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1

You can get away with most 'off sounding notes' in ragtime just because of the speed of resolution. Most rags uses a lot of chromatic notes that clashes with the melody or harmony unless you play it fast enough. There are a lot of walking bass lines with chromatic movements and if played slow they can clash with the harmony or vice versa, but if you play it ...


0

Thanks for all the helpful answers. Indeed, it must sound off due to my slow playing speed and the simplified version of notes. I found this person on youtube who plays the exact notes I posted ( ). Indeed, it sounds ok at the pace he's playing, and he definitely includes the F-sharp.


0

Avoid pain and do not strain. Don't play through pain. Don't force your fingers apart you will loosen ligaments that can takes months to recover. Ask your piano teacher to recommend a reputable book on piano technique. Some modern books start with an in-depth understanding of one's hand anatomy. The book I use starts with posture then "gripping" the ...


0

It wouldn't sound quite the same as a well-tuned piano. But probably not a whole lot different. Assuming the untuned strings are still at SOME pitch in the right ballpark, they'll still resonate when the pedal lifts their dampers. It doesn't matter if the one labelled 'C' is actually resonating at some other pitch!


1

8-voice polyphony will get you a basic piano imitation. 32-voice polyphony may not be enough if you want to use the sustain pedal idiomatically! You need to be wary of published specs. '64-voice polyphony' is not so impressive if each note uses 4 voices. 'Voice' and 'note' can get muddled up in advertising-speak! If we move focus away from 'piano' to ...


0

In addition to the advice given above: do lots of hands separate practice and swap hands at the first sign of discomfort. Shake arms to relax all muscles from upper back to fingertips very often. Then let your arm hang limply by your side for a few seconds. Lift it slowly to the keys while trying to feel which muscles have to contract to get it there. But ...


6

You can get an accurate score here: https://www.mutopiaproject.org/cgibin/piece-info.cgi?id=263 , and you can hear a public domain recorded performance here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Entertainer_(rag) (box on the right). Here's the part you're talking about: The score you're working from is simplified, and in this particular bar it's inaccurate. ...


2

First I wrote the following as a comment, but then I realized that it is in fact an answer and therefore should not go in the comments section but instead be posted as an answer: Well, it actually sounds fine the way it is written in that score, BUT when you practice it in a slow practice tempo the F♯ will sound weird because you have a G in the left hand ...


6

One of the most distinctive features of the piano (as opposed to e.g. the harpsichord or the clavichord) is the sympathetic resonance. Whenever you hit one string, all the strings sympathetic to that one (*) will vibrate along with it. Usually the dampers get rid of this resonance immediately, but holding down the damper pedal lets it shine through. Try ...


2

We can't hear your playing, but if you are at the stage where you are playing this type of simplified arrangement, I would guess the problem is that you haven't yet learned that the dynamic level of every individual note in each chord is important. The G F# G in the right hand are marked "p" (soft) but you need to play the G and C in the left hand even ...


2

On my old Acrosonic Baldwin (1947), I have played with the center pedal down to get a kind of resonance that's similar to "hall" on electronic pianos. Of course, I have to stay at the upper end and steer clear of bass notes as those will just sustain indefinitely when center pedal is down. Side note: What's that pedal really used for, anyway, and does ...


26

Playing a chord lifts the dampers from just the strings of the notes played. Depressing the pedal lifts the dampers from ALL the strings. A lot more resonance. I'm amazed that you can't hear the difference! Maybe you aren't playing a real piano, but a basic-grade electronic imitation that doesn't model this important part of the piano sound?


7

There is sometimes a middle pedal on pianos, called the sostenuto pedal. Its role is to hold only the notes played when it's operated. so here, using that sostenuto pedal, the three semibreves can be held with it, which doesn't affect the other notes. Using the sustain pedal, found on all pianos, will obviously hold the long notes without having to hold ...


8

This line refers to the pedal: You are holding the pedal down before, at the triangle you release it and hold it down again for this bar. So, you can use the pedal to hold down the notes you cannot stretch your fingers for.


0

I must respectfully disagree with almost all the recent comments above. CPE Bach says the following: All embellishments... must not corrupt the purity of the voice leading (Eulenburg edition p 95 point 17 and his examples figure 81). In this case the melodic line is a very obvious ascent up the C minor arpeggio (C to Eb to G) and therefore the F would be a ...


0

Old post, but I'm adding an answer for new visitors. There are twelve scales... (12 major AND 12 minor...), each consisting of twelve keys - "96" keys in total. Then, [you have to play it in both hands] essentially doubling the amount... Let's not quibble about the math and simply admit there are a lot of keys on the piano and lots and lots of ...


1

Okay so according to the notes you said, basically there are two 7ths in the scale right? A and A#? One is the minor seventh and the other is the major seventh respectively. This corresponds to having two "Ni's" in the swaras. So this is a fun aspect of some ragas where on ascension, they would use different notes like in this one.. On the ascent it's the ...


0

someone suggested that you have to memorize each key pressed in the correct order per sequence. What you read about rules and finger-setting might have been a good meant advice to a beginner and was not meant for all piano pieces but for just a difficult passage. It sounds like a form of torture conceived by the devil himself - To punish the most wicked, ...


2

Don't play the piano too long in the beginning. It's a process of building muscles just like in the fitness studio. You don't go there and start with 60kg on the first day just because you can, you have to go up step by step... In the beginning just start with 2 or 3 x 15 minutes a day, after you get used to it you can increase the time. Don't put 'too much ...


0

I completely agree with all of the above comments, but there's another simple way to figure out what's going wrong (and also to improve the speed and fluidity) - slow down! I've found that the best way to figure out what's going wrong is to slow down the arpeggio (or scale, or whatever) until I can get it perfectly smooth... and then speed it up slowly (...


0

Relax your wrist and arm and relieve all tension. Make sure everything you're doing feels natural. If it's uncomfortable, don't do it or try to do it as little as possible. Remember to go across the keys with minimal effort as if you're laying a blanket rather than trying to dig into every note. If you relax into the keys, your arm weight will ...


1

It depends on the situation. Often the arpeggio feels like grace notes preceding the top note which is played on the beat. Sometimes the bottom note is harmonically more important, so it's the one that's on the beat, followed by the higher ones. Brahms sometimes writes downward arpeggios as grace notes leading to an on-the-beat melody note. Sometimes it'...


-1

Act naturally. There are always rigid teacher with rigid methods and teaching the only single way, as “don’t turn your wrist, don’t move your elbow, don’t stretch your fingers, don’t tap your feet.” Why not combining all natural movements: a little help by the under going thumb, a slight turn of the wrist, a quick move of the hand, a slight support by ...


1

Maybe you are crossing your thumb under the palm and uncurling it is hindering timing? Maybe you are twisting your wrist in ulnar deviation which will create an uneven sound. Try this: Don't abduct (stretch out) your fingers but instead, as you ascend move your arm up the keyboard so that the arm places the hand and next finger. Also, since your fingers ...


1

You found a solution, not, maybe, the solution.Can't really see what his elbow is doing, but it could be nudging to the right on the way up, in order to get that thumb underneath the palm ready for the next C. I prefer students to move the whole hand during and after playing the G with middle finger,, so the thumb is ready to play the next note, C. His ...


1

I asked a friend of mine who is a professional pianist and a very good sight reader this question. It's clear to me that she is reading at a much higher level of abstraction than you or I are. She doesn't read individual notes or even individual chords; she reads several bars of music and sees the rhythms, melodies, and harmonies (and even the dynamics!), ...


0

You'll get it in time. I remember those days. Head on over to your nearest Protestant Church and borrow one of their hymnbooks and sight read though four or five hymns each day. Try to find older books as the new ones have been dumbed down and scored in the easier keys. If you have access to programs such as FINALE or SIBELIUS, download hymns and songs (...


1

Take the simplest nursery rhymes, for example 'Row Row Row Your Boat' and play it across all keys. You do this by randomly picking a note to start the song on. That will make you familiar with all the different keys on the piano and also will make you better at playing by ear. Do not use sheet music when you do this as these are simple songs. Keep in mind ...


1

There isn't really a short cut around this. Playing patterns in all 24 major and minor keys is needed... and it simply takes time to make all the movements become reflexive. But I do think there are strategies you can use to maximize your effort. Standard key signatures are 0-6 sharps or flats (those like C# major, 7 sharps, can be simplified to Db 5 flats....


1

Typically, when students are learning pieces in new keys, it's best to play the scale as well. Perhaps add a few rounds of the E major scale/arpeggios to your practice routine, to get used to playing those sharps? And if it's more of a mindset issue than a technical issue, try playing an easier piece in the same key as your current piece to get you 'warmed ...


1

Pain is a sign that something is wrong. Probably you are overloading yourself with so much practicing. Please slow down and find a way to play without pain, you'll play more in the long run if you don't hurt yourself. "No pain no gain" does not apply to instrumental technique!


2

My students (and I, for that matter!) play up and down the scales and arpeggios of the key they will play in next. It's sort of 'I'm in key E next, so I need my E hat on' approach. The more you play in different keys, the easier it gets.


3

Internalizing key signatures is one of those skills that get continually better the more you practice it, but it doesn't seem like that while it's happening. In other words, keep playing the pieces you're taking on - you will eventually master all key signatures you've met. Of course, there are any number of resources with pieces that expose you to all ...


0

Your fingers don't have muscles so your teacher should be teaching you how to use your arm to play. If a teacher tells you to "release tension" ask him/her what you should replace it with. Something needs to depress the keys if not the fingers, what could it be . . . ? Don't press into the key bed. Once you depress a key using the weight of the arm, leave ...


4

If I understand, you do about 2-4 hours each day. That's a lot at the beginning. I think you should carefully gauge the level of pain/fatigue. The general idea is that you should not feel pain. Fatigue is different. Give yourself enough rest to recover from fatigue. If you feel actual pain, I think you should stop and assess what is going on. A while back ...


0

What did the teacher say when you discussed the problem? Sit at a height so that your forearms are horizontal. Identify and tension in back, arms, hands, and do something about it. Are you practicing obsessively for several hours each day? Your hands may be (forgive the technical term) 'tired'. But we're only 9 days into May. I doubt you've had time ...


5

Hardware instruments (e.g. digital pianos) have a limit on the number of simultaneous notes that they can produce - this part of their spec is called "polyphony". As Todd explained, once you exceed the limit, notes start getting cut off. Some instruments try to do this in a clever way, cutting off the least noticeable notes; others are a bit more basic, just ...


6

You're probably running out of voices of polyphony. You haven't clarified what virtual instrument or synthesizer is the sound source, but most of them have some sort of voice limit, ranging from 1 to 128 voices. If you keep the damper pedal down, then voices can get used up very quickly. For most instruments, when the voices are used up and another note is ...


0

In addition to other ways of separating the two, I've also heard guitarists playing scales in thirds, playing (C-E-D-F-E-G-F-A... one after the other). They seem to call that playing the C major scale in thirds, but I'm not sure exactly how widespread that phrasing is.


1

I guess: Regarding the piano scale-in-thirds will mean thirds played with one hand scales-a-third-apart played with both hands.


2

Is it common to combine multiple voices in one piano staff... Yes, but stem directions should be used to indicate separate voices and rests should be used so that each voice has complete rhythm values for a measure. ...that might not even fit the time signature? If the rhythm values for a voice don't fit the measure, that's a notation error. I'll ...


1

Other answers have made a good case for the common interpretation. I have always thought that the ideal should approximate two independent voices played by different people. That can be particularly difficult for a player of "amateur abilities," but I encourage you not to give up. I despaired of ever being able to achieve that, but with some practice (...


1

It would help if you explain a bit about the notation you provided. Where did it come from what exactly is it transcribing from the song? There aren't any lyrics, it it an instrumental part? Etc, etc, etc. Why make us guess at all these points? I assume this is your transcription of the main melody sans lyrics. If that is the case, one point up front: I don'...


5

It's not uncommon for melodies to include notes that aren't in the chord, especially on weak beats of the bar. The article linked is not really a good way to understand popular music or jazz music (and my common practice music theory isn't really good enough to give an appraisal of it's usefulness to analyse classical music in an explanatory way). The ...


-1

This is the progression i-V-iii-IV. It is something similar as the often used phrygian cadence. As we have this progression in the ear you can indeed improvise anything above in the modal scale with no chromatics but diatonic and pentatonic. My first suspicion was that the notated key is wrong. But here we have the full accompaniment: Attention - Charlie ...


1

I agree with you that it's not optimal to move the thumb down to play the A. I would use my second finger there the same way it's written in the second measure. Then I would play the A and the D with 2 and 5 before moving my hand to start the second measure. One advantage of this way is that you don't have to learn different fingerings for each of the first ...


1

This passage of music is more modal than tonal. What this means is that the harmony is directional. Traditionally, tonal music travels from tonic to dominant and back. This section of four chords repeated is harmonically static. For instance, tonal music will often use a major V chord even in minor, but this piece uses the minor v chord, which doesn't have ...


0

A tie is always going to join two (or more) notes that are the same note. Usually across a bar line, but sometimes within the same bar. But always the same note pitch. Those lines would be way too long for ties! As Richard states, they are from the beginning to the end of a phrase. It's like each note is a syllable or word, and it's all said in one breath. ...


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