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14

This is called a portato marking. In your example, the portato is notated with staccato markings (the dots) along with tenuto markings (the dashes). In addition to this notation, you'll also occasionally find portato notated as staccato notes within a larger slur (instead of including the tenuto markings). For strings, it indicates a slight articulation of ...


14

There are a couple things I would note. Most Classical music is pre-recording technology, so we don't have any recordings of how it would have been played at the time, which would likely be the way the composer would have intended it. Because of this, we have to rely on the notation alone. The older the piece of music, the less standardized the notation ...


13

Can the bass clef be transformed to the treble clef in piano music? Yes but please don't. It seems like it would be much easier to read. No. You will be making Middle C be a line in one staff and a space in the other. Bass cleff continues directly from treble with middle C being the one ledger line between them. Is there a compelling reason not to do ...


11

The piano might not even be playing. If it is, it is indeed probably the best reference. However in other circumstances it is possible that you would play a slightly different pitch for (example) an E natural as the major third on a C chord, compared to the fifth on an A chord. To understand why this is, you need to understand how intervals (like major ...


10

It is common for piano staff to change clefs. There can be passages with both hands playing G clef or passages with both hands playing F clef. You really need to read both clefs, and getting familiar with C clef is a good idea too. Can the bass clef be transformed to the treble clef in piano music? How can you do this with printed music without re-...


10

I am not a great specialist in music notation, but there is something awfully wrong with this piano sheet. For example in the third measure the sum of the values of the notes in treble clef is less than one, whereas in bass clef it is one. The fourth measure where you marked "1" in the bass clef, the sum of the note values is 1 1/4. I have never seen ...


8

The forte symbol: f means "loud", but it doesn't mean just play that note loudly; successive notes after this symbol should also be played loudly, (until another dynamic symbol is encountered). The marcato symbol: ^ means "marked" or accented. This symbol only effects the notes it is on, and successive notes should not be accented. The sforzando symbol: ...


7

Probably a more important factor is your whole body level compared with the height of the keyboard itself. If you sit too low, it will inevitably cause your wrists to be low, as gravity works on your forearms. I encourage sitting so that the elbows are about an inch higher than the top of the white keys. That way, my students can let gravity help with their ...


7

Since generally speaking the bass clef is played with l.h. and treble with r.h., and the hands are different, it makes sense that music for piano is written using both clefs. I imagine nearly all piano players would understand and appreciate that. However, if you wanted to transcribe the bass clef notes so they sat in a treble clef, you could do that. A lot ...


7

If you really want to learn to read bass clef, do the opposite of what you are suggesting. Rewrite the treble clef parts in the bass clef, and learn by total immersion. Any music notation software can do this easily. But spending time playing only the left hand parts of pieces will probably work just as well. Choose pieces where the left hand has plenty of ...


7

You can't READ this page, because the notation is illiterate. All you can do is try to work out what the person who created this mess intended! It's reasonably clear what order the notes come in, and when the RH and LH notes coincide. From there in, you'll have to do some guessing I'm afraid. (later) It seems you know the song. So, using this as a ...


7

As a guitarist, if I'm playing with a pianist, I usually do a couple of things. If I haven't played with them before, I'll usually lay off a bit in order to get a feel for how the pianist wants to approach the comping. I tend to adapt my paying around my bandmates when I'm comping. If the pianist wants to do some complicated rhythmic stuff, I tend to go ...


6

What's really bad technique is having a wrist that stays low below the level of the keys, while you are playing with your fingers. This is a very common beginner mistake that can result in painful wrists and eventually RSI. Don't do this. That's why in the beginning many tutors try to keep the wrists level above the keys. It's a good starting point, but ...


6

This is a good question but I think a hard one to pin down a short answer for. There reason is that there are several things going on in a musician's mind and body during the learning process and performance. First I would say that you want to use muscle memory. And, you do not want to be "thinking" about anything. When you get to that level performance ...


6

Actually the bass clef seamlessly fits below the violin clef, which means, you will recognize a cross-system scale easily. If you are prepared to write all your scores yourself, this may be an option, but fairly few will be able to play from that. The bass clef is not that difficult, and it is worth the effort to learn it.


5

A small amount of mechanical noise is common, and usually easily rectifiable. Probably not worth invoking the warranty on a new piano, though it might be worth contacting the retailer and mentioning it, just to cover yourself. I wouldn't advise trying to lubricate or adjust any moving parts yourself, unless you know what you're doing (and, with respect, ...


5

To be clear, the right hand staff here is actually showing three voices, not two (as implied in the other answer). The bar begins with only two voices. First voice has: Eb-D-C (quarter tied to dotted quarter); the C in this voice is held for the remainder of the bar. Second voice has: 8th rest, 8th rest, F-C, 16th rest, C-F-Ab-F Third voice entrance is ...


5

This question is related to many others about leading tones and equal temperament with good answers and also wikipedia information like this here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_temperament that render excellent explanations with background information so I can give you a short answer without repeating the entire history of music and temperament. It is ...


5

This is really going to depend on the music. For example, if you are playing a first-inversion major chord (for example, you have a G♯ in an E-major chord) then your pitch should be lower than it would otherwise be (assuming that the E and B played by the other strings are in tune with the piano). However, nobody will notice this much unless the chord is ...


4

The root of the question comes from the incorrect assumption that in Beethoven's time (and earlier) the notation for dotted rhythms was performed strictly according to the math. The math was certainly "strict" in the sense of showing the mathematically correct number of beats in the bar, but that was not necessarily how they were played. A single-dotted ...


4

This is a notorious question, and has been asked many times in the last 2 centuries - you are not alone! You're right in suggesting a polyrhythm - 4 against 3. The difficulty is to play it musically. If you play it exactly, I (personally) find the two notes are a bit too close for comfort, so I tend to overdot the top line a bit. It's also important to ...


4

The confusion is caused by at least two reasons: much of performance practice was not notated precisely, and performance practice was not uniform.


4

This is a tough call. Where on the finger board is not really helpful. The bigger issue will be two people comping simultaneously and having the rhythms clash. Do you have a Bass in the group? If not you could always play a sort of walking chord melody bass line in the lower register. That would fill up space and keep the steady groove going and act as ...


3

Somewhat of contradiction in terms, seemingly! Staccato (the dot) meaning to be played fairly short - around half the shown length - while the line means hold the note for at least its full duration! That said, in string playing, there's slight separation of the notes - even more confounding - but I guess this isn't for string playing, even given the '...


3

Your keyboard's built-in metronome ticks faster in 6/8 than 3/4 for the same tempo, because the metronome is probably ticking on eighth notes in 6/8 time and on quarter notes in 3/4 time, but tempo is specified as quarter note "beats" even for 6/8. There are two eighth notes for every quarter note, so you get two metronome ticks per beat. It could also tick ...


3

Don't adjust your pedal technique. The noise could come from the pedal pivot, or the cup connecting the pedal to the pushrod, or one of the pushrod guides, or the pushrod-action joint, all of which are best left to a professional technician to both troubleshoot and correct. The noise could even come from the sole of your shoe on the pedal, or a creaky ...


3

Yes, both 6/8 and 3/4 'add up' to six quavers or three crotchets. The difference is in how they are grouped. The second example is clearly grouped as three groups of two quavers - three crotchet beats. The triplet makes this abundantly clear - attempting to notate the bar as two groups of three quavers each would require re-writing the triplet in a very ...


3

This question becomes very interesting when you start looking at articulation. It is very nice to articulate a fugue subject so that it is more recognizable every time it occurs. The subject of the first fugue of the Toccatta in D Minor (BWV 913) begs to have the first note a tiny bit stacatto. "Deet Dah--- Dah -dah- dah- dah- dah ..." But some entries ...


3

The immediate job of playing THIS piece well ultimately comes down to muscle memory. But learning the piece is a lot quicker when you recognise patterns. Same difference whether they're heard or read. And that's all 'theory' is really - codifying patterns that work.


3

In a well-written duet involving a piano and another instrument (at least IMO), the piano part should sound like it has something missing. Don't worry about the ability of the piano part of a trio to stand alone.


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