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4

I had the exact same problem until I learnt functional harmony, i.e. how different groups of chords are usually put together and why. The "bigger picture" if you like. I now practice several different cadences as part of my routine. Also it is very effective to learn how these sound like. For a given tune, rather than practicing over a backing track, I ...


3

Inversion really only defines what the very lowest note should be. So regardless of how you permute the notes in the right hand, the chord is always actually root position as long as you play a D in the left hand. Of course, what exactly you do in the right hand also has an influence at the sound, but as long as you keep in a sensible range then for pop ...


3

@Alex_Lopez has given you good advice regarding functional harmony and the “big picture”. If you think of songs as a series of individual chords or small relationships here and there (there’s a ii V I on bars 7 and 8) it will be much harder to memorize. Think of a song as a journey from the first to the last bar with hills, turns and detours and you have to ...


3

Two thoughts: There is a technique for octave playing where fingers 5 & 1 are used for white keys and 4 & 1 used for black keys. The idea is when 1 & 5 are on white finger four is already close to the black keys. Also, you get some alternating finger motions which can help make things smoother. I don't know this piece or if there are other ...


3

You basically play the eighth note the same length as a sixteenth note because it is staccato. Chopin did this to make the section seem light. And light you should play it so you can play it fast.


2

As I understand it, this is the common approach when writing multiple voices in a single staff, for example with choral music you will have four voices (Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass), and each voice follows its own independent rhythmic markings. In this case, there is a melodic voice (played with fingers 2-5 of the right hand) and the accompanying chords, ...


2

I think this sort of pedalling instruction is simplified. It has to be to ba able to be printed tidily. The basic pedal operation is to use it when any harmony is static - in other words don't pedal over different chord sounds. That needs clarification. For me, play the first note, and before letting go of the key, press pedal. Hold until the harmony ...


2

She's using the sustain pedal (the one on the far right). She can do this because, in the opening four measures, only one chord (E minor) is sounding, so there's really nothing in the melody that would clash with other sustained pitches. Measures 5 and 6 are another chord (B minor), but again nothing in the melody will clash with each other. However, she ...


2

About the meaning of chord symbols: it means that all the notes in that section will be from Dm7 chord. That's not really correct. Chord symbols are used in songs like this as harmonic approximations for those who cannot or don't want to read the notes on the staves. Particularly, chord symbols are almost never a complete harmonic analysis, or a promise ...


1

The 'Dm7' on top of the stave isn't particularly for the piano player. It's there for guitarists basically, as it tells what chord is played in the bar. They may well play one of several different voicings of Dm7, mainly because they can. As a guitarist and keyboard player, I often use those chord symbols as well as/instead of the dots themselves. Sometimes ...


1

The notation for pedal is much more loose than the notation for the notes themselves. Pedaling varies greatly with the piano and even with the room. Therefore, don't see the Pedal in the score as something that you have to follow strictly. When the composer wants something unusual, or wants the pedal notation to be followed strictly, the composer writes ...


1

In the middle of the first full bar I would release the pedal as I start to play the notes of the 4th crotchet beat and re-apply it immediately. Even when there is no previous pedalling I would begin the pedal after the beginning of the note, rather than with the beginning of the note. The reasoning is that by lifting the pedal at the start of the note ...


1

The high A staccato eighth note (R.h.) must be played with the pinky finger and the following second sixteenth note with finger 4. This means the staccato 8th notes have to be played as 16th notes. Hands and fingerings as notated.


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