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16

This is fairly standard notation. This is an "altered unison", a chord that includes two different variants of the same note (F-sharp and F-double-sharp in the example); there is no way to represent this with the conventional layout of a single stem. So one way or another, the stem has to be split -- here is a description from Steiner on the Dorico software. ...


13

This notation is orthodox, and at least common enough for an authority to mention it. Gardner Read's "Music Notation," 2nd ed., p. 74, example 5-27 shows two instances of exactly this: a stem trifurcating to a cluster of three noteheads only a semitone apart, in his case E natural F natural F sharp, and D natural E flat E natural.


12

If the piano's passed an inspection that meticulous, then it doesn't need a tuning. "Once a year" is general advice to correct for seasonal variations of humidity. In climates with a significant winter and summer, other advice is to tune a few weeks after you've started to run the furnace, and then again after you've started to run the air conditioner. ...


10

Your playing needs to be in the same key you're thinking about i.e. singing in, and there are basically two different approaches to do the coordination. A: playing adjusts to singing: find the key you're singing in B: singing adjusts to playing: give yourself a harmonic reference before starting to sing, in order to try and force the singing to be in a key ...


9

When sight-reading, your long-term goal should be learning to read and play entire phrases of music, not individual notes. What fingering choice is practical for a specific note might be completely different depending on the phrase. For example: I don't think you would try to play the highlighted D note with any other finger than the thumb of your right ...


8

It is music original written for organ where you have more than one manual plus pedals. Busoni made piano editions of many of Bach's organ pieces and your image shows Busoni's piano version. Maybe it can help to understand the voices in the music by looking at Bach's original and thereby understand what is going on. Below is an image from Bach's handwriting ...


8

Typographer here. First, remember that typography has the rule that it's functional and beautiful. If you can't have both, you aim at the first. And functional means that the player understands the notation. And once you play Liszt, you're probably not a novice and should get this. Second, it's generally considered a crime to change the author's pitch ...


7

In the first instance the "extra" crotchet is there because there are in effect two lines of music going on in the lower staff. One voice is the semibreve low F lasting for the whole bar. The other voice is a crotchet low F followed by the dotted minim C/A chord 1 beat later. It is that crotchet that tells you that the C/A chord is meant to be played on ...


7

I'd love to get the accepted answer on this one as well… but I doubt I will ;) You'll need to read the original question's edit history to see why this opening comment was relevant Unless it's a touring piano with properly strapped legs & large castors, then I'd always weigh brute force against 'survival'. If it's been sitting there years on teeny ...


6

The first bar could be written like this. The extra C just establishes that the melody starts on that note.


6

You do it step by step, first inserting "midway" chords somewhere in between, and then if you want, even more intermediate chords between those. Step by step. If you want to go through all of the given original chords and aren't allowed to change them (though why wouldn't you if you're messing with the chords to begin with), there are only two guiding ...


5

Normally such a line would mean that the connected notes belongs to the same melodic line. Sometimes a melodic line changes hands because of technical reasons making it difficult to play the line in one hand, usually because other things are also supposed to be played with that hand. Then the marking indicates where the melodic line is continuing. But here ...


5

From your question, and the subsequent edits, it is clear you have no idea how fingering on the piano works. I think you have the impression like many beginners do that piano playing starts from a fixed five finger position (like 'C-position' or 'G-position') and then veers out of that. In reality, in most piano-music (that is a bit more complicated than ...


5

On the face of it, it does appear to be rather a silly thing to write! Play one note for only one beat, while holding that exact same note for four! In fact, the bass clef in that bar could have been written the same way - or the treble notes written in a similar way to the bass clef notes. Makes more sense! However... a lot of piano music is written like ...


4

I agree with Albrecht's answer that you should record yourself then transcribe what you are singing. But I will also add this. The human voice can sing a continuum of tones and most modern instruments, especially the piano, cannot! You may be singing notes that simply do not exist in 12TET tuning. This is not a bad thing as plenty of cultures, e.g. India,...


4

It's not necessary to have three stems. The G# can share a stem with the F# or the Fx (as in your example's last two clusters, leaving the Fx or the F# to use a slanted stem. One way to position the stems is for the stem with more notes to be vertical and the other stem slanted enough to make room for the accidental. Another way is to slant both stems -- ...


4

I don't think you should ever push a grand piano - you should always, if you can, pull it. You need to lift it, or at least take as much weight off the leading leg, as much as possible and then try to pull it toward you. Once its moving (i.e. the castors are rolling) it should be much easier to manage (I can't explain that but it has always been my ...


4

Scales fingerings are for scales. Which only get played in practice time and exams. They're designed to allow flowing movement of the hand/fingers. Pieces rarely contain scales - maybe partial scales, but even then, they won't necessarily start and finish as they do when playing 'proper' scales. So, although it's comforting at the moment to do what works ...


4

Find a really good physical therapist, preferably one who works regularly with musicians. I had tough issues 18 months ago with (what I thought was) tendonitis. I play sax, clarinet and guitar. It was severe enough to cause me to take a break from playing. I initially saw one specialist who thought it was carpal tunnel, and recommended various exercises. ...


4

The C in the bar you underlined should be held for 4 beats while playing the other notes for one beat each.


4

Basic problem is being human! We're not machines as such, and other factors affect any performances we do - whether it's playing piano, running, going about our 'normal' day to day doings. One telling thing is the saying 'amateurs practise till they get it right, professionals practise till they can't get it wrong.' There comes a point in practice when we ...


3

It may be that you're singing 'in the cracks'. It may be that you have an idea of the shape of your melody but are singing each phrase in a different key due to vocal limitations. Or it may be something else. But without actually hearing you we're just guessing. Maybe, if you posted a recording of you singing we could help more. But ideally arrange a ...


3

The blue circled tie is likely a slur because the german text under it says "bass smooth and stately" and the slur reinforces the technique you should be following for the bass line of the piece. the red circled tie is a slur from the a to the g, including the stemmed down f. the yellow circled section: - first tie is a slur from the bass note to the f so ...


3

The reaction force of the key is much to small to cause any damage to your thumb, unless you are pressing down very hard on the key after you play the note (which is pointless). The interphalangeal thumb joint you are talking about should not be "doing anything much" in piano playing - certainly not when playing an octave stretch between thumb and little ...


3

The only true answer to "why" would have to come from Debussy himself, and he seems to have been tight-lipped about discussing his music's motivations or techniques. In fact many of his quotes and opinions seem to boil down to rejecting the very idea of music as a technical discipline, e.g. Some people wish above all to conform to the rules, I wish only ...


3

I've never played Clair de Lune, but I have messed around with and played the Moonlight Sonata. Moonlight Mvt 3 is probably the hardest piece I have performed; it is significantly harder than the first movement, and, based on a recording of Clair de Lune, its probably a little harder than that too. If your end goal of piano is just to play the entire ...


3

The answer to "Should I continue taking music lessons?" cannot be answered unless you answer the question "What are your goals?" If the only goal you have and anticipate having is to play Moonlight Sonata, you're at a level where you'll be able to figure it out without too much difficulty on your own. Lessons would help but are not necessary. Whether they'...


3

I assume that you are at a school if you are teaching theory in a classroom? Ask the school to buy a frame with wheels that the piano can sit on. This is what the pianos on stage are set on so that constantly moving it on/off/around stage can be done easily by stage hands and does not damage the piano or knock it out of tune too much. Remind them that if you ...


3

A grand piano should be rolled keys first. Look at how the legs are attached. The "nose" leg is attached perpendicularly to the other 2. So when applying the initial starting force if at all possible you should push the piano like you are trying to run over the player, in that direction. Bonus tip: When you get your piano into its playing position, give ...


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