44

Absolutely. Nobody ever expects (extreme case) Itzhak Perlman to stand. Personally, I'd be a happy audience if a flautist sat on a barstool, as many guitarists tend to do. Now, performing while on a unicycle...


38

For some reason, practice isn't always enough for prepare us for a performance. That's not unusual. Some things that have helped me and others I've talked to include: "Practice" performing in situations that are less high pressure. Singing karaoke at a small bar or taking an improv class are examples. Meditation and/or visualization on a regular basis can ...


33

Well pretty much anything can be played as a performance piece but many of them would be very dull to listen to. Personally I find Hanon extremely boring and I believe many other people do too. Czerny less so but still there is not enough in most of them to make then sufficiently interesting for the listener in a concert setting. Having said that there is ...


30

I've never seen a flutist sit, but I've also not seen very many flute soloists. What I have seen is plenty of soloists that do sit, so you'd be in good company! And keep in mind that cellists, pianists, harpists, tubists, etc. sit. Why should you feel out of place for sitting? Do whatever helps you perform the best!


20

Dealing with pressure Get a sound recorder or use your phone and record your performances. The extra pressure of recording yourself will cause similar pressure to an actual performance. Also practise occasionally with a metronome - once again, the pressure of having to keep a strict tempo will distract you. You may be surprised that your tempo is off, ...


16

I have taken a few works from Czerny, slowed them down and played them as prelude pieces in church. One day a woman commented how gorgeous a piece was that I played and I told her it was by Czerny. She immediately called a meeting of the liturgy committee and had a bylaw drawn up stating that the organist shall NOT PLAY FINGER EXERCISES for worship and ...


16

A good practice exercise I've found to help with this is to play along to a metronome and not play every other bar. For example, play bar 1, then sit in silence for bar 2 whilst imagining the sound in your head, then play bar 3, silence bar 4, play bar 5, etc. Once you have done this a few times the next exercise would be to silence bar 1, play bar 2, ...


16

Orchestral flautists sit the whole time so it's clearly possible to play the flute to a high standard while sitting. It's the 21st century and people are used to legislation that requires employers to make reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities. This doesn't sound like an employment situation but the same principles and expectations apply. ...


13

This actually happens more than you might think. If you Google it you might be surprised by how many results you can find. The reason is usually to do with the overall standard of the competitors. In these prestigious competitions they don't just give the first prize to the one judged to be the best: they also have to show sufficient talent to be ...


12

Performing technically demanding music requires a great deal of cognitive effort. The motor cortex, which you obviously need to physically play an instrument, is no small part of that. That some musicians lose direct control of things like facial expressions is no surprise. It’s the same as when you do any intense and consuming task and mindlessly chew on a ...


10

Musically, it is important to be aware of what you are doing that helps to create that emotion. What notes are you emphasizing? Where are your crescendos, decrescendos, accelerations and ritards? What dynamics are you using and where? If you do not know how you want all this to be shaped, it will be a crap shoot whether or not you will get the expression you ...


9

What has been told to me by PR people at record companies is this: gig, and get a following. The best thing you can do is start where you are, do your best, and keep plugging away. There is no guarantee that this will get you famous, but it is unlikely to happen any other way. At the very least, you will continue to hone your skills and get better as a ...


9

I highly recommend the book "Effortless Mastery" by Kenny Werner. The book deals a lot with the anxieties of a musician and how to handle them. Part of the book involves training one's brain to go into "the zone" quickly. Werner introduces the reader to something similar to mindfulness, which involves short periods of meditation in order to get into "the ...


8

Mistakes are inevitable. Learning to play through mistakes is its own skill, one that has to be learned. The technique for learning to play through mistakes is different than the technique for learning to play a piece. I've learned two ways to practice a piece: Practicing for perfection, and practicing to perform. They compliment each other, but are done ...


8

If you were performing in an ensemble of 3 or more people - a flute quartet for example - you would not think twice would you; you would always sit. So its not really an unusual way to perform. And even if it were you are still free to do whatever you need to feel comfortable and perform at your best. So go for it, and good luck with the performance


7

The word etude means study. Most were composed for specific techniques formerly on harpsichord, then, when piano made its debut, for all the new techniques that were available. Czerny, Cramer, Bertini were prolific for the piano, Kreutzer and Rode for violin. Chopin and Debussy took this writing to a different level, with their Etudes de Concert, and ...


7

It's always acceptable to be seated. Standing is more conventional for a single soloist, but a group of performers would be seated. The only advantage of standing would be diaphragm and breath control. That isn't an insurmountable obstacle whilst playing.


7

This is an interesting question. Before finishing the entire description I would have opted for your technique is not up to par and you are getting fatigued. However, you point out that this does not bother you at home and that it starts right away on stage (after the first pinch). If this is solely a performance anxiety issue it's probably psychological. ...


6

Some people put these faces on for show. Some people (myself included) unconsciously make odd facial twitches when playing anything challenging or unfamiliar, or just naturally as we play. Personally I know my mouth twitches when I'm playing something complicated that I don't have committed to muscle memory, but when I know something off by heart (even if it'...


6

Unfortunately there is no correct answer to this. Every possible route may work, or may not. Many gig for years and never get a bigger audience than 20 in a bar. Others are spotted and make it big instantly. The first of those two options is by far the most likely. The problem with programmes like the "...has got talent" ones is that they have set false ...


5

Using a third channel as a loop bed to be used as a foundation for decks 1 & 2 transitions is not uncommon. The fluid transitions are the result of EQ mixing. Which can be done by gradually cutting out the mid band on a 3 or 4 band mixer from the playing track and gradually bringing in the mid band from the incoming track. There are other aspects of ...


5

You've already started the journey down the road. Being involved in many different performance situations. It's a sort of advertising. People are out there looking for talent, so the more exposure you get the better the chance of being taken on. Hone your musicianship. Know what you're talking about. Be able to say which key you prefer to sing a particular ...


5

There is a difference between practicing for performing and practicing for practicing. When you practice, do you experience that the first play-through is worse than the second or third? When you practice, do you keep playing the same piece or part of the piece over and over again? If that is the case, you are practicing to improve practicing. You don't ...


5

Given what you've said about that piece being a favorite, and one you've played many times over many years, I think it's fairly clear the issue is not one of not spending enough time on rote memorization. In the past, while performing or speaking publicly, I struggled with a tendency to completely lose the flow of something that I supposedly had memorized ...


5

When I was playing (and I'm older than you are), allowances were always made for medical situations. I never saw any of my fellow flutists standing and playing with crutches. But be careful. One of the reasons to stand includes the fact that it's simply better for breath control—and the flute uses more air than any orchestral instrument except for the tuba. ...


5

This is always a tough situation, but it is definitely something pro musicians will have to deal with at some point. A friend of mine once pointed out several instances of the beat getting flipped during some classic jazz recordings. I can't remember them specifically, but the recordings included some of the best jazz musicians ever, like Thelonius Monk and ...


4

The nicknames are all inauthentic. They were invented by different people at different times, and not all of them are even "standardized" everywhere. For instance, the only name (except for the obvious technical terms like "thirds") that is well-known in my language is "revolutionary".


4

Start a YouTube channel. This has several advantages: You'll get hard feedback in the number of views. There is a big difference between local gigs where all your friends and family show up and strangers on the internet liking your music. You will see what works and what doesn't and you can try to iterate on that. You can put a lot of work into making ...


4

The short answer is yes, it can. A better question is "Is this a good idea?", and only you can answer that. Try recording yourself playing the study and listen back to it, perhaps back-to-back with some other piano music you enjoy listening to. If you find it horribly dull, or much less enjoyable than the others, perhaps don't play it as part of a ...


4

Flautists love to sway around as they play; it’s rare to see a flautist not do that. It causes uneven volume and, when they move past the mic, phase problems. I used to use a small diaphragm condenser mic and ask them not to move. That makes musicians nervous, impedes their performance, and they do it anyway. The best solution I’ve found is a mic intended ...


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