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26

Playing a chord lifts the dampers from just the strings of the notes played. Depressing the pedal lifts the dampers from ALL the strings. A lot more resonance. I'm amazed that you can't hear the difference! Maybe you aren't playing a real piano, but a basic-grade electronic imitation that doesn't model this important part of the piano sound?


24

The symbol indicates the chord should be played as a descending arpeggio. Standard convention is to go from low to high, so when the composer wants to go the opposite way, it needs to be clarified.


8

This line refers to the pedal: You are holding the pedal down before, at the triangle you release it and hold it down again for this bar. So, you can use the pedal to hold down the notes you cannot stretch your fingers for.


7

There is sometimes a middle pedal on pianos, called the sostenuto pedal. Its role is to hold only the notes played when it's operated. so here, using that sostenuto pedal, the three semibreves can be held with it, which doesn't affect the other notes. Using the sustain pedal, found on all pianos, will obviously hold the long notes without having to hold ...


6

The notation starting in the second measure, isn't a tie, but rather a slur. More specifically, it's a phrasing slur indicating to play everything within that slur as a continual line and within a single phrase. You only need to play that quarter-note A in the second measure for the duration of one beat. And your intuition regarding the brackets in the ...


6

You're probably running out of voices of polyphony. You haven't clarified what virtual instrument or synthesizer is the sound source, but most of them have some sort of voice limit, ranging from 1 to 128 voices. If you keep the damper pedal down, then voices can get used up very quickly. For most instruments, when the voices are used up and another note is ...


6

One of the most distinctive features of the piano (as opposed to e.g. the harpsichord or the clavichord) is the sympathetic resonance. Whenever you hit one string, all the strings sympathetic to that one (*) will vibrate along with it. Usually the dampers get rid of this resonance immediately, but holding down the damper pedal lets it shine through. Try ...


6

You can get an accurate score here: https://www.mutopiaproject.org/cgibin/piece-info.cgi?id=263 , and you can hear a public domain recorded performance here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Entertainer_(rag) (box on the right). Here's the part you're talking about: The score you're working from is simplified, and in this particular bar it's inaccurate. ...


5

Hardware instruments (e.g. digital pianos) have a limit on the number of simultaneous notes that they can produce - this part of their spec is called "polyphony". As Todd explained, once you exceed the limit, notes start getting cut off. Some instruments try to do this in a clever way, cutting off the least noticeable notes; others are a bit more basic, just ...


5

It's not uncommon for melodies to include notes that aren't in the chord, especially on weak beats of the bar. The article linked is not really a good way to understand popular music or jazz music (and my common practice music theory isn't really good enough to give an appraisal of it's usefulness to analyse classical music in an explanatory way). The ...


5

It happens there because the previous bar isn't in E. The remaining part is, but that bar itself is the V of E, thus B major, leading into the new key. It could have been written as in the new key of E, but as the final part of the last section, it stays in G, complete with necessary accidentals.


4

The author wants to illustrate a suspension with and without decoration. This part: S: 7-(6) 3! in plain English means: `suspension: seventh above will normally resolve to a sixth where the top voice moves down by step and the lower voice doesn't move, but instead it can be "decorated" where the top voice moves down by step and the lower voice moves to a ...


4

People do strange things to the 'Moonlight'. My feeling is that the unifying element is the constant triplets which, while a degree of flexibility is always allowable, should not have their flow BROKEN. Many performers disagree! This version, the first that Google threw up for me, hesitates after each of the dotted quaver-semiquaver pairs. ...


4

If I understand, you do about 2-4 hours each day. That's a lot at the beginning. I think you should carefully gauge the level of pain/fatigue. The general idea is that you should not feel pain. Fatigue is different. Give yourself enough rest to recover from fatigue. If you feel actual pain, I think you should stop and assess what is going on. A while back ...


4

It's in 3/4, and those notes on the treble clef with the tails going down are held for each full bar - all three beats (dotted minims). And because they're also tied to the same notes in the next bar, they get held on for another three beats - six in all. So while you hold those keys down with thumb and index or middle finger, the other fingers of r.h. are ...


3

Internalizing key signatures is one of those skills that get continually better the more you practice it, but it doesn't seem like that while it's happening. In other words, keep playing the pieces you're taking on - you will eventually master all key signatures you've met. Of course, there are any number of resources with pieces that expose you to all ...


3

I've been playing professionally for many years and have always had to look at my hands for stride piano, though that wasn't my specialty. Nevertheless, I have a hard time believing that all but the very best stride pianists must look at their left hands pretty regularly. That being said, when an accomplished jazz pianist I was taking lessons from several ...


3

Don't count too much. Make music! let it flow: The quietest it would sound if you give the 16th note half the value of a triplet eighth. But of course that's not mathematically correct. The exact note value would be 4/12 resp. 3/12t: The triplets each with 4/12 The dotted eighths with 9/12 The 16th with 3/12 So mathematically correct would be, if the ...


3

Here's another way to view it which might help. Imagine that the music is being by four instruments or voices which can only play one note at a time. Maybe a string quartet and four singers (SATB). Let's imagine a string quartet: violin 1, violin 2, viola, and cello. Each has a part with just one line of your music. Violin 1 has the tune: the top line ...


3

In general, these notes with the stems facing the other direction indicated that it's a >second voice< If you have any notation program, just look up how you can change a voice from voice 1 to voice two. This example above is what you will get. It basically just means, that you have to see both voices as an independent (melody) line. Sometimes you're ...


2

Since a Gigue was a dance, and everybody knew what the dance rhythm was, writing 3's on all the triplets was as pointless as writing a modern "swing" rhythm in triplets rather than equal value notes. It's also worth mentioning that on the instrument this was written for, a two-manual harpsichord, Solokov's impressive gymnastics on the piano are irrelevant ...


2

Is it common to combine multiple voices in one piano staff... Yes, but stem directions should be used to indicate separate voices and rests should be used so that each voice has complete rhythm values for a measure. ...that might not even fit the time signature? If the rhythm values for a voice don't fit the measure, that's a notation error. I'll ...


2

My students (and I, for that matter!) play up and down the scales and arpeggios of the key they will play in next. It's sort of 'I'm in key E next, so I need my E hat on' approach. The more you play in different keys, the easier it gets.


2

Don't play the piano too long in the beginning. It's a process of building muscles just like in the fitness studio. You don't go there and start with 60kg on the first day just because you can, you have to go up step by step... In the beginning just start with 2 or 3 x 15 minutes a day, after you get used to it you can increase the time. Don't put 'too much ...


2

On my old Acrosonic Baldwin (1947), I have played with the center pedal down to get a kind of resonance that's similar to "hall" on electronic pianos. Of course, I have to stay at the upper end and steer clear of bass notes as those will just sustain indefinitely when center pedal is down. Side note: What's that pedal really used for, anyway, and does ...


2

We can't hear your playing, but if you are at the stage where you are playing this type of simplified arrangement, I would guess the problem is that you haven't yet learned that the dynamic level of every individual note in each chord is important. The G F# G in the right hand are marked "p" (soft) but you need to play the G and C in the left hand even ...


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