New answers tagged

0

There is a kind of hymnal (Reformation church) that uses only long note values for four part harmony. Like The Scottish Hymnal. I think these can be good for sight reading for a number of reasons: lots of (homophonic) music is based on adding rhythmic figures to a basic harmonic framework, the long note values in these hymnals focus on only those ...


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http://www.micrologus.com/courses/sight_reading_method For disclosure, I worked on developing the above system.


1

Learn to know the keyboard like driving your car: orientation on the keyboard: a) all 2 black keys open eyes b) with closed eyes) Find all 3 black keys (all octaves), in the same way: all 2 black keys, all EF and BC (the white semitones), all D (between the 2 black) all DC, triads and scales Play ceg, dfa (the scale of C) blind, always stay in contact ...


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The only way to learn to be an effective sight reader is to practice it. Concentrate on reading above and below the staff notes. I sometimes practice hand excericises with my eyes closed. this familiarizes your fingers with the keyboard.


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A commonly used way to play those chords is: D : play the three-note chord D, F#, A with your right hand, and D with your left hand an octave or two lower. D/F# : play the same three-note chord D, F#, A with your right hand, but F# with your left hand. When your left hand plays low bass notes, the ”inversions” marked using slash chords are right, no matter ...


9

The bass is the critical part. D means play a D major chord ...and by default the bass should be D the chord's root. D/F# is a so-called slash chord (or an inverted chord is standard music theory) which means play a D major chord ...but play F# - the chord's third - in the bass. NOTE: When the third of a major chord is in the bass, there is a strong ...


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An interviewer asked Domenic Miller if we should use barre (bar) chords. His answer helped to shape my thinking; play chords the easiest way. I apply the same principle to chord notation: whatever makes it easier to understand. The C13 is exactly what is played in the guitar chord box. I suspect that's why it's notated that way; to make it obvious to a ...


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I disagree with Dekkadeci answer's. Instead: BbM7/C would be a proper and more understable name. Or maybe F11/C, which will gracefully accept the following note E. Look at the two other chords they are: Bb/C and Gm7/C. That C13 candidate does not contain a single note from the C Major triad indeed: no C, no E no G in the chord. Only a lasting bass, that ...


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A lot of it depends on context and the style of the piece. Marches tend to lean toward a straight left hand keeping a steady pulse. Waltzes often use a lot of expression in the left hand to enforce the iconic rhythm. Many jazz standards use a kind of call and response between the hands, playing the right hand expressively, then the left, then the right ...


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There's a concept in piano that addresses what you are starting to think about: voicing. You get to decide, as you go along, which line, or voice, needs to come out more, or less, and adjust accordingly. When I was practice coach for my son's piano study, I would check this by going across the room and closing my eyes and just listen. When there's ...


12

You're still holding the C root at the bottom, so calling it a C chord of some sort is justified. You eventually also hold E (not F), B flat, D, and A at the fermata signs, so calling it a C13 chord (which should contain C, E, B flat, and A at the very least) is also justified. The C13 chord symbol looks fine.


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Stride and boogie-woogie both require a left hand which remains more or less constant, while the right hand plays patterns which are probably quite different rhythmically (and usually have a lot of syncopation). This is not really common in any solo piano music from the classical and romantic traditions, that I have heard. Perhaps need to really focus on ...


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"Common arrangement techniques" are largely the same regardless of how much material the original piece contains -- you'll simply need to do more to a piece containing less material. I don't think starting with songs like this is a good idea. I think it's better to start with pieces that already have a lot of interesting material, so that they require ...


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From me, an old opera player: putting forward going arrows above the notes(= faster) or backward going arrows above the notes( = slowing down) or a sign wave kind of thing over the notes (which to me means a kind of blah blah blah: something is going on here, watch out). I wish someone could tell me where the rubatos in tangos tend to happen (like the info ...


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I had one of these as a child. There was an accompanying booklet which had music notation with coloured noteheads. This instrument is rather non standard - the black notes sound G, and it plays a major scale. So that green notebar actually sounds F# Colours can be helpful to provide a steer for self-teaching beginners. But once you've passed the beginner ...


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First, I suggest that you take frequent breaks, in which you do some dynamic stretches and arm movements to free things up. Also: make sure your shoulders are not hunched up which you're playing it's easy to get caught up in finding the right notes, and this can make practicing a very intellectual activity. Spend some time every day on repertoire -- a ...


4

The body is like a Jenga tower. As long as everything is aligned properly it can stand effortlessly because gravity pulls its center of weight straight down. The tower rests upon itself. The second that there is an imbalance, the tower gives in to gravity and falls. Sitting at the piano, you too must have a balanced center of gravity. For instance, if ...


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The trick is to use 2, 3, and 4 on the G♭–A♭–B♭ stretch in the first half of the scale; otherwise you'll use a thumb, pinky, or have to oddly cross over during that stretch of black keys, none of which are ideal. R: 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 L: 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 2


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It's also known as a 'walking bass'. You're walking down the scale. It walks/works going upwards too. Just before where an E note will come at the beginning of a bar, try playing an F♮. It's out of key, but can sound quite effective.


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This is a pretty common approach to basslines that dates back centuries. It's known as a "step-descent bass," and with some chromatic pitches you can also end up with what is known as a "lament bass." Often a bassline like this repeats over and over, as it sounds like yours does. In such instances, we also call it a "ground bass," which just indicates a ...


2

Although not all engravers make the distinction, it is common to place ties and slurs differently. A tie should be placed between the note heads, while slurs should be placed conspicuously above or below them. In this case, the curved marking is quite conspiciously above the note heads, implying that it is a slur even though the pitch doesn't change.


10

The notes are not tied. This is relatively conventional notation for portato, which is rather like a "sticky" staccato with longer but still detached notes.


1

Take the polyrhythm carefully counted out in the largest common subdivison, and drum it on a table with one line to a hand (e.g., semiquavers with the left, triplets with the right). An easy way to do this is to count the rhythm as though it's an entire bar, I first learned to play 3:4 by counting my right hand in 3/4 beats, bringing my left hand down on 1-e-...


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Without seeing a video of you playing, we are guessing to some extent. But this sounds like you have the wrong basic idea about what "passing the thumb under" means. It doesn't mean that you have to keep your hand perfectly level, then stretch your thumb as far as it can go and bend your wrist sideways in an effort to reach the right note. One way to ...


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Something people aren't considering is the accuracy of the transcription in the first place. This problem of course isn't limited to synthesia, but it is definitely a lot more prevalent. If I look up the most popular synthesia videos on Youtube, a large portion of them will have extremely ridiculous mistakes, including wrong chords that any trained musician ...


1

I have always used warm soapy water on a wash cloth, not dripping, for dirt and grease, and then I dry it with a soft towel. For dust and loose dirt, I use a vacuum cleaner with a dust brush attachment and I focus on the spaces between the keys as well as the tops of the keys. For the piano cabinet I just use a tack cloth to keep it clean.


3

This is a very broad question, the answer to which largely depends on the composer and the end result they are aiming for. Given your clarification, I can provide some directions that I would personally go for. First of all, you should determine the key the piece is in. This particular one sounds like E minor to me (I don't have perfect pitch, so correct me ...


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I am using a 3-wheel dolly similar to the above (rated at 300 lbs per dolly) to move a baby grand about 50 feet across a level room. One dolly fits under each leg which distributes 1/3 of the original weight of each leg among 3 castors (instead of one). To get the dolly under the leg, I was able to raise the leg about 3/4 inch using a block and prybar and ...


0

Minor flat 5? That's a diminished triad! But in all seriousness, though I'd call it °maj7, I've seen plenty of use for that chord. Built on the 4th scale degree in major, it makes a nice minor-plagal-ish sound similar to that of ivmaj7 [that's to say, Xm(maj7)]. It can function also very similarly to a fully diminished chord: iii7 to ♭iii°maj7 to iim7 ...


0

Have you ever hiked a scree field or maybe hiked a boulder laden trail where the path is uneven, the rocks are different sizes, distances, shapes and heights and you have to make short or long leaps between rocks? Scales are like that. You don't just play them and magically you can play fast. You play fast because like hiking those rocks, you make ...


2

Skimming through the existing replies, I'd also like to add that practising scales induce Discipline as a pianist. Especially true if you want to be a professional pianist or classical pianist (hobby or professional). Practising scales help with lots of other small things such as techniques, music theory, sight-read so on and so forth. But to be good at ...


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Yeah, I'm pretty sure that's a half-diminished chord. Root-m3-d5-M7 forms a diminished triad, and that Major seventh on top keeps the seventh chord from being completely diminished, so it's "half-diminished." In a major scale, it is the chord that leads to the tonic chord. For example, if I were to play the chord that you found - C half-dim 7 - then you ...


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Your expectation was correct. Since the F in the right hand of the thumb is written as a dotted quarter note, it should technically still be playing when that left hand plays the high G. The performer in the video is using some sustain (either with a pedal or a particular sound) and as such is allowing themselves to be a little sloppy with some of these ...


4

You are probably going much too fast, as a beginner. We don't know what standard you are at after your "unsuccessful tries", but the ABRSM exam syllabus gives speeds for the different grades. If we convert them into 16th note scales (they are given in the syllabus for 8th-note scales) they are: Grade 1 - 30BPM. 2 - 33. 3 - 40. 4 - 52. 5 - 63. 6 - 76. 7 - ...


12

I agree with other answers that the speed to practice scales at is the speed where you can play them accurately, evenly, smoothly, and cleanly. Beyond that, when you ask what the goal should be in terms of speed or where "diminishing returns" set in, I would counter by asking you, "Why are you practicing scales in the first place? What are you trying to ...


6

Scales are great exercises and warm-up material. They help get fingers flexing, and also help one understand which notes go together diatonically, but that will depend on which scales one plays. As far as speed is concerned, it is as important to be able to play them slowly and in time as it is to play them fast, albeit accurately. If it's for exam purposes,...


7

The speed you should be doing them at is the speed at which you can do them accurately and evenly. Once you get comfortable doing them at that speed, notch it up a bit - never going faster than you can handle. Don't just practise the ones that you are good at and know well. Spare time and energy to get the trickier ones just as good. There is no rule ...


1

For completeness, as you're looking for 'non-perfect, characterful' sounds: the MacOS contains (somewhat ancient) Roland General MIDI samples, which include 4 different piano samples, plus a 'honky-tonk'. The library can be difficult to access: it's easiest using apps which directly play the sample to incoming MIDI, such as DLS-MIDI-Synth on the Mac App ...


1

I'm giving another vote for Pianoteq v.6 Standard Edition. It allows you to modify your piano`s sounds to the nth degree including slightly detuning the piano if desired. I'm not sure why someone stated that it can't be used live as I've been doing this for several years without complaint from the audience or my bandmates. Another advantage is a working ...


1

I personally love The Grandeur and Noire for Kontakt by Native Instruments. Incredible sampling, lots and lots of options, especially with the Particle Engine on Noire. Check out the examples on their website. In regards to below comment and my mistake in reading the question. Check out The Gentleman and The Giant for upright


2

Before spending money, check out SFZ libraries. I know for sure that there are many decent free or <20$ grand pianos in SFZ, so maybe some uprights too. SFZ player VST is free. And I think I saw SFZ-to-Korg converter the other day, so maybe you can load them into your gadget. Pianoteq Player has too loud hammer sound for live playing, and you can't tune ...


2

Preamble The other answers don't really discuss the technical part, they just give advice on how to deal with varying opinions. This is very valuable, but I thought discussing technique would still be an important addition. (After all, that's what the question is about.) Now I am not familiar with Dorothy Taubman, but looking at the Wikipedia article you ...


0

I don't beleive in methods but I do beleive in the laws of physics, ergonomics and our biology. Our fingers have no muscle so we use the muscles of the arm to play. Your tendons are bundles of bundles of bundles of bundles of fibers. Each of the bundles or fibers are responsible for the fine tuned movement of the fingers. The key is not to use the same ...


0

I would add that it is easier to continue from the B chord to the E(-minor) chord if your B chord fingering is 532 instead of 531. It is faster to just alternate between the 2 and 1 fingers instead of moving the 1 finger from one piano key to another.


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If it is in your price range (about 130 euros for the cheapest "stage" version) consider Pianoteq. All the versions have the same basic sounds, the difference is the amount of customization you can do (and at the top end, that means about 30 parameters you can change separately for each of the 88 notes!). You can select two "piano packs" with the cheapest ...


6

I've sometimes used Addictive Keys Studio Grand. It has a jangly 'pub piano' preset you might like. Also an 'aged strings' one, and others, with the mikes in a variety of arrangements. The presets are radically different from each other. There are about 35 of them and they're very easy and enjoyable to edit. They also do a 'Modern Upright' which might suit ...


1

I agree with the other answers there are as many ways playing piano, learning and teaching the piano as there are ways to Rome. We don‘t have to change our teachers (and doctors, coaches, political leaders etc. as far they are not doctrinaire, intolerant, tyrannical and as long they show their respect to as as we are respecting them. I had piano teachers, ...


4

You need to realize that pianists and piano teachers are sometimes judged more by reputation and "genealogy" than anything else. If you were a pupil of a pupil of a pupil of a pupil of Liszt, that automatically makes you a minor deity, whether or not you can actually play or teach. The same applies to having studied at Juilliard (or name your favourite non-...


4

Both concepts have their place, along with several other ideals. It depends a lot on what the music is, where it originated, what you want to do with it, how you make it play most effectively - all for starters. As a teacher, I welcome other methods of playing/learning to play, and quite like it when a challenge such as this arises. It affords a different ...


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The general question is: how do you play legato (strike a new note before releasing the previous note) when your hand is already doing something else, thereby limiting your choice of fingering? There is no general answer, but rather a collection of tricks that you learn as you go through more and more advanced repertoire. Successive intervals in one hand ...


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