New answers tagged

-1

I expect your mobile phone has an audio record function. Do you need anything more complicated?


2

I think you have more than one problem here. The first problem is that non-weighted keys are not designed to be played in any way except fully-on or fully-off. It's a design that comes from church organs and has followed on through other organ designs. You can try to train your fingers to do this, but it's not going to be as successful. The second problem ...


1

I spent an hour playing piano while wearing Nitrile, Powder-Free, 4 Mil gloves. I played snippets of a range of repertoire on an upright with plastic keytops and a grand with ivory keytops. Here are my observations. Overall Some minor, initial difficulty judging chord shapes (probably due to resistance; see below), but not to the point of missing notes. ...


7

The transcription is correct. Below is a screenshot from a YouTube video that includes the score. To play the chord, play the grace note (A#) with your pinky, and hold it with the pedal. The remainder of the chord B#-E-A-A# can be played 5-3-2-1 (or 5-4-2-1). Someone with big enough hands could play the entire thing, including the grace note, 5-4-3-2-1. ...


6

Spring action keyboards can be difficult for getting a good feel and dynamics. I looked at an online manual for your keyboard and found something that might help you. On page 52 of the manual there is a section called “Changing the touch response of the keyboard”. There are 4 settings but “fixed” is useless unless you want all the notes to be the same volume....


1

First off, don't look for any deep logic behind the naming of these chords. We can argue all night over what G7 and Gmaj7 SHOULD mean. But I can tell you what they DO mean G7 is a G major triad with the minor 7th added. G, B, D, F. Gmaj7 is a G major triad with the major 7th added. G, B, D, F♯. If you want to go on: Gm7 is a G minor triad with the minor ...


1

I tried this fingering, i don't know if it' ll work on a fast tempo. Maybe, the use of the first finger for double notes is better.


0

Your fingering follows the phrasing well, but as an alternative, consider making use of the "long" E at the beginning of the second group to reset your hand/fingering. (1,3,1,2,3,5),(3),(1,2,3,4,5) For reference, here are screen captures of the passage from the video linked in the OP.1 The OP transposition differs slightly from the original ...


3

The beginning of the pedal mark indicates that you need to suppress the sustain pedal and at the end it needs to be released.


4

The └ mark means "apply pedal", and the ┐ mark means "release pedal". Here is a more standard notation from the Godowsky edition of the piece:1 1Ludwig van Beethoven, Sonata in C Minor (1798), Op. 13, "Pathétique", mm. 1-2. The pedal markings both in the OP and Godowsky are editorial, not Beethoven's. Beethoven did not give ...


2

I'll assume that your real question is, how to change sounds in the middle of a song. This is an age-old need and your idea of pre-programmed and timed song sequences is only one way to do it. There are many different strategies for it. I'll try to list a few. Make a sequence ("template song") for each song's exact bar structure and the sound ...


0

Calfskin gloves must be in with a chance. They certainly look thin and supple enough. These white satin ones are so cheap that if they don't work you won't have wasted much on them. I reckon they'd need some rosin on the fingertips. If they do work you could maybe find a smarter brand. Masonic kid gloves look quite fetching, but they'd only work if those ...


2

Using designated MIDI notes as control messages - 'key-switching' - is standard practice in sequencers such as Cubase. It's also an internal feature of some virtual instruments. Musical Theatre keyboardists routinely use MainStage on a Mac computer to play the complex and ever-changing patches that have become their stock-in-trade. Program switching is ...


0

Not sure about piano, but I had cracked skin / lesions on my fingers last winter and was surprised to find that I could easily play guitar chords and single note lines wearing cheap DIY gloves like these ones.


3

That should be possible, especially with MIDI as notes are coded as orders. However, have you think about how risky that would be? An algorithm trying to detect the tempo and then counting the beats in order to manage a transition would have some chances to fail somewhere. If that would be the case you would have no way to recover which, for a live ...


0

More important than fingering is how you use your fingers. Correct fingering will not help you if something is amiss in the arm and prevents the finger from getting to where it needs to be. Art Tatum famously played many of his scales and arpeggios with only two or three fingers. The secret to playing these scales is to avoid spreading out the fingers and ...


0

You ability will get better with practice. As Piano players, I am sure we all have had such experiences at some point in our musical journey. Struggling is normal. It doesn't matter which hand one uses to engage in his/her day to day activities. Playing piano depends mostly on for how long you practice.


0

You can use a Tie to sustain notes in this manner. There is more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tie_(music)


0

Hold down C with left hand(Thumb) and play it with the right hand(Thumb) followed by the other sixteenth notes. When right hand releases it, hold it down with the left hand(thumb) to last for the next bar as well.


0

The cross staff notation without any LH & RH markings is what makes this unclear. As @JunyN says it seems strange a book about fingering would not explain it more clearly. I think if you put the two hands into separate staves then explicitly notated rhythm and fingerings, it would probably be... ...where (1) means LH 1 is brought down on the C3 key just ...


2

Fazioli recommends a detergent/disinfectant solution or an alcohol solution of no more than 30% for their piano keyboards. The site includes an instructional video. On other sites: Steinway recommends hydrogen peroxide. The Piano Technicians Guild Piano recommends disinfectant wipes, as does Piano Magazine.


0

Do harmonic or melodic need to be serial row when we use in real sheet? If you're writing serial/dodecaphonic music, then, of course, yes. Otherwise, no. As colleagues appointed, that's not a serial example here in the image. But be aware that some degree of freedom exists in both worlds. And, also, there are very sophisticated serial techniques in which the ...


3

I would find this easier, especially if it's fast:


3

Two TEACHERS? One of them shouldn't really be teaching! Key signatures and accidentals aren't cumulative. Fx is two semitones above F, whether the key signature includes F sharps, F naturals or F flats (it COULD happen! Just...) Sometimes it's convenient to spell Fx as G. Usually, this will do no practical harm to the music. Though, paradoxically, it ...


2

Your one teacher's logic says since it's become a G, and that's sharp in the key sig. it needs to be played as G♯. That teacher needs to find a teacher! Possibly listening to the suggestion being played is enough to prove him wrong! The other says play a G. That's not strictly correct either. You're playing Fx (F♯♯), which happens to live where G lives, but ...


8

You should play an F doublesharp, which is enharmonically equivalent to a G. This is because accidentals are not cumulative; the doublesharp does not raise the F♯ by two half steps, but rather it replaces the single sharp already present on the F. Thus you should play F raised by two half steps, which is enharmonic to G. And as it turns out, this F ...


2

Play the C with the LH, re-play it with the RH, then hold it with the LH. A lot easier to do than to explain! Don't over-think it. Once you catch the musical intention, the fingers won't be a problem. If it was to be pedalled, I might be tempted to do this (stems down LH, stems up RH.) I'd have to phrase against the fingering, but at least I'd be hitting ...


2

The two low Cs need holding for both bars. If your piano has a sostenuto pedal, you can press that before you let go of those keys. Hold it down for both bars. If you only have a sustain (damper) pedal, you can do the same. That means then all the other notes will continue to sound after they've been played. It's not a problem, as they all belong to the same ...


0

All the sixteenth notes are played with the right hand. Part of the right hand is simply notated in the lower staff instead of having a clef change in the upper staff.


3

Much of the piece is straightforward, and the fingering reasonably intuitive. However, there are some sections to watch out for and some requiring license. mm. 3-4 These two measures require some wide leaps so may need extra practice for accuracy. mm. 13, 15, and 25 The problem in these three measures is that the hand-span is too large (for anyone who can't ...


3

Since we don't know why the hand-crossing was suggested, here is some discussion of how the piece could be played with it, and why. For reference, the score can be found on IMSLP. For Facilitation I find no passage facilitated by hand-crossing, so unlikely this was the reason. The piece is laid out very well, and notated clearly, to be played without hand-...


3

Chord symbols are an approximation and simplification of essential harmonic ideas for accompanists, leaving precise details up to players to decide. Whoever wrote the notation, declared that the essential idea is "A7", and playing the notes written on the lower staff is one possible realization of that idea. Chord symbols are a way to describe the ...


1

The picture in the OP has the appearance of coming from an "easy piano" arrangement. In such arrangements, it is not uncommon for the chord notation and staff notation to differ slightly. In the case pictured, the arranger is likely trying to preserve both the voice-leading (as discussed by Michael Curtis) and simplicity of fingering/hand-movement. ...


5

I think your question might be better worded as... why did the composer or arranger of this sheet music use an A7 chord label for chord tones E G #C when the purported chord root A is missing? The simple answer is: in this case the chord is regarded as an incomplete chord. Strictly speaking you would say the first chord is a C# diminished chord in first ...


0

The simple answer is that this isn't actually an A7 chord, it's a first inversion C# diminished chord. When you go back before functional root-based chordal practice, you had basso-continuo-based practices. One of the most common guidelines for harmonizing bass scales was the rule of the octave, which typically prescribed a 6-chord (first inversion triad) ...


10

Arpeggiating isn't an exact science. You could play two notes (or more) during the arpeggio. Chord-wise, the first to be sacrificed is usually the 5 note - in chord C7, for instance, the G would go Think about it - without C, it's not a C chord. Without 3 (E), it's not major, and without 7 it's not a 7th chord. So the same could apply in arpeggios. If ...


0

For the basic inversions, work on seeing the thirds and fourths contained. ie-- root is thirds. 1st inversion has third on the bottom, fourth on top. 2nd inversion has fourth on the bottom, third on top. Practice moving the hand between those shapes and simply placing the fingers there. Improve economy of motion to each of those shapes (with very little ...


1

If you really mean for the score to show three voices, you would use rests for each voice when it is silent like in this 4 voice fugue... You didn't say what the pitches are, but as they will overlap I assumed you were working with chord tones. It could be like this...


0

Grades In Jane Magrath's standard grading reference The Pianist's Guide to Standard Teaching Literature, the Scarlatti "Aria" is Grade 7, and the Bach C Minor Prelude is not included, placing it beyond grade 10. Scarlatti Based on my own experience, the Scarlatti is the markedly easier of the two. Its slow tempo allows "breathing room/thinking ...


1

What you have shown here is a set of questions asking to note down the key by looking at the accidentals. Playing and writing scales are fundamental exercises one should involve in to succeed in musical studies and career. But, the pieces that we come across comprise of tunes, not all notes of a tune are arranged in the same order of its key. If we take a ...


1

The measure should look something like this ... X:1 T:Multiple Voices Example 1 K:C clef=bass middle=d M:3/4 L:1/4 %% score (V1 V2 V3) V:V1 stem=up V:V2 stem=down V:V3 stem=down [V:V1] z z g || [V:V2] x d2 || [V:V3] G3 || ... or this ...


2

I guess you've already done the obvious Google search? But just in case you haven't, here's one source. (There are several others.) I'm sure they all emphasise the warning that there's a lot of tension on a piano string and,while the harp is unlikely to break, an individual string might, and you don't want it whipping across your face.


1

There are a handful of standard notations for indicating which hand/fingering to use, and also a variety of notations geared toward beginning piano students which are standard within a particular author's books, but which can vary from author to author. Standard notations Brackets are sometimes used to indicate which hand should play certain notes. (Image ...


2

I think you shouldn't overstate the ease of guitar chords just because you can slide a non-open chord up and down the neck. That certainly is not the whole picture of playing chords on guitar. Similarly don't discount the shape patterns that do exist on the keyboard. There are certain shapes that repeat like E, A & D major or Eb, Ab & Db major, etc. ...


1

Swing is a rhythmic feel, not a tempo. And there's not much theory in it. You just play pairs of 8th notes not evenly but with the first one longer than the second. Not 'ta-ta ta-ta ta-ta-ta' but '-doo-bie doo-bie doobie'. Not trotting, skipping. You've heard it a thousand times. Don't try to count it mechanically. A demonstration should do it.


2

In addition to Athanasius' great answer is the fact that virtually every chord change involves at least one note which is static. I encourage students to know what that note is for any two chords, and move fingers to the changed notes. Simple example - triads C and F. Common note C. L.H. - C E G, hold on to C, move to C F A. Practise with C on top instead - ...


7

It's true that piano doesn't offer the similarity between chord shapes that guitar does, though that's not true of all chords (i.e., those that have open strings). To play the same progression in multiple keys on guitar will also frequently involve rearranging patterns a bit. Anyhow, advanced pianists often spend a lot of time practicing patterns in ...


2

C or D I suppose. But, particularly if this is on piano, it might actually be HARDER to play in a different key. The 'all the black notes' keys can fall very nicely under the fingers, just as well as an 'all the white notes' one. Self-taught pianists often 'busk' in G♭ and D♭ majors. Maybe you're more scared of D♭ major than the students would be!


1

'To preserve the original feeling' - any key. As, on piano, all notes are part of 12tet, and to most people, a transposed piece will sound the same in any key. Most will not include those with absolute pitch, or those who would be aware that it's been transposed by something like half an octave. My suggestion would be to transpose to key D major. In fact, ...


1

What instruments? C major is close and has the simplest key signature. D major is also close, and is easy for beginners on stringed instruments because there'll be plenty of opportunities to play notes on open strings (G, D, A, E).


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