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5

I don't think you're missing anything! But you might be assuming that "chord succession" and "chord progression" are mutually exclusive, which they aren't. These musical phrases can include both; it's not always just one or the other. The first example has both a chord succession and a chord progression into its own predominant of ii6. So you're correct: ...


5

Sol Sol Sol Me.... Fa Fa Fa Re.... Those four notes are exceedingly boring. But just have a listen to Beethoven's 5th symphony! The first movement is built almost entirely off of this motif, and it is far from boring. As a matter of fact, this motif comes back throughout the entire symphony (the third movement's "Duh duh duh duh, duh duh duh duh, duh duh ...


5

As with a lot questions on this site, it's a matter of scope: what genre are you talking about? I'll give the perspective from the common-practice period (what most call "classical" music). It was most famously put forward by William Rothstein in his book Phrase Rhythm in Tonal Music: If there is no cadence, there is no phrase. As such, the ...


4

In some styles of music, music is always or usually divided up into phrases, and these phrases are marked by cadences In many styles of music, the music can be well conceived of thinking about "phrases", but these phrases are not necessarily marked by a harmonic cadence, but by something rhythmic, the melodic shape, or something else. This may include a ...


3

Harmonically it's an extended final tonic chord. Melodically, the accompaniment figure continues, there's a final echo of one of the melodic cells that's been used throughout the piece. You could just about label it as a 'codetta' if you wanted to.


3

As other answers have already stated, the F is in fact a passing down between the E♭ and G. Calling this an E♭2 chord or anything like it would be very seriously misguided, in my opinion. As for phrase lengths, I would say that this entire excerpt is a single phrase. That's because this is a very clear example, as you wondered, of what we call a "...


3

The first thing you must internalize is there are no rules! You will notice this is widely said in this website. So, answering you last question, it is totally a matter of choice or style. Melodies can be created in various ways, and I'm sure most of the times not by applying any formulas. I think you should interpret those books and teachings as guidance ...


3

Not to belabor the point but... There are no rules, and... You don't have to do anything. Having said that, the motif approach can be very powerful. The point is that complex ideas are built from simple ideas repeated. Repetition is a common theme in music, art, dance, comedy, architecture, etc. It can be compared to a fractal, a large and complex "...


2

This article on auditory time-interval perception suggests that the differences in perceivable time suffer from misestimations depending on the length of the sounds, such that shorter sounds suffer from greater degrees of misperception than longer ones, so the number of ms difference shifts as the overall note duration shifts.


2

Motif and phrase-based melodies will have different qualities, so you need to consider how you want it performed. A phrase-based melody will, by nature, have a more cantabile quality to it, but it is impossible to play the motif from Beethoven's 5th cantabile without it sounding like a silly caricature. When choosing how to approach writing your piece, you ...


2

You don't HAVE to do anything. But if we're thinking 'melody', it's very likely there will be repetitions, inversions, modifications etc. of some melodic element. You could almost say it's what makes a series of notes BE a melody. There are other ways to make a song hang together. But I can't think of any that don't involve repetition/modification of ...


2

How about if you compared it to a "12-bar blues"? This is a common form with a fixed pattern [though with a billion variations]. It was the simple building block upon which all "Rock & Roll" was constructed, though it has many more forms that that. 4 bars of root chord, 2 bars of the 4th, 2 bars of the root 1 bar of the 5th, one bar of the 4th, 1 bar ...


2

(This is supposed to be a comment!) Maybe these scores you present are transcriptions of mensural notation, which allowed for a special notation for ligatures in vocal music. Brackets above the notes are used to represent ligatures in transcriptions of mensural notation to modern notation. You may find many details on the transcription of mensural notation ...


2

The F is a passing tone and don’t have to be harmonized (and not further analyzed). An anticipation would mean an element of a succeeding chord as the example the do of the tonic when we are still in the dominant: ti_do do (V - I) re_do do as the 16th note before the final Eb. As the harmony in the left hand consists only of whole and half notes you can ...


2

I would say that the F in the first measure is a passing tone to the G. You call also call it an Eb9 chord, which the 9 would be considered a color tone, but I don't know if that would really be common practice. Also, I would say that they are 2 bar phrases. If I was playing it I would think 2 bar phrases when deciding how to shape the music.


2

These bars are similar to the “final group” like the ending of many sonatas, symphonies, solos, quartets (normally there are only final chords of quarter or eighth notes). Consider them as a rhythmic fermata. These bars don’t belong to a phrase. It’s up to the composer (or when there is notatet an eye or fermata on the last note it will be up to the ...


1

Less than you might think. Single-figure ms values.


1

The slur in the notation you encountered does not mean legato it's a phrase mark. It's an indication of the composer or the editor that this set of notes should be played staccato but also as a significant whole, for example by varying the volume of the notes in the phrase or by playing (some of) the notes more tenuto. In Romantic repertoire (where this ...


1

Only if you define 'phrase' as 'a section of music leading to a cadence'. In a simple piece like a hymn tune this may be the case. A lot of music is rather more free-ranging.


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