New answers tagged

1

I am a Bass player, and due to an accident I lost my ring finger of my left hand, lost the tendons on the top of my middle finger and deformed my little finger. So I ended up with only one good finger of my left hand and two fingers that hardly work. I still play (have a Fender 1974 Jazz Bass and a 1974 Gibson EB3) and so long as I plan the fingering I play ...


7

An alto (treble) recorder is about one and a half (3/2) times the size of soprano (descant). This means that the 2 spaces (between 3 consecutive holes) on an alto, will be roughly equal to the 3 spaces (between 4 holes) on a soprano. So three fingers on each hand of the alto will need to span a length that 4 fingers would on a soprano. Consequently, you can ...


3

It’s impossible to answer definitely because you’d need to try an instrument to see for yourself if you can cover the holes. There are decent inexpensive plastic recorders available which would enable you to try the compass for yourself, which would be your best option. Whilst tenor and above may be beyond your hand span, many players with smaller hand ...


1

The American Recorder Society (ARS) says: Some players with smaller hands will find starting on the alto difficult. ... However, there are models available from ARS Business Members to help players with small hands avoid fatigue when playing. (From the ARS FAQ page; link added.) In addition to the ARS Business Members, you can try contacting the ...


0

There are general strategies for pianists with smaller hands, and they apply to Bach just as any other composer. In no particular order: Use of pedal; Dropping one or more notes; Adjusting hand/arm/body position; Adjusting fingering, including hand-swapping; Arpeggiation of chords/wide intervals. The particular solution for a particular passage is, of ...


0

As a supplement to @LaurencePayne's answer: For the first chord, have you tried playing both lower notes, the F and G, with your thumb? If not, give it a try; perhaps it will allow you to play as written. Regarding the second chord, dropping the low E is the best option, because that pitch is doubled by the more important E an octave higher.


2

Answer has three parts: 1) Fingering and hand position 2) Practice technique 3) For those who need to drop a note Fingering and hand position Disclaimer: These hand positions are just for this specific chord. Frequent or prolonged stretching and/or twisting risks injury. 1-1-2-3-5 You can tuck your thumb either around or over the Db such that you play both ...


-1

I am 12, with very small octaves, but now I can play octaves with 9 notes, when a year ago, I couldn't do one octave. The best thing to do is buy multiple pencils, and cut them to just the perfect size to where it hurts a little, and bind the pencil to your hand and between your first and fifth finger


1

This arrangement of a Waltz by Shostakovich is a simplification and you are not asked at all to play like it is notated: e.g. you can play the r.h. without octaves. If you play it on a draw bar or a keyboard without sustain function you can play the note B in the last chord of the 2nd phrase with the r.h. between the two F. My advice is to play it as ...


1

This is one reason why every piano has a sustain pedal - the one on the right. Press it when you play the first note in the bar, and keep it down until you play the first note in the next bar. Repeat as needed. Since all the notes in each bar belong to the same harmony (chord) it will sound good, it will flow, and give you chance to move your hand from the ...


5

You can hold the lowest notes -- the dotted half notes -- with the pedal, which will free up your hand to move to the upper chords. Also, in the penultimate bar of your example, you could play both the F and G with your thumb if you can comfortably reach it. Some related questions: Small hand substitutions… any rules? Well-known composers or piano pieces ...


Top 50 recent answers are included