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1

There are a couple things I would note. Most Classical music is pre-recording technology, so we don't have any recordings of how it would have been played at the time, which would likely be the way the composer would have intended it. Because of this, we have to rely on the notation alone. The older the piece of music, the less standardized the notation ...


2

Your questions suggests or implies that the art of art should always be the same in all times and everywhere but it’s just that the art of art has been changing and still changes everywhere and every time. So each artist has his own art to play any piece of art and some write it down like Quantz and C.P.E. Bach and now you can play a piece in the style of ...


1

The confusion is caused by at least two reasons: much of performance practice was not notated precisely, and performance practice was not uniform.


3

This is really going to depend on the music. For example, if you are playing a first-inversion major chord (for example, you have a G♯ in an E-major chord) then your pitch should be lower than it would otherwise be (assuming that the E and B played by the other strings are in tune with the piano). However, nobody will notice this much unless the chord is ...


0

...thinking about the notes and chords... You didn't say it explicitly, but I assume you mean naming the tones/pitches and chords. There are two basic naming approaches: absolute and relative. Absolute names are letter and accidental for tones, like: Ab or C#. For chords the names are letter and accidental for the root and a chord quality, like Ab ...


0

"Muscle memory." I hate the phrase. It is misused. Your muscles have no memory, it is your brain which controls them. When you play the piano, it is not the muscles in your hand playing, it is your brain. If we swapped brains, once our brains figured out the new measurements, our techniques would transfer, too. Like a teenager who trips over the floor ...


5

This question is related to many others about leading tones and TET (equal temperament) with good answers and also wikipedia information like this here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_temperament that render excellent explanations with background information so I can give you a short answer without repeating the entire history of music and temperament. ...


9

The piano might not even be playing. If it is, it is indeed probably the best reference. However in other circumstances it is possible that you would play a slightly different pitch for (example) an E natural as the major third on a C chord, compared to the fifth on an A chord. To understand why this is, you need to understand how intervals (like major ...


0

There are exceptions to every rule, as I guess you're finding out. If you look at Horowitz, you'll find that his wrists often dip below the key level, especially when he's doing finger passages. (Check out some of his Mozart performances.) Gould's wrists would go even lower. But most top pianists keep their wrists above the keyboard level. If you look at ...


1

The short answer is that it depends on whom you ask. This wikipedia article is a very interesting read on the subject of piano pedals and their history. Here's a quote of the material most relevant to your question: Americus Backers' 1772 grand, his only surviving instrument, has what are believed to be original pedals, and is most likely the first piano ...


1

The final sentence of your OP seems to imply that you are considering the flute as the top part and the cello as the bass. That in itself seems very restrictive. Obviously the piano can play below the cello part even if the cello is in its lowest register, and don't forget that a conservative top range of the cello is A5 (one leger line above the treble ...


3

You used the "classical music" tag and within that style I think you will find an overwhelming tendency to include the third in the keyboard part even when the third is supplied by another instrument. A rule of thumb I learned a while back is to reserve the use of open fifths or octaves (open meaning no third present) only at cadence points. That is ...


3

In a well-written duet involving a piano and another instrument (at least IMO), the piano part should sound like it has something missing. Don't worry about the ability of the piano part of a trio to stand alone.


0

You talk about what happens when you become familiar with the piece, but I know a professional pianist who is a good sight-reader, and she doesn't even work out the individual notes when she first sees them. She sees a chord, a harmony, a rhythm, not a collection of 120 dots on the page that need to be analysed and deciphered. I wish I could do that! But I ...


2

I wouldn't worry about the sound of the piano alone -- what matters is the sound of all three instruments playing together. Open fifths in the piano, for example, are fine. Mind you, if you wanted the sound of a complete triad, and only one instrument is playing the third, and it's relatively quiet compared to the other instruments, then perhaps you need to ...


0

An extremely thought-provoking question! Starting with the actual wording: what constitutes a 'better musician'? One who can play a piece perfectly with no mistakes? Not necessarily. For me a 'better musician' is one who will do that anyway, but also be capable of bringing that music to life, putting their own slant to it, and obviously understanding where ...


0

All answers you’ve got until now are great. In summary they are my learning concept even if they seem to be somehow contradictions. Analyzing leads to understanding, concentration leads to meditation, muscle memory helps you play in the flow and and 150% of knowledge and improvisation helps you to take up the thread when you’re dropped out. Learning ...


2

Yes, you become a better musician, if you are able to add the conceptual side of music into your thinking more closely. Having concepts and abstractions is essential for reasoning, and notation, notes and other theoretical tools can provide those. You need some kind of "objects" that have locations and names, for thinking about what things there are, where ...


6

This is a good question but I think a hard one to pin down a short answer for. There reason is that there are several things going on in a musician's mind and body during the learning process and performance. First I would say that you want to use muscle memory. And, you do not want to be "thinking" about anything. When you get to that level performance ...


2

Everything sounds fine. I just finished recording a fairly complex guitar piece and realised I was thinking about all kinds of everyday stuff while I was doing. I try to bring my mind more or less back to the job at hand, but not in a " concentration with effort" way. Relaxed mindfulness is great but if the mind briefyly pops off here and there it's OK. Kind ...


3

The immediate job of playing THIS piece well ultimately comes down to muscle memory. But learning the piece is a lot quicker when you recognise patterns. Same difference whether they're heard or read. And that's all 'theory' is really - codifying patterns that work.


0

Played this recently, and the chart was in 3♭s. Were it in F minor, 4♭s would be appropriate. However, were it in F Dorian, 3♭s would be correct.


2

You're right about that key signature. And I agree about those bare-fifths in the bass. AND I agree with PiedPiper about combining bits you like. Perhaps arranging the left-hand notes into this pattern Etc. might do what you want.


0

What are the underlying theories, if any, behind such, and how can I determine what chords to use?: The key is: the dim7 chord is used as a secondary dominant function (vii dim7 = substitution of Vb9) which you can insert between each degree. e.g. in a progression I vi ii7 V7 as C am dm7 G7 you can substitute the vi degree (am) by c# dim7 and we get: C c#...


0

Polyphony is one of the key parts of a fugue. It is a main part of any Bach work you take. This would fall under a very loose definition.


-1

Your wrist is a fulcrum whose main purpose is to let the energy of your arm pass through the wrist, through the fingers and into the keys. Much like if your alignment is off while walking. If your knee or ankle is not properly aligned and you misstep, all your weight will stop in the joint that is not aligned thus, we sprain our knees or ankles. Instead ...


0

I've had the pleasure of playing hundreds of acoustic pianos over the years. Grands, baby grands, uprights, spinets, harpsichords ... I've also played many keyboards and digital pianos. There is no universal down weight. Yamaha grands feel different than Steinways. Some Yamahas feel different than other Yamahas. Fatar keybeds tend to all feel the same (at ...


1

why so many so called "piano tech" keep mentioning the words "serious damaged" and experienced when coming to piano tuning? I believe anybody who can use the screwdriver can tune their piano with $20 piano tuning kit from Amazon and free app on their phone or PC. Don't make a piano tuning works sound like a multi-million project. People hire tuners only ...


7

Probably a more important factor is your whole body level compared with the height of the keyboard itself. If you sit too low, it will inevitably cause your wrists to be low, as gravity works on your forearms. I encourage sitting so that the elbows are about an inch higher than the top of the white keys. That way, my students can let gravity help with their ...


6

What's really bad technique is having a wrist that stays low below the level of the keys, while you are playing with your fingers. This is a very common beginner mistake that can result in painful wrists and eventually RSI. Don't do this. That's why in the beginning many tutors try to keep the wrists level above the keys. It's a good starting point, but ...


0

It’s do to with how the quavers are grouped. In 6/8 the quavers are grouped in 3s (dotted crotchet beats) and in 3/4 they are in pairs (crotchet beats).


2

Despite the suggestive name, "Piano Tuner" is not an appropriate app for tuning pianos. It's just a regular chromatic tuning app for musical instruments other than the piano. To accurately tune a piano an app needs to somehow calculate a "stretched" tuning that tunes the treble sharper and the bass flatter than normal "equal temperament" would require. (...


0

The Korg SP-250 is a very competent instrument, but it's definately in the low-mid-range price bracket. Closer imitations of an acoustic piano are available, but at a price! Cheap steps first. Yes, a headphone amp (or a more effecient pair of headphones) will make it louder. Have you got a computer with a low-latency audio interface and a DAW program? ...


0

What happens when you listen to a recording of an acoustic piano via your headphones? Part of what you're missing may be the acoustics of the room. A headphone amp helps only if the problem is a matter of volume. The amount of volume a set of headphones produces is determined by: the sensitivity of the headphones (the amount of noise it produces when it'...


0

Acoustic and electronic instruments are two different breeds. Yes, they both have black and white keys, and some even have similar actions, but that's where the similarities end. Just like you can't get a Rhodes or organ sound from an acoustic piano, you can't get a really authentic acoustic piano sound from an electronic piano - unless you pay thousands. ...


2

I actually have the same keyboard, and it seems off that you don't think it's loud at max volume. I play with an 1/4" headphone jack plugged into the front port and I can't turn it up more than halfway or it starts to hurt... You're not trying to plug in an 1/8" jack into there without an adapter or something, are you? Can you try with another pair of ...


1

I don't think that strength is the overriding issue here. Yes you do need a certain amount of strength in your arms and fingers to play but there are many other issues with technique which are more likely to be giving you issues. The best advice anyone here could give you would be to get a teacher, but I am guessing that there are reasons that you cannot ...


1

No, nothing technically connecting the two tracks, but I do think whoever composed the alarm tune was aiming halfway between Thomas Neuman and Trent Reznor's recent soundtrack work. That's probably what you're hearing: a vague stylistic influence without directly copying any particular aspect of their work.


1

Yiruma is the 'River flows in you' guy? Sure, you can have lots of fun playing in that style. But, as you've discovered, that's just one small area of what a piano can do. If the dramatics of Beethoven or Chopin don't attract you, how about Debussy? Or the elegant simplicity of Mozart? ...


2

It can be sometimes that music which is unfamiliar to us in style doesn't sound like "music". What "sounds like music" to people is often that which is familiar to them, and often in a style that they heard a lot when quite young. (When I was young I became a jazz fan by listening to older style artists like Louis Armstrong and Count Basie - but the first ...


1

Every rendition I've ever heard, as I remember it in my head, sounds like it's based over a simple subdivision of that beat into six: 1 2 3 4 5 6 upper taa---ta: * - - - - * lower ta-ta-ta: * - * - * - This is what the notation says. The upper beam of notes ends with a sixteenth, which is half of the value of the corresponding eight in ...


2

this is an 88-key online piano that you can connect to via MIDI. Nothing to download or install. The piano sound resembles that of a grand. https://pianu.com A fast easy solution if you want to turn your MIDI keyboard into a grand piano!


4

The root of the question comes from the incorrect assumption that in Beethoven's time (and earlier) the notation for dotted rhythms was performed strictly according to the math. The math was certainly "strict" in the sense of showing the mathematically correct number of beats in the bar, but that was not necessarily how they were played. A single-dotted ...


4

This is a notorious question, and has been asked many times in the last 2 centuries - you are not alone! You're right in suggesting a polyrhythm - 4 against 3. The difficulty is to play it musically. If you play it exactly, I (personally) find the two notes are a bit too close for comfort, so I tend to overdot the top line a bit. It's also important to ...


3

Your keyboard's built-in metronome ticks faster in 6/8 than 3/4 for the same tempo, because the metronome is probably ticking on eighth notes in 6/8 time and on quarter notes in 3/4 time, but tempo is specified as quarter note "beats" even for 6/8. There are two eighth notes for every quarter note, so you get two metronome ticks per beat. It could also tick ...


1

There is no tempo change implied by changing time signature, it is just a different emphasis within each bar. 6/8 has one a the beginning and a weaker one in the middle (4th of eights). Therefore 6/8 are typically counted in two.


3

This question becomes very interesting when you start looking at articulation. It is very nice to articulate a fugue subject so that it is more recognizable every time it occurs. The subject of the first fugue of the Toccatta in D Minor (BWV 913) begs to have the first note a tiny bit stacatto. "Deet Dah--- Dah -dah- dah- dah- dah ..." But some entries ...


3

Yes, both 6/8 and 3/4 'add up' to six quavers or three crotchets. The difference is in how they are grouped. The second example is clearly grouped as three groups of two quavers - three crotchet beats. The triplet makes this abundantly clear - attempting to notate the bar as two groups of three quavers each would require re-writing the triplet in a very ...


1

If you put a 6/8 meter on this... ...you must do something to deal with the tuplets. In 6/8 the beat is equal to 3 eighth notes (quavers.) So the triplet figure becomes redundant in 6/8. The two beats here are the same in time values... Back to the example, the 3 quavers are one beat with or without the triplet marking. That leaves six semiquavers and ...


0

3/4 time is split differently from 6/8. 3/4 is a bar of basically three crotchets, which is how that bar is organised. 1st beat = 4 semis, 2nd beat = 2 semis and 1 quaver, 3rd beat is 3 triplet quavers. If the bar was 6/8, it would be written out so it could be split equally into two halves. Were that the case, there would be emphasis on the single quaver, ...


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