified in the score for 18 anvils to perform this section. Since the scene is moving down to Nibelheim (and later back up from Nibelheim) where the Nibelungs are hard at work smithing the titular gold, Wagner wanted to represent this sound as accurately as possible. If you're looking for the specific instruments used in this specific ...


12

The primary reason for this difference is in the mechanics of the drums themselves. Snare drums have both top and bottom heads that are usually tuned to a relatively high tension compared with the timpani. Hence, all the notes are extremely staccato and have virtually no sustain to them at all, so it is very difficult to play a note on the drum in the 50 or ...


12

Sites like this always get lots of questions about how to soundproof thin walls, and the answer is always that you can't do much. Soundproofing is achieved by having a lot of mass in the walls (and those foam panels you see in studios are about diffusing reflections, not soundproofing). So this means that you need to look for a house/apartment that's been ...


10

I'm not certain it extends as far as actual music played by actual musicians of any race, creed or colour, but it is a phenomenon of sorts when it comes to the general public. Watch any predominantly white audience clap along to a song & unless the beat is very clearly pointed out to them - a rock song with a snare on the backbeat etc, or the singer ...


9

Your two options really are shaving them down (assuming they aren't dirty with excess mass to begin with) or adding weight--probably with some kind of heavy gum or resin either near the center or edge of the crotale. I would first recommend analyzing the actual pitch of each crotale using a tuner, or if possible a musical spectrum analyzer so you can see ...


9

There are many differences, both in pitch and timbre. I've seen triangles used with a 10" side length down to 4", and you can purchase them made out of a variety of different materials and construction methods. Some pieces even call for three different triangles of different pitch. So no, there's no defined standard pitch. A percussionist just chooses the ...


9

This instrument is specifically a ganzá [gahn-ZAH], a kind of shaker of African origins and very common in Brazil. It is fairly inexpensive and can be easily found at music instrument stores around the world. You can ghetto-replicate its sound by putting some small pebbles or large-grained sand into any Aluminium canister (cocktail shakers make for a very ...


9

It sounds like a small hammer hammering on metal. Good ear; while Wagner originally called for anvils, modern productions use metal hammers on heavy pieces of scrap metal to create this effect. Here's the Victoria Symphony, using I-beams and manhole covers, and the Halle Symphony using steel plates and I-beams. I once played with a group that used brake ...


8

If you're just looking for more rudiment-type patterns to practice, the 40 standard rudiments are only the beginning. There are literally thousands of potential new licks and patterns, many of which elaborate on the original 40. These are often referred to as 'Hybrid Rudiments', to emphasize that they combine and extend the traditional 40. This list of 128 ...


8

I've done this repair several times to the pieces in my maraca collection. I collect the gourd maracas, but gig with synthetic or rawhide. You have two dissimilar surfaces. Close, but not the same. Regular white glue has a lot of water, and the gourd surface of the maraca will want to soak up the water in the glue. I like the yellow carpenters glue. Here ...


8

Simply put, the answer is because of the influence of West African music on "Western" musical traditions. If western Europe is the mother of harmony, west Africa is the mother of rhythm. Is that a trite oversimplification? Of course, but it's a meaningful start. By analogy, it's fair to say that with the introduction of European music to much of the ...


8

The basic rule is not to write a note which "crosses" the mid point of a bar in 4/4. Either of your bars 3 and 4 are OK, and 3 is usually easier to read. One exception to the "don't cross the mid point" rule is if the whole bar is syncopated, like the last bar in the example below.


7

Simple answer - they just count, as they do in any song. But here, they may count 1,2 -1,2 - 1,2 - 1,2,3 - 1,2. If the beat is slower, they may count 123,456 - 123,456 - 123,456,789 - 123,456 for each of the quavers (1/8 notes). The pulse is followed in that all quavers are the same length, so the count will be steady.


7

There are some things that will make you lose less: a big revelation for me was when I realized I was using way more bow and force than necessary. A combination of weight (literal weight, let gravity do more of the work than muscle) and a slow stroke using minimal bow length helped a lot. Also, the examples here are amplified; if possible, practice the ...


7

My answer will largely contain excerpts from Robert Breithaupt's book "The Complete Percussionist." The Cross Grip is derived by crossing a second mallet over a single mallet, held in a traditional style. This grip creates stability within the grip, but does not provide for the independent control of the mallets needed for much advanced marimba literature. ...


7

Supposing the time signature is 4/4 (common time), the rhythm you have underlined sounds like this (where a beat in bold means a note you hit). 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & | 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & Yes, I know it is an irregular beat but is probably typical of the conga music you play. Do let me know if you need any more help!


7

Your basic premise is skewed. You've heard that the piano is a percussion instrument. It can be classed as such, because the sound is produced by hitting. Hitting strings with hammers that are activated by pressing keys. You've heard that percussion instruments are mainly drums and such like, all of which can be hit to produce sound. You've put two and two ...


7

If I understand you right, mathematicians and scientists call that the period. If some thing (such as a drum line) consists of a pattern which repeats in a cycle, then the length of that pattern is the period. So, for example: KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK ... - The period of this drum line is 1 beat. kick SNARE kick SNARE kick SNARE kick SNARE .....


6

Yes, drilling the end of each crack will stop it from spreading. As far as bent cymbals go, simply hammering it back will cause additional tonal change (an possibly cause a crack, or section to chip off). It is possible to repair the shape, but the sound will never be the same. If you have access to vice-grip or a table vice, I would recommend the ...


6

TL;DR: If you are a beginner, your teacher will probably ask you to get a practice-pad and some drum sticks. If you are just starting as a percussionist, you will first need to learn basic rudiments, which will allow you to play a range of percussion instruments, and then specialise at some instruments if you wish to (unless you are starting to learn a very ...


6

From: http://www.vibesworkshop.com/forum/tuning-vibraphone-bars-442hz-440hz/karl-ivar/041610 This is an interesting topic and one that definitely matters to professional level vibraphone players. I have struggled with this for decades. In the USA 440 is the norm, in Europe and Japan and South America it is 442, although I run into instances of 440 even in ...


6

It is a whirly tube, corrugaphone, lasso d'amore or bloogle resonator. To be honest, I was not expecting my search for "whirly music tube" to come straight back like that :o) If you Google "buy whirly tube" you'll get a fair few hits. I'm not going to link them as I have no idea how good any of the sites are. In my opinion, "Bloogle Resonator" should be ...


6

It falls into the large family of 'shakers'. 'A rainstick is a long, hollow tube partially filled with small pebbles or beans that has small pins or thorns arranged helically on its inside surface. When the stick is upended, the pebbles fall to the other end of the tube, making a sound reminiscent of rain falling.' If you feel your instrument matches that ...


6

This answer is pretty lame, and I don't like mneumonics, but... Drop the "phone" then... xylo glock... (too long) marim... vibra The first two have an "O" in their name, but not the other two. Those two DON'T have resonators. xyl-O-phone gl-O-ckenspiel The second two have "A" in their names and "R" too, but not the other two. Those are the two with ...


6

The 'rule' about not crossing the centre of 4/4 time is an old one, but a good one nevertheless. It makes reading easier - which after all is what writing music out should be about. Personally, i'm happier reading things like this with ties, where it can be seen simply that there's syncopation. However - since the sound of drums generally don't have any or ...


6

One good substitute for an anvil that I have found is the "double-shoulder railroad tie plate": (image source) If you're a little resourceful, you can find these discarded by the hundreds near old rail lines. Clean up the rust and paint it if you like. Put it on a firm support resting on the shoulders (i.e., upside-down). You can control the amount of "...


5

Based on what you've given us to go on, the instrument with the resonant frequency of this cave you visit would be an identical cave. :-) Before you start thinking about instruments, materials, or tuning, you need some ballpark as to what this resonant frequency actually is. The most reliable way to determine this would be to bring a tone generator (like a ...


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