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24

Playing a chord lifts the dampers from just the strings of the notes played. Depressing the pedal lifts the dampers from ALL the strings. A lot more resonance. I'm amazed that you can't hear the difference! Maybe you aren't playing a real piano, but a basic-grade electronic imitation that doesn't model this important part of the piano sound?


8

This line refers to the pedal: You are holding the pedal down before, at the triangle you release it and hold it down again for this bar. So, you can use the pedal to hold down the notes you cannot stretch your fingers for.


7

There is sometimes a middle pedal on pianos, called the sostenuto pedal. Its role is to hold only the notes played when it's operated. so here, using that sostenuto pedal, the three semibreves can be held with it, which doesn't affect the other notes. Using the sustain pedal, found on all pianos, will obviously hold the long notes without having to hold ...


6

One of the most distinctive features of the piano (as opposed to e.g. the harpsichord or the clavichord) is the sympathetic resonance. Whenever you hit one string, all the strings sympathetic to that one (*) will vibrate along with it. Usually the dampers get rid of this resonance immediately, but holding down the damper pedal lets it shine through. Try ...


4

You can get an accurate score here: https://www.mutopiaproject.org/cgibin/piece-info.cgi?id=263 , and you can hear a public domain recorded performance here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Entertainer_(rag) (box on the right). Here's the part you're talking about: The score you're working from is simplified, and in this particular bar it's inaccurate. ...


2

On my old Acrosonic Baldwin (1947), I have played with the center pedal down to get a kind of resonance that's similar to "hall" on electronic pianos. Of course, I have to stay at the upper end and steer clear of bass notes as those will just sustain indefinitely when center pedal is down. Side note: What's that pedal really used for, anyway, and does ...


2

Don't play the piano too long in the beginning. It's a process of building muscles just like in the fitness studio. You don't go there and start with 60kg on the first day just because you can, you have to go up step by step... In the beginning just start with 2 or 3 x 15 minutes a day, after you get used to it you can increase the time. Don't put 'too much ...


2

First I wrote the following as a comment, but then I realized that it is in fact an answer and therefore should not go in the comments section but instead be posted as an answer: Well, it actually sounds fine the way it is written in that score, BUT when you practice it in a slow practice tempo the F♯ will sound weird because you have a G in the left hand ...


1

We can't hear your playing, but if you are at the stage where you are playing this type of simplified arrangement, I would guess the problem is that you haven't yet learned that the dynamic level of every individual note in each chord is important. The G F# G in the right hand are marked "p" (soft) but you need to play the G and C in the left hand even ...


1

It depends on the situation. Often the arpeggio feels like grace notes preceding the top note which is played on the beat. Sometimes the bottom note is harmonically more important, so it's the one that's on the beat, followed by the higher ones. Brahms sometimes writes downward arpeggios as grace notes leading to an on-the-beat melody note. Sometimes it'...


1

Okay so according to the notes you said, basically there are two 7ths in the scale right? A and A#? One is the minor seventh and the other is the major seventh respectively. This corresponds to having two "Ni's" in the swaras. So this is a fun aspect of some ragas where on ascension, they would use different notes like in this one.. On the ascent it's the ...


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