Hot answers tagged

28

A lot of instruments from the analog era were supposed to sound like other "real" instruments, and were as good as technology allowed then, which is not very. But over time, some have become popular in their own right. Electric pianos were indeed supposed to sound like acoustic pianos (although some manufacturers saw the potential of adding features like ...


12

The prototype of the Rhodes piano was created in 1942 by Harold Rhodes which he called the "Pre-Piano". According to this Rhodes soundscape generator page: Harold Rhodes was a piano teacher who had just developed a new and enjoyable way to learn to play the piano, when the Second World War grabbed him. While enrolled in the Army Air Corps, he kept ...


8

The two As are there to indicate that the left hand is playing two (logical) voices. One has an A half note while the other has a A quarter note followed by a G quarter note. In keyboard terms, this means that you play an A on the third beat and, without releasing the A, a G on the fourth beat. Release both notes at the end of the measure. If you look at ...


6

Check out the history of the creation of the Rhodes piano. To quote the article from Wikipedia: By 1942, Rhodes was in the Army Air Corps, where he created a piano teaching method to provide therapy for soldiers recovering from combat in hospital. He had to develop miniature pianos for bed use, that he made from old scrapped airplanes. So, "...


4

Why would a whole number of octaves be logical or desirable? Music doesn't cut off at octave boundaries - if a piece is in C major that doesn't mean the lowest and highest notes in it will be C. The short and sufficient answer to your question is that pianos don't have an exact number of octaves because there is no reason for them to.


4

One thing that has helped me a lot with metronome practice is to imagine the metronome playing something other than the downbeats. One example is to set the metronome to half the speed I intend to play (120bpm --> 60bpm on the metronome). With that setting, I imagine the metronome clicking on 2 and 4 (assuming 4/4 time signature). Another example is to ...


3

Try slowing the metronome down (but still playing at full speed). because: It helps you develop your ability to keep a steady tempo; On a faster piece, some brains may find it easier to play with a metronome that is ticking every other beat (or every fourth, etc.) For example, suppose you are playing a piece that is in 4/4 time and 180 bpm. That's one ...


3

As ggcg pointed out, changing tempo throughout a piece is common practice. Where people tend to get into trouble is when tempo changes with the difficulty of a section instead of for dynamic expression. Slowing down and counting as you play (1&2&3&4&...) is a good place to start, but eventually you increase to a speed where counting isn't ...


2

A more general principle: in any physical task, prefer bigger muscles to smaller ones. Chopin's etudes Op. 10 and 25 demonstrate this as, shall we say, videogame boss fights that seem impossible until you study the boss's habits and patterns. If you brute force them, your forearms are on fire after half a page. No way can you last through all five pages. ...


2

One thing that helped me a lot was playing the organ for my church. The organ doesn't have a sustain pedal to rely on so almost everything has to be played legato with your fingers only or it will sound disjointed and choppy. This involves a lot of interesting fingerings, and forces you to think about it a lot more. In particular, I picked up a habit of ...


2

The question is confusingly worded but it sounds like you're looking for solutions to damp unwanted, unfretted strings from vibrating after the intended note duration. This is done by either left or right hand depending on the situation. Left hand - just rest a finger on the string to damp it. Right hand - rest a finger, or the palm of your hand to damp. ...


1

just play them like triplets whereby two of the 8th notes are divided in 16th: instead of da-da-da you play da-daba-daba, (or daba-daba-da) ...


1

OK. You have not given us an image (which would really help) but lets try to analyse this. So there are four 16th notes and one 8th note. The 8th note is worth two 16th notes isn't it. So you have a total of six 16th note lengths in all. Same length as three 8th notes. So you are correct that it is a sextuplet, or to think of it another way, a triplet ...


1

how I can play a song in different time signatures This is a textbook exercise for organists learning how to improvise variations on a hymn tune. Note, it's an exercise. The textbooks don't dictate answers. You learn how to do this by just doing it and listening to your attempts. "Amazing Grace" is a waltz. Try to play it as a march. After a few ...


1

I've been tuning for over 20 years and I can still find room for improvement. When I had been tuning for about 3 or 5 years, one guild member told me that it takes about 10 years to get really good. Later, when I had reached that ten year mark, I thought back to what he had told me and I thought," yep, that's about right!" BTW, I'm much better than I was 10 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible