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18

Certainly not the first. The second is unobjectionable. But why not the third? It's the standard notation, and is just fine.


13

You are overthinking this. You are free to use whichever fingers you like when playing a piece but obviously some fingerings will work better than others. What you need to do is to find a fingering that works for you and then try to always do that. Your "muscle memory" will simply work when you have practiced enough. If you find a passage where there are ...


13

He was quite a good player - flamboyant, too. Looking carefully, in the double treble lines, he'd play the chord at the beginning of a bar, then the three quaver chords, come down again for the next octave on beat 3, then go back up again, and so on, all with the r.h. The l.h. is similarly played. There's so much going on, it's better to read (and write) ...


9

We try to find a good fingering - that might mean 'good for YOU' considering your hand size - and stick to it. Not because it's a 'rule', but because it's effecient! You don't want to be hunting for each note every time you play the piece! Let your hands learn where to go, then your playing can become fluent.


8

how can i know the scale ? For example, how to differentiate between C major scale, A minor scale, C ionian scale, E phrygian scale?? All of them are on white keys on piano.!! You need to learn to feel what note is the tonic or 'home note' - the note that the piece of music "pulls towards" or comes "home" to. This sense of coming home can come from various ...


8

All four staffs should be played simultaneously. Both treble staffs are for the right hand, both bass staffs are for the left hand. It’s split up into double staffs just so that it doesn’t get as crowded as it would be on two staffs. This notation is fairly unusual but not exceptional, as a way to write densely-textured sections more readably. Reference ...


7

I'd go with the second or the third, depending on the clef that you need before and after this passage. The first one feels more uncomfortable that the others.


6

You needn't calculate or estimate or do fancy math. Others have measured piano string decay rates, and they're messy: Measurements have been made on a high‐quality spinet piano to determine the initial amplitude and decay characteristics of the principal harmonic components of notes covering the entire scale. Decay rates of individual components varied ...


5

That's a marcato, indicating that this note/chord needs to be played much louder than the surrounding notes, even louder than with a more common sforzando accent (the wedge pointing to the right). (left: marcato, right: sforzando) The upside down version means the same; it's not unheard of that symbols are inverted when used in the bottom half of the score....


4

Any scale is merely a certain group of notes played in ascending/descending order. The major scale is ubiquitous. Pieces using its notes (but not necessarily in that order!) are everywhere. Simply put, the white keys on piano, starting and finishing on C, constitute the C major scale. The spaces between the notes are in a certain pattern. T T S T T T S. ...


4

A lot of music is similar to a journey. It starts at home, and eventually ends up back there. it might visit other placess on the way, but they won't always feel like home, back where the journey started. So, to establish a key, most music will start with the root chord. here are of course anacruces, which are the short starts before the main chord, which ...


4

It's commonly called a roulade, or sometimes fioritura from Italian "flourish." In his later compositions, they're often more elaborate than just a scale. It makes no sense to call it a tuplet, unless it's Ferneyhough or Berio ironically quoting Chopin.


4

Some things can not be practised slowly, and this is one. You can play this Alberti bass slow and soft several different ways, none of which would work to play it fast and soft. You have to start from some method that can play it fast. This is no different from an athlete learning how to do a high jump for example - you can't learn that by walking up to ...


4

Muscle memory and playing by ear are very much related. You probably don't want to just memorize songs or chord progressions because that won't help you in the long run. Instead, try to figure out songs by ear. This is the main exercise, but it gets easier with every song you work on because you're making a link with what you hear to where your fingers go. ...


3

This question has been posed several times, so is probably a duplicate. However, the two instruments are very different, and I feel there's not a huge point trying to tranfer skills from guitar to piano. Of course, the theory used in playing both is very similar, but the execution of it is very different. Generally, 6 is the maximum number of notes ...


3

As a matter of fact, Baroque music does sometimes get a half-bar "out-of-phase" with the barlines. I've addressed this phenomenon in a previous answer here: Can you introduce fugue themes in the middle of a measure? If so, how?. In fact, just last night, I was noticing this happens in the final movement of the 3rd Brandenburg Concerto. After two bars of ...


3

In the Musescore edit view just press "i" to open the "Instruments" dialog. Then you can rearrange the staves.


3

In MuseScore, click 'Show MIDI import'. You'll see that the Left Hand piano stave is above the Right Hand one. Select it, click the down arrow, click Apply. The RH and LH staves will now be the right way round. Or do it in the Instruments page.


3

It's written that way to make it clear there are two parts sharing that note, the melody (D G A ...) and the second part (D). Of course you only play the note once. The second example is notated incorrectly, you need a quarter rest and an eighth rest above each other on the first beat. You would play it as if the melody started on the G.


3

Hard to give advice if you are not telling us what voicings you are currently playing. Practice first your shell voicings: 1 3 7 and 1 7 3. (Low to high). As you stitch chords together try to limit big jumps in the top note. Use your ears and break the rules if it sounds OK to you. So first 4 chords of “all the things you are” (Fm7, Bbm7, Eb7, AbM7, ...) ...


3

I'd guess you're trying to improve readability by reducing the use of ledger lines? below or above? The thing is, the piano is an instrument which is notable for it's range (on paper, a wider range of pitches than a standard orchestra). So pianists have to handle these a lot, and most will be used to reading off either end of the score (depending on their ...


3

As marcelloverylongname commented, this is a run. The notation is easier than trying to notate 29 notes into 5 eighth-notes. ( 6-6-6-6-5 ? ugh) Given that this is in the middle of the piece, in 3/4 time, with only an eighth-note in that bar, you should make the run come more or less close to using up the remainder of the meter in that bar. A ...


3

Yes. As a professional, there's no way one could study on anything but a real piano. A professional pianist masters the instrument in a way that to perform a piece giving it all he/she has in mind, a real piano will be needed, or the desired sound just won't be achieved. That being said, if there are specific circumstances in which a pianist can't gain ...


2

To some extent, it depends on what you can put up with personally. But even if you're OK with how it sounds, there are still a couple reasons why you'd spend money on tuning: You might find you enjoy the sound of the piano more once it's been tuned. A freshly tuned piano will sound clearer and more consistent from key to key. Given that you play it daily,...


2

Hearing bars 13-19 as shifted by half a bar may be due to the prominent low C's on the offbeats. But Bach rarely plays games of rhythmic ambiguity like, say, Beethoven. More important is to preserve the rhythmic structure of the melodic phrases. Bars 1-8 hammer home a phrase that starts just after the downbeat. If you hear the bars as written, then when ...


2

You seem to be asking more than one thing here. I can cite an example right off the bat that is in A min, starts on A min and ends on B maj chord. Luis Millan 6 pavanas and a fantasia (pavan #1). Of course the very next pavan starts on B maj so... CORRECTION: pavan #1 starts on A min and ends on A maj (not B maj). Sorry. You absolutely do not have to ...


2

Think of it this way. You make a journey to somewhere. Ten times, a different way each time. Will you know the way there? Or ten times the same way. Will you then know the way there? Humans often learn by repetition. (Yes, some learn the hard way, but that's their problem!). By repeating the same action, whatever it is becomes ingrained more quickly. So ...


2

From the example given by the OP in comments: If the main accompaniment is gated-reverb percussion and bass, approximate that with unpedaled, nearly staccato, "stride piano" left hand. If the chorus is sung louder than the verses, in the right hand melody, restrict octave doubling to the chorus. Fill in other layers as you can, when either hand has a beat ...


2

Yes, it is fine, to a certain extent. I have been playing piano for over ten years and often I will switch between playing a chord 1-2-5 and 1-3-5, for no particular reason at all. However, like other answers have pointed out, you should still attempt to find the best fingering for yourself, one that is the most natural and comfortable. Occasionally, you ...


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