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Watch an established string quartet start a piece. They breathe together, give each other a sort of mutual upbeat... Or maybe the first violin (or whoever carries the main opening melody) 'leads' a bit more blatantly. In a larger orchestra (whatever its Socialist philosophy) someone - generally the concertmaster - HAS to lead. In effect he becomes the ...


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Particularly in a large ensemble or when a performance occurs in a highly reverberant space, the conductor is especially helpful in keeping the ensemble together. Sound from one part of an orchestra or choir can reach other parts of the orchestra or choir at different times -- enough so to throw off the timing or at least create confusion or uncertainty. The ...


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It depends on the size of the ensemble and the level of their playing and the quality of the conductor but mostly on the type of music being played. It's impossible to generalize, but the worst case result could be that the concert would be impossible to perform. The best case result would be if the concert sounded better without the conductor. Or the result ...


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Terminology is the beginning of theory so I'd say these are the same discipline. A good series is, Master Theory Book by Charles S Peters and Paul V. Yoder Vol. 1 - 6 These are short, easy to read, and well written. Vol 1 - 3 are basic theory and 4 - 6 harmony. The harmony books do not have great exercises. For Harmony I prefer Cheyette and Paulson. If ...


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If I want to look up a question about scales or keyboard or music symbols I type in google the word e.g. piano, keyboard, music clef or the song title e.g.Summertime + Gershwin and then I look up Images and scroll all the pictures through. From there I find the link to the source of this picture and a lot of new information. It took a long time until I've ...


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Read a good book. I started with Learning to Read Music by Peter Nickol. Then The AB Guide to Music Theory Part 1 and First Steps in Music Theory Grades 1 to 5 by Eric Taylor, both published by the ABRSM. If you're planning to do the ABRSM grades, then the Eric Taylor books match the exams. Otherwise, they aren't very reader-friendly, and can be ignored.


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Using mic, guitar and any other audio inputs, you'll need a mixer with at least 4 inputs. That will go into either an amp then speakers, or straight into powered speakers. Using powered speakers, you'll need not only the cable out from mixer, but also mains to each cabinet. Or, use a mixer-amp., which is as the name suggests, both in the same box, requiring ...


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