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It's going to vary quite a bit, and depend mostly on two variables: individual stamina and the method of sound production. I'm primarily a guitarist. If I've been playing for five hours and I have to play a song that has a very high note, fatigue isn't really going to hinder me. But the trumpet player on the same gig may struggle, as he or she has been ...


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It varies from person to person. Factors are health, environment, ergonomics, technique, diet, sleep . . . A pianist with an ergonomic technique will not tire because gravity does all the work. All they need is proper alignment and they can endure for a long time. Gravity will keep them relaxed. It is called resting up. I once played two fourteen hour ...


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I could say a character wakes up sad one day but knows music cheers him up, so he takes out the instruments and plays until he gets tired, and the question would be how much time has passed before the next scene occurs The answer is another question: "How long is a piece of string?" To make it clear let me change the subject in your question from ...


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A system I used for years had my tech building hookup cables to length, allowing for a little slack at the ends and then bundling them together to make a home-made snake. This works for a stage set-up that is the same each night, even if the venue changes. It helps to keep the stage floor cleaner, less cluttered, and reduces the chances of tripping over ...


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Use spiral wrap to keep all cables that go to and from the same places. That way, since you probably set up the same each time, there will only be 3 or 4 'separate' cable runs. You can also use spiral wrap to allow a cable to poke out at any convenient point. A Snake may do the job with a bit of adaptation - change some of the plugs. Often the wires ...


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Learn how to wrap cables. You will find many instructional videos, e.g.: Use Velcro cable ties to keep the coiled cables in place.


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