New answers tagged

1

You COULD hop the 4th finger directly from C to F♯. But the finger change and implied change of hand position makes hitting the F♯ much more secure. This is what the finger change is for in this case, not to facilitate a legato. Your approximation in the question shows a FAR too big gap after the slurs. The gap will be minimal. The slur is more about ...


7

Notice that the slurs go away in bar 3. That's the purpose of the sempre legato. It's saying "keep playing this as in the first two measures", rather than writing slurs through the entire score. As the piece progresses, the left-hand is also intended to be sempre legato, except in the couple of places where notes are separated by rests. The ...


3

If a key sticks, we might be able to blame a change of humidity. But beware of imitating your tuner - he wasn't 'cleaning' the pin holes, he was loosening them by compressing the felt. When you depress a piano key very slowly it isn't MEANT to play a note. You have to impart enough velocity to 'throw' the hammer at the string. I suspect a more resonant ...


8

Yes. A full-range arpeggio flourish with sustain pedal might run out of notes, but I don't think you'll find it a practical limitation. Incidentally, be wary of polyphony numbers on electric keyboards. 48-polyphony might mean only 24 notes if a layered sound - piano/strings maybe - is selected. Your CDP-130 can do this. But I think you can expect 48 ...


4

As already pointed out, the song itself is in 4/4 time. However, in the original animated movie, Beauty and the Beast are dancing a waltz — or at least something very waltz-like. Dance scene from the 1991 movie Waltzes are indeed in 3/4 time. Dance set to Johann Strauss's "Blue Danube" Waltz ...


4

“Beauty and the Beast” in its standard form is a pop ballad in 4/4 time, not a waltz. However, many times in musicals and musical theater they will do an alternate version of a song with a different feel and tempo. Sometimes it is for background music or a dance scene or a reprise. There is a waltz section in 3/4 time in this version of the song for a dance ...


-7

a chord is kind of a logic, or a universal; it's an endless series because the chromatic nature of notes is 'regular' it will repeat ad infinum by doubling the frequencies of its parts whatever they are. i found CmM11b5b9 !! any unique chord combines only enough intervals from only 1 chromatic bass note & the notation used for a chord contains the bass ...


7

Chord is the broad category and triad is a specific kind of chord. The simultaneous sounding of multiple tones makes chords. Here is a quote from Elie Siegmeister's Harmony and Melody... Harmony had its roots in the chord - a group of tones sounded simultaneously. Even more importantly chords are conceptual, you need to analyze music to determine which ...


7

All triads are chords. Not all chords are triads. Triads are 3 note chords generally constructed by taking every other note of a scale, such as C,E,G or D,F,A. The notes in a triad do not have to be played in any particular order. For example from low to high it can be C,G,E. A chord can have as few as 2 or many more than 3 notes in it. There are many ...


6

The basic accepted definition of a chord is minimum three separate notes.Some would be happy saying two. Thus a triad is a chord. However, chords can have more than three separate (named) notes. So, triads are chords, but chords may not be triads. The most used triads are 1,3 and 5. Translating in key C to C, E, and G. There are four different types of ...


4

Your friend seems to be confusing 'suspend' and 'sustain'. Here's more than you probably want to know about suspensions. Consider an F major chord followed by a C major chord. Let's root them both on C. So we've got C, F, A followed by C, E, G. The F falls to E, the A falls to G. Now, suppose we hang on to the F a bit longer, delaying its move to E. ...


2

A suspended chord is one which loses its 3rd, and has a P4 played instead.(Sus 4). Often, that 3rd is lost in favour of a 2nd, which then re-names the chord 'suspended' (sus2). In reality, though, that chord should be named a retardation -(ret 2). The suspended note sometimes is what's left of the previous harmony, but doesn't necessarily have to be. There ...


3

"Suspended chord" means the same thing on piano that it means elsewhere: it is a chord whose components are derived from the common-practice harmony technique of suspension, in which a chord tone from the previous chord is held over for a while. For example, there might be three chords, F major, G major, C major. When the chord changes to G major,...


1

If the question was that if you can effectively tune a piano with a cheap software, the answer is no. The inharmonicity of the piano strings makes it so that a tuning software has to calculate the right amount of stretch for the octaves if you want them to sound in tune. The other thing is that you will also have to learn the know how and use the pitch ...


6

This line helps the eye track the melody across different clefs, instruments, or voices. Here indicates the melody moving from the high voice in the bass clef to the low voice in the tenor clef. In piano scores, the marking is intended to guide phrasing. For example, this melody bit should probably be "brought out" - it is unlikely that the ...


2

The ideas presented here are based on the same principle as presented in How to avoid stopping when I play a wrong note on the piano. I recommend reading that answer in addition to this one, possibly before reading this one. The core of the problem Problems like this one are often attributed to muscle memory, and physical solutions are the typical ...


4

Very down-to-earth and an answer from experience, play the piece really slowly and correctly. It might be really irritating and boring. But do it at least twenty times correctly. Then slowly increase the tempo little by little. Your muscles will automatically overwrite its memory A common misconception is that practicing a piece at a high tempo will make you ...


0

There are quite a few free archives of piano music. One is Todotango which has many tangos from about 1890 to current styles in sheet music form; tango composers really liked to use different accompaniment styles in the same piece. Another is IMSLP which is mainly classical. It's useful as the classical composers (for piano) used many accompaniment styles ...


6

Start from an assumption that the 'normal' construction of a chord is to have all the notes as close as possible - basically a 'pile of 3rds'. Take the second-highest note, drop it an octave. That's Drop 2 voicing. Third-highest - well, you get the idea! Drop 2 fits the layout of a guitar rather well. Here's a nice discussion of it in guitar-specific ...


-2

Muscle memory is forever but you can overwrite it. However, it is always there waiting to resurface especially when we are cold or nervous. That is why things can go haywire during a performance because we let the old hardwired movements take over and anarchy reigns. This is also where injury can occur because as you improve your technique, the old ...


2

I can probably relate this to something more "native" to stackexchange. This sounds like it is not all that different from switching from Vi text editor to Emacs text editor, for a person who uses both. I can speak from some experience on that topic. Both editors are effectively controlled exclusively by use of keyboard shortcuts, which often ...


10

There's a practice technique called "building a bridge". I bet you can play m7 on its own just fine. The challenge is to bridge over that measure: to get from m6 to m8 without falling in a hole. What you need is secure foundations on either side. The problem isn't m7 itself, it's something in your state of mind as you approach it. Try this: ...


8

Richard's answer is excellent; I just wanted to add a small note to expand on it. I encourage you to think about the physicality of the passage. To mistakenly jump to the Eb requires you move your left hand several notes down the keyboard, while the correct change from B to Bb is only a half step. Surely by now you know the passage from memory. For a bit, do ...


1

Yes. As both a music professor, a violinist (non-pro) and the owner of an online music school business where we have dozens of great online violin instructors. I can honestly say that as long as the bandwidth is there and as long as headphones and Zoom are used you can accomplish a lot in an online violin lesson. As a person with previous experience in music ...


0

Your question is likely to get closed, because it really is about diagnosing a physical problem. But, I happen to be 52 myself, and once had lower back pain too. My first thought is it's aging. Maybe there isn't anything else except playing piano that bothers your mid-back... right now. That could change in time. This pain while playing may just be the first ...


0

Difficult without a video! But, just measured my elbow height/keybed, and the lowest part of my elbows is a good couple of inches higher. That says maybe you're using your back muscles to raise your shoulders, thus arms more than you need. Try the seat up a couple of inches. As a tallish guy, that should help at least. Good luck - don't slouch, but equally, ...


27

You may be interested in checking out some of the pedagogy of Arnold Jacobs, the long-time tuba player of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. I know this seems unrelated to your question, but he discussed at length the role of muscle memory in musical performance and how to overcome issues related to it. One of his big concepts was that you can't really unlearn ...


1

In addition to Richard's answer, another reason for not jumping straight to the C and landing on it with thumb is that in doing so, some players will just hit it too hard, and make it too pronounced. (Think about learning scales - a lot of us dropped onto the thumb notes too heavily). So, by using 4, holding it and transferrring to thumb, it takes away that ...


0

In her (more recent) performance here: I get the impression/idea that she's playing the passage by playing two "standard" arpeggios in each hand, split a step apart. I don't think that's what she's actually doing, but it gave me the idea. I've written out the sheet music: which you can play here: https://flat.io/...


5

The 4–1 in the Beethoven indicates that you begin playing that C with your fourth finger, but while playing the C you switch to the first finger. The switch is to help facilitate the upcoming leap to F♯; now that your first finger is on the C, it's easier to reach the F♯ with finger four. (Without the switch, you'd keep 4 on the C and use 5 on the F♯!) Also, ...


1

Forzando fz and subito piano sp seem to be the two markings for what you describe, at least by definition. An isolated - "sudden" - loud or soft dynamic. But, I also seem to remember, from long ago, a teacher telling me to just use basic dynamic marks. So, something like setting mf at the beginning, then for the soft accents put p, then immediately ...


-2

Umm... What about > over a note? A sudden decrescendo? EDIT: It's <>!!! Sources: Musescore3


1

It depends 100% on the song you're trying to learn, your own skill, and your own perception of the word "perfect". Take Chopin's Waltz in a minor. It is quite easy to learn, but harder to get "perfect". Compare this performance with this. The first one is played "perfectly", while the other one is just a computer playing. The ...


3

The high piano chords can be left out. Even better, they would be played in a lower octave — the same as the melody. This can actually be done somewhat more easily on guitar in this case. Moving the chords lower to accommodate the range of the guitar would actually make for a more accurate presentation of the original, since the melody and chords are in ...


3

Perfect is unobtainable. I mean in the philosophical sense. In general use "perfect" means some very high level of performance. As a hobby, amateur pianist (both of us, I'm an amateur too) I think it doesn't make sense to think about perfection. To play very well, yes. But, "perfection" seems contradictory to being an amateur. ...


6

You asked three questions: How long does it take to get to "perfect," How do I, and Why should I? Let's take them out of order, and first take some time to get a working definition of "perfect." It's true, "perfect" isn't really a useful goal. It's as if astrophysicists ask "how long until we've learned everything we ...


1

It's going to depend a lot on what your (or the piano player's) target is. If it's to perform pieces at a concert in front of the public, if it's to be used in an examination situation, if it's just to experience a certain composer's style, if it's just to give the player a sense of satisfaction, etc. 'Perfect' in music is way too subjective. I might play a ...


2

For number 2: In general any finger can cross over any other finger. Of course in some cases there will not be possible to do it completely legato but if you are quick the gap will not be audible and it will sound legato. Over the fifth finger you can cross the thumb below the fifth to the next (or second next) white key and can cross the thumb over the ...


10

Phrase marks here rather than slurs. (How would you slur the first four notes?)Yes, in this case where the melody moves between the staves, the phrase applies to the whole melody. But you'd phrase the entire melody that way whether the phrase mark was there or not. But don't try to dissect this sort of writing too minutely. How shall we play those last ...


5

The slurs in this case are serving as phrase markings; notice that they correspond to the punctuation of the lyrics. They also indicate legato playing, and they are intended to apply to both hands. In measures 5 and 6 in particular, the idea is to keep a legato connection of the melody as its notes shift between hands. This arrangement of the song employs a &...


2

Deliberately changing pedal before a new phrase can sometimes result in something not entirely dissimilar to when a choir collectively breathes before a barline - e.g., it can easily create a somewhat stilted/mechanical effect. I'd guess the written pedal marks are an attempt (presumably by an editor and not Chopin) to avoid that to some degree, though my ...


2

Up-down as each chord is played. A subtle lift at the end of each phrase is not a ridiculous idea, but I don't think it's needed here. Rubinstein legato-pedals through. So do all the other YouTube versions I just looked at. That's good enough for me.


3

I've had the Jazz Piano Book for 30 years and just started looking at it very slowly and just a little bit at a time. I think it is a great book. There is just a huge amount of material that is presented in a very compressed manner so taking it very slowly and methodically is helpful. For instance - in one chapter on melodic minor chords he shows 5 different ...


0

I was tought to use the 5:th finger on white keys, but to use the 4:th finger on black keys. Note that this applies for both hands.


0

'I have absolutely no idea how to finger things like this'. Trouble is, 'things like this' will be different for each and every piece. An answer will really only be appropriate for 'this' excerpt. Generally, we finger notes in the way we find is best/most effective. That means attempting to keep our available fingers encompassing as many of the notes needed ...


2

The usual way is to hold the pedal down to sustain one chord, then play the next, and after that next has been played, change pedal. Rather like the sign shows - the 'pedal up/down' comes directly after the next chord is played, not before or as it's played. Slowing it all down a lot will allow understanding of the actual timing - it's an aquired art ! By ...


6

Fingerings for the posted examples As a starting point, here is the fingering I'd recommend for each example, and why. Example 1: consecutive thirds, fourths, fifths This fingering allows my hands to comfortably and simultaneously lay over all of their notes in the entire measure. That way, I can play the whole measure without any jumping around. Put ...


2

Don't get too hung up on fingering rules. Your hands are not Rachmaninoff's or Brahms', so there's no reason you should play everything just as they do. You can try a few different combinations yourself, considering: -how easy it feels -how accurate you play (not stumbling or missing notes, especially repeated notes -how the fingering brings out the ...


6

Ultimately, this is a musical decision, so either way is fine. However,... If you want to play the music literally as written, then you would hold the pedal through, so that there's no break between the two slurred passages. My personal preference, both in this simplified arrangement as well as the original, is to leave a small break — a "breath" — ...


Top 50 recent answers are included