New answers tagged

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It does'nt matter what you use as long as you feel at ease that way. I play the vibraphone with only two mallets and still can play the piece. Lex.


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Tama is saying above: "This is why the cello and contrabass have the same string sequence despite being the opposite order (low string on right)." That is utter bs. Cello and contrabass both have the lowest string on the left, exactly as in guitar and violin. Unfortunately I can't comment on that because I have no points enough. I would report the answer ...


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It's going to affect just about everything. But to what extent, is another question. String windings that are full of dirt and dust will not sound as bright as clean ones. Rusty single strand strings (the higher part) won't vibrate as well as un-rusty ones. The felt on hammers will be affected by ingrained dirt. The moving parts (hundreds of them) won't ...


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The music is written as if RH and LH are played by separate instruments. There would be no problem, of course, in one instrument sustaining the B while the other instrument played its own B. The musical intention is clear. But to achieve it on one piano keyboard requires a compromise. No, you can't omit the second B. It needs to be heard. The ...


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Not much, unless it's so extreme that it's actually impeding mechanical action. I certainly don't think you can blame dirt for a heavy bass-end action. Perhaps for ONE sticking note.


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Synthesia is at its most helpful when fingerings are added to the notes. Otherwise, you need to have at least a fairly good sense of which fingers to use on a given piece. Also, many who use Synthesia never learn proper legato playing, nor how to use the pedal. They play like a gamer might play. Leaving the pedal down through the whole piece thinking it ...


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The transcription looks OK and a pianist would easily work out how to finger it. It does need phrasing, slurs and pedal-marks though. So I've laid it out to show which hand does what, but it's a less elegant way to do it than the original. Your second phrase would be fingered like this:


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Edit: Is this something with the transcription and it needs adjustments? if so, how?? Yes, maybe this is a transcription. A simple solution would be playing the r.h. an octave up. For example in the 2nd attached picture, can I just omit the B on the left hand? You can, but the melody won’t be heard the same way. But if you repeat this B as written ...


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I would say that your student slows down because she has a problem with the theory, technique, coordination or fractions of that passage. A metronome could make things worse as it would force her to keep the tempo at the risk of sacrificing or glossing over something which could become hardwired improperly. A dozen lessons in theory, physics or math is order....


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We can argue about how to use the metronome while learning a piece. But once you feel you HAVE learned it, I see no possible objection to checking that you can play it at a constant speed.


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First, the most important thing to be a good arranger is to listen. Listen to orchestral arrangements of songs that you know. For example, you can check out this Christmas concert here. Listen particularly to the counterplay between the strings and the vocals. The choir is always singing basically whatever is in the hymnal while the orchestra gives extra ...


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We've all slowed down during more complicated passages! Chances are she doesn't need a metronome to keep time. She just needs to play the better known parts a little slower! Metronomes have their place - although in 60+ yrs of playing and 50 odd yrs of teaching I've never been compelled to use or advocate use of one. With a fairly good sense of rhythm and ...


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A quick note at the beginning--it's important to remember that the solos a bebop musician plays are not exclusively the result of practiced notes. They are a result of ideas one hears, intuitions one has developed, and technique one has established. Influence of Swing Many bebop players were heavily influenced by swing. Charlie Parker memorized Lester ...


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Don't transcribe the repeated notes, just the pitch, than treat them like thrillers, mordents or tremolos using a sign above this notes like an sign for an ornament, that is either played with both hands or with one hand holding vertically and pulling the fingers down the keys (like a karate hit) - but don't break the piano.


2

All live, I guess? If you can only lay one track down first, drums is good.That sets the tempo (with a good drummer!) Drum breaks can always be overdubbed. Then the rest of the rhythm section - guitar (rhythm) and bass - any order.Assuming the drummer can play to a click track, it's worth including one. If not, and the drummer fluctuates, on what may ...


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On top of the piano's (closed) lid, pointing at you. Normal close vocal mic. Second mic behind the piano, pointing at the soundboard probably about 2/3 towards the treble end. But experiment. If the piano's against a wall, you might just have to drop a mic down behind it. Probably won't sound as bad as it ought to. You can try opening the lid and ...


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If it's a rhythm-based song, lay down the rhythm section, drums, bass, enough piano or guitar to enable the lead singer. Maybe a guide instrumental track of the melody to give the singer something to latch on to. All these tracks can be replaced later if needed, but get the groove right - everyone else's performance will need to fit with it. Then the ...


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After following the comments and answers, and after seeing your practice video, I'm giving this answer. Q: How to practice for speed and consistency? A: By practicing speed and consistency ONLY. Forget about this song's busy piano arrangement, it is beyond your current abilities. Practice speed and consistency on much simpler songs and exercises. You must ...


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My way is always to reduce and simplify a piece e.g.as you say not play the octaves (l.h. Bass tone, r.h. only triads) and the arpeggio passage as block chord. If you have the music understood and “caught” (like we say in German begreifen for understanding = catch with your fingers!) you can be able to add the octaves. So your fingers will find the keys and ...


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You are doing something wrong. Practice makes sense when - after each failure - you understand its reason and try to adjust - work to make the specific fix. Your problem might be caused by gazillion things: wrong arm position, wrong hand position, wrong fingering, focusing on the wrong thing altogether (sometimes problems in left hand can manifest as ...


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If this is your first piece you play, it probably is too hard for you. Even if it is not the first one, but you are learning playing piano for less than 3 years, it could still be too hard. But if you really like it you can keep trying to play it to keep high your mood, but do not expect too much. In any case, remember: you cannot become good at playing a ...


0

There are no triplet. But you mean the middle finger: Play the prelude slowly Try to play it with bowed fingers and with stretched fingers. Find out the optimal stretching position of the middle finger. Pay attention to the weight of the arms. Vary the weight. As the middle finger is longer it is normally nearer to the torque of the keys and this would ...


2

Seems to me you are making a very specific type of mistake over and over so I think your best course of action is to shelve the piece and discuss this with a teacher or at least a more experienced player to see if there is something you can change in your technique or something you can practice to improve your accuracy with jumps rather than continuing to ...


4

The following suggestion is based on my experience developing a software course called Guitar Speed Trainer and on countless conversations with users of that course. Of course the guitar has a whole different set of issues than the piano, but I think that some of the general principles are valid for all instruments, and I hope this will help you at least a ...


4

Some pretty straightforward advice: The point of practicing slow is to break the song down and see what mistakes you make. Playing a fast piece might not help you understand why you make mistakes. When you play the same piece slowly, see in which parts you make the mistakes, see why you are making the mistakes and practice those until you fix them and can ...


1

Unless the strings or the tuning pins are damaged and need replacing, a piano can always be tuned perfectly. But the real question is: how well and how long will that piano hold the tuning? A good quality piano which is tuned regularly becomes "well conditioned" and will hold the tuning well and for a long time. On the other hand, even a good piano, if ...


2

God, is this a badly written bar. Since it's in 3/2, here is my take on it: Here are the 3/2: So that is one voice on the left hand (pretty clear) and the first voice of the right hand. This would be the second voice of the right hand, which lasts only 2/2, followed by a rest: These just seem to be grace notes not written as grace notes: I am saying ...


1

Instead of pattern/shape memorization, I try writing out the harmonic analysis (what chord in which inversion am I playing, what mode, or what scale degrees are the target notes of the melody, etc) so that I also have full 'intellectual' control of the piece and I feel in control. This is quite a good start. Additional to this there are some other ways that ...


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With poor sight-reading usually goes the need to learn by rote - playing over and over until muscle memory has it. That is repetition, and is far more a mechanical process. The 'analysis' of a piece usually comes later - the brain is pretty well occupied in the initial stages merely getting the right notes in the right order in the right timing. For your '...


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One characteristic of the sarabande is that normally the second beat is dotted. In 3/2 the pattern is half, dotted-half, quarter, repeat. Check out some of the early La Folia variations (Vivaldi?). Sometimes (rather common) there is a a two-measure pattern of: half, dotted-half, quarter; half-whole. The short-longish pattern in triple time seems to be most ...


5

Yes, something interesting happens when you bring in the B or Cb chord. What happened? Or maybe you should ask what could happen after that. Many things could happen! To demonstrate the "borrowing" idea in practice: you can use the Db chord as a short step to another key, for example Eb minor or Gb major. How short or long it is and how serious you make the ...


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Part of the basic concept of meter is that the first beat of a measure is accented. There is no need to specifically write out that default accent on beat one in notation. If beat one gets an accent by default, it stands to reason the other beats are unaccented. 2/4 meter should have a kind of | BOOM pa | BOOM pa| feel where BOOM is the accented beat one. ...


1

We are not only making music for performing. My purpose the is to understand what I play and have pleasure. That’s why I see more different approaches: R.h. Melody or soling, l.h. Bass R.h. Melody, l.h. Rhythm R.h. Chords and rhythm, l.h. Bass Both hands chords and rhythm So if we have the elements or parts 1) tune, 2. harmony rhythmic chords and 3. ...


5

First - and most important - there is no requirement to choose all the chords of a piece (or section) of music from the same scale. But some people have a fixed idea that there SHOULD be. So they work out complicated systems of 'interchange' and 'borrowing' to justify 'outside' chords. They aren't in the home scale, but they're in some other scale. So ...


6

Play the same progression in C major and you will see the chord in question is Ab = bVI. Transposing to C or a minor is what I always do if I don’t understand a degree or function. Like moonwave99 says: bVI in E♭ is C♭, not B.


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You are actually playing a Cb major, enharmonic equivalent of B. It sounds good because Cb can be seen as borrowed from the parallel minor (Eb minor), so you get that juicy, unexpected sound. It works because it resolves back to Eb (in second inversion) this way: Gb -> G Eb -> Eb Cb -> Bb You can notate the chord as bVI. Experiment in other keys as well! ...


1

From a simplistic point of view, the two techniques are separate. When there's no bass playing, you provide that with l.h., and put the harmonies in with the r.h. You're in charge of both. When you play with a bassist, he'll be putting in what your l.h. would otherwise do, give or take. So listen to what he's playing, and use r.h. again for the chords. You ...


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The only way to learn how to sight read is to sight read. If you like Bartok, then "Mikrokosmos" is a great set of pieces to practice sight reading. They are in six books, starting with very easy (and also musically interesting, no small accomplishment) and going to fairly difficult. I would start with Book 1. If they seem very easy to you (you can play them ...


1

Strictly speaking, your piece's nine "Little notes" are to fit into the space of two eighth notes, because that's what's not taken up by other notes in the measure. When you write the number like that, that's what you're saying, that those notes are to fit into that space so to speak. Here's another example: In the third bar, you have 11 8th notes in the ...


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If you want to compare one which has very little pedal, have a listen to some of Glenn Gould's recordings. For example this one: The same fugue starts at 15:10 on the Richter recording you've provided. You will see that the difference in pedal usage is pronounced.


1

When you learn a rootless voicing, start out by playing it in your right hand while playing the bass note in your left hand. This will train your ear to recognize the bass note when you hear the rootless voicing. Additionally, it's really helpful to practice these rootless voicings over common progressions like the ii-V-I. Practicing over this progression ...


1

What I mean by simplified, is for example the right hand of Op 10, No. 11 reduced to a single note melody and an easier left hand without great leaps. So let’s have a look at measure 1: the highest line is the melody that you can play with the r.h. The two other voices you can let drop as they are octaves of the 2 upper voices of the l.h. The l.h. plays ...


1

I am not aware that there are any simplified versions of that particular study but they may exist. I think I might have seen simplified versions of one or two others but I'm sorry I can't remember where (it was a long time ago). But ask yourself: what would be the point? These pieces are intended to push the performer to do difficult things and thus ...


3

I think it's really helpful to try and internalise the sound of various common jazz chord qualities. It is a lot easier to hear the complicated harmonies when you have a large mental database of sounds from which to work. For example, obviously any jazz musician should know by heart all the seventh chords, but some great useful sounds to know are: maj9 m9 9 ...


2

Let’s consider a wire strung between two posts. After you hit it with a hammer two waves pulses propagate up and down the string, one in each direction. They hit the end posts, bounce in the other direction, and so on; two pulses racing back and forth along the length of the string. The fundamental frequency, ie the pitch of the string, is the inverse of ...


1

I know that to transpose I play 3 half steps up from the note she plays on the sax. What I'm looking for help with is when she plays a minor scale ... Well, if there is a trick behind this question I give this second tricky answer: As your daughter wants to improvise and you are asking for some chord progression and you say you know the difference of the ...


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It's just a fingering. It shows you that you need to play C with the 3rd finger and thus Ab* with the 1st one. You'd also play the low F with your pinky (5th finger). It's quite common to include the fingerings in pieces; it's a way to help the player. Usually, you'd find the numbers on top of the note.From the link I'm providing below, you can see that: ...


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If you want to go to the trouble, this is one of those times to consider using the sostenuto (middle) pedal. You have to do a couple of things to get it to work properly: Play the first measure with the long F, using the pedal. Making sure that only the F is down and the damper pedal isn't when you do it, put down the sostenuto pedal with your left foot. ...


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If you're becoming tense, it's most likely that you are playing them too quickly. If you can play octaves at all, you can play octaves at some slow tempo where you are both relaxed and accurate. Start there. Be patient, and keep at it. There is a process of building up strength in weaker muscles, but a much bigger part of playing "difficult" passages is ...


1

Another technical point: the F on the left side of the line is doing double duty as part of the middle voice and part of the lower accompaniment. This creates a bit of difficulty, as you have to repeat that F on the third beat in the accompaniment, while holding it as part of the middle voice. The line is there in part to call that to the performer's ...


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