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24

This does not seem to be a typo, as evidenced by a clear D♭ in the bass on page 14 of the autograph manuscript: On page 14 of Kullak's "instructive edition" found here, the editor suggests fingering the chord 5–3–1 and rolling the chord to get all three pitches:


11

I'm afraid a tendency to work just with 'the changes' and ignore the original melody is endemic in today's jazz world. Particularly if your improvisation technique is based on the chord=scale system. I agree that it's an excellent idea to start of by presenting the original melody. Many players don't. What can I say? You've noticed that your ...


9

Here's another way to view it which might help. Imagine that the music is being by four instruments or voices which can only play one note at a time. Maybe a string quartet or four singers (SATB). Let's imagine a string quartet: violin 1, violin 2, viola, and cello. Each has a part with just one line of your music. Violin 1 has the tune: the top line ...


8

It's in 3/4, and those notes on the treble clef with the tails going down are held for each full bar - all three beats (dotted minims). And because they're also tied to the same notes in the next bar, they get held on for another three beats - six in all. So while you hold those keys down with thumb and index or middle finger, the other fingers of r.h. are ...


7

I won't talk about if it's transcribed correctly or not, because I don't know the piece... However, the part you've mentioned is actually 'only' a 10th. There are a lot of people who can reach a 10th in certain key signatures, me included: This 10th for example is very easy for me to reach, in the key of C I could even get it up to an 11th: If you can't ...


7

There is no rule that says the turn has to go up one whole tone from the note you call the base. It can be a half tone or a whole tone. The turn follows the key signature unless something else is indicated. So in this case what you call the base note is A♯. If you follow the key signature then the next tone up from A♯ is B, so it should be B. And regarding ...


5

In general, these notes with the stems facing the other direction indicated that it's a >second voice< If you have any notation program, just look up how you can change a voice from voice 1 to voice two. This example above is what you will get. It basically just means, that you have to see both voices as an independent (melody) line. Sometimes you're ...


5

The book Bartók's Mikrokosmos: Genesis, Pedagogy, and Style, says the following about it: Ch 6, Nos 18-21: The separating sign | indicates the interruption of legato between phrases. Ch 4, Bartók's definitions about musicianship: Phrasing. Curved (slur marks) are used to indicate legato, and they also mark the phrasing. Legato phrases are not to be ...


5

It happens there because the previous bar isn't in E. The remaining part is, but that bar itself is the V of E, thus B major, leading into the new key. It could have been written as in the new key of E, but as the final part of the last section, it stays in G, complete with necessary accidentals.


5

Firstly, know the geography of the song.Know the song inside out. The chord sequence, the order of verses/choruses/bridges you are going to play. So the accompaniment is semi-automatic. Secondly, play the changes. Stick with the harmony and notes that fit the bars you're on. Don't just play blindly with notes that you think will fit - make them fit. If you ...


5

The hesitations (and the speed) are related to the "legato". It will take time and practice, but eventually you will need to make the left hand "flow" a lot more, there has to be a kind of constant ebb and flow feeling to the left hand. At the moment, each time you play a chord in the left hand, it sounds sort of isolated, like individual stabs coming one ...


4

Stop over-thinking this. You don't have a brain problem! Playing two hands is tricky for a beginner. Practice each hand separately until it's PERFECTLY fluent. Then, try hands together, SLOWLY. It will come.


4

For black keys, 2-4 doesn't stretch too far. Compare it to the runs of parallel diminished fifths in the middle of Chopin's etude Op. 10 #3. (I bet you'll tire sooner from hearing that many parallel perfect fifths than from playing them.)


4

The left hand in this example of piano music should be played with damper pedal held for each chord's duration, typically beats 1 and 2 and then again during beats 3 and 4. Therefore, "note length" isn't a concern. Think of the left hand's physical motion as aiming the fingers at the keys, then rolling the wrist to strike each key with about the same force....


4

You can't study sixteen hours a day. You need to take breaks and do other things. Playing music is a perfect way to take a break. To make any progress you're probably going to need to devote at least half an hour a day to your piano practice, but you can use your study breaks for this. After a couple of hours of study, practice piano for 15 minutes, it will ...


4

Following the hint in Dekkadeci's comment, if this excerpt is from a German publisher, Pw may mean Pedal wieder or Pedal wiederdrücken "pedal again (push)," meaning to momentarily release the pedal. The period after Pw, just like the one after P, suggests an abbreviation of a word. Pw is easier to typeset and easier to read than an asterisk crammed against ...


4

The notated value of grace notes at the end of a trill is conventional, though it is usually approximately correct (e.g. you are more likely to see 32nd-notes in a slow movement than in a fast one). The termination of the trill should be at the same speed as the trill itself. That said, if you can play triplets (or 32-notes as suggested in a comment) for ...


4

This is just an idea, and I can't guarantee that it works for you, but: start from the original melody and its accompanying chords, and then start jazzing it all up more and more, until you think you broke it. Don't jump straight into completely free improvisation, but first make small and then larger and larger changes and variations to the original song's ...


4

I play it 1 2 3 1 2 3 4. Nothing wrong with thumb on a black key if it doesn't twist your hand to get to or from it. That is one way to play it quickly and smoothly. With fingerng, there is hardly a 'right or wrong' way. Whatever suits a player is his 'right' way. The point of scales is merely to impress on the mind the notes used in a particular key - or ...


4

It's not strictly required; that's the composer's way of saying " you may think it would be nice to {crescendo / decrescendo} here, but don't do that" . In some of the solo parts for concerto or sonatas I've played, there are spots where one starts with a pp and may briefly swell, so the composer emphasizes that you need to return to pp (even tho' the ...


3

Many really elementary piano tutors start with the hands playing separately and then add the occasional extra note to make hands play together. What this suggests is that this is a skill that takes time to master. Start slowly with very simple music. Don't expect to be reading/playing fluently after just a few months. You will get there if you take your ...


3

This is commonplace with beginners. Being right-handed probably doesn't help, either! Like lots of things in life, the more times something gets done the easier it becomes. So, dedicate a couple of days a week when you practise to only play left hand notes. Scales and arpeggios are a good warm-up, then play some things you've already learned or looked at, l....


3

I did a PhD in physics while working as a musician (on and off). Though, unlike you, I started in music at age 4. Dropped music school to do physics. I will say that graduate school is very challenging and you will need to make trade offs. A hobby is nice for breaks. I disagree that you cannot study 16 hours a day (it's what we do). But if you start ...


3

As always, talk to an experienced teacher. In many cases, the choice of fingering depends on how you enter or leave that chord in the piece being played. In other cases, there are fingerings which may seem awkward at first but cause much less strain on your fingers or wrists. Avoiding biophysical damage is important!


3

Personally I would avoid Hanon. There are plenty of more interesting etudes and if you do not have a teacher to guide you (because if you did you would just be asking them - wouldn't you!) then there's a chance of going too far too fast, which can be damaging, and also of being bored to death. Lots of other stuff is available, so lets look at Czerny as an ...


3

Because the tempo is very fast, textbook suggestions about the duration of trill notes and terminations may need to be sacrificed for playability. Your write-out is perfectly reasonable and won't sound "square" when played up to tempo. It's unusual for the trill termination notes to be significantly longer than the trill notes, but I've heard it done, ...


3

Interesting. I have just tried this - I was unaware what fingering I use - and I do what you have notated. Okay it depends a bit on hand size but my hands are quite small so I think this fingering would suit many people. So what is the issue that is causing your problem? Well I don't know but I have two suggestions. Firstly (and I'm sorry it's obvious ...


3

The basic problem is dynamics. Your are hammering out all the melody notes and the left hand chords at a uniform "forte". The trick to making piano music sound legato is to match up the loudness at the end of each note, not at the start. The bass notes and chords die away much slower than the melody notes. Also, each chord contains several notes, compared ...


2

Since you can only read the right hand you have to practice more with the left hand. Try difficult passages with just that hand. Only then should you try to play with both hands together. Don't worry, it might take a lot of time before you can sight-read both hands together, but if you persevere you will get there eventually


2

What is a good and efficient way to learn such patterns? Actually, just practice. That's basically all you need to do. You can't expect to be able to play those things overnight, but over time you will get better and better. Remember when you started to play the piano and couldn't even play triads in your left hand while playing with the right hand...? ...


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