New answers tagged

1

I also think, the answer depends. But since I may be an unusual sight-reader I will describe my sight reading. My personal skill level I would say, I am kind of good in sight reading. I sight read classical pieces (e.g. Beethoven Sonatas) nearly in tempo, romantic pieces (e.g. Chopin Balades) in half tempo when sight reading. Clearly, I omit a lot of notes ...


2

There's no straightforward answer here, it'll depend on certain factors. When we run, we look further ahead than when we walk, and faster usually means further still. So, primarily, it depends how fast we need to play. Sometimes at fast tempos, we'll look ahead at least to the end of the line or phrase - rather like if we read a story out loud, we need to ...


0

Did you hear about the Taubman Approach to Piano Playing? That is EXACTLY what you ask for: HOW to play the piano and HOW to play specific technical elements (broken octaves, octaves, scales, double thirds, staccato, legato and so on). All these things are specific skills you need as a pianist. I am a professional pianist myself, by the way. The Taubman ...


8

When you are sight-reading, how far ahead in the music do you look? This is highly individual and depends on the complexity of the music. Taking myself as an example, when reading very basic music, I can read, say, four measures at a time. For most music I can only read one or two at a time, and for complex music, it could be as little as a few notes. On the ...


0

It sounds like spiral review, or repertoire maintenance, would fit you to a T. When it's gotten boring, set it aside for a while, and then spend a few days with it again from time to time. In this way you would spend a portion of your practice time most days, reviewing repertoire.


2

This question will likely be closed because gear recommendations are not considered on topic in this forum. I will try and address some of your concerns to help you make a good choice for yourself without recommending a specific instrument. As you probably know you have 4 keyboards listed but only 2 types of keyboards. A MIDI controller and 3 digital pianos. ...


2

I own the Alfred edition of the Inventions, and it has notes on bar 13... The embellishment is a trill not a mordant. Alfred solves the "problem" with parenthesis around the R.H. Eb4 to show it will not be played literally, as the L.H. will play it on the down beat. After that initial Eb4 in the L.H. the rest of the notes for the two hands do not ...


2

To get one thing straight: What you are talking about is not a mordent but a trill, which basically means: Then when Bach wrote this instruments (like big Harpsichords) often had two manuals. The reason for this is to allow for some tonal differentiation. On a big harpsichord one can get two manuals which allows to pluck the strings in different positions ...


1

Just play the ornament. The repetition of the Eb won't interrupt the overall melodic flow of the upper voice. The other repetitions — the Ds at the end of beat 2, the RH Eb on the "and" of 3, and the Cs at the end of beat 3 — can all be played as written, with LH first and RH following. As one example of many, here is Glenn Gould's recording (timed ...


-2

It's a direct transition and it happens on the C major chord. If you want to learn more about optimum smoothness into transitions you should learn about hexatonic scales. But in this case the reason D to G transitions smoothly is because it differs in notes by 1 note C# to C as G major is also D mixolydian. Of the major modes it would take 4 transitions D ...


1

I see it as when you write or read or even speak a word so many times it looses meaning, try rearranging or adding a few extra notes to make it sound cool, like a few grace notes here and there or try a different chord in the left hand, play around with it. One of the points in jazz I have learned is that it doesn't have to look exactly like the sheet music. ...


1

You build relationships with pieces. Just like a woman is not going to appreciate you taking her out just to ignore her. You spend a lot of time getting pieces to a concert level. If practice is boring for you then this may not be the hobby for you. It is how musicians pay there dues and learn there artistic skill. There is no escaping practice.


2

What is an example song, and the particular sheet music you've used? Most pop song sheet music is arrangements for piano and not real piano parts. Those particular arrangements hold no special place as the only, or correct way to play "the song." You can do your own "arrangement" of a song, either rehearsed or spontaneously. With most ...


2

Another point is to play many of the Part I exercises in several/many different keys (rather than just all "in C"). This benefits both finger adeptness, and muscle memory of more keys. Also, playing sometimes staccato, sometimes legato, and with variations in emphasis. Forcibly converting some of the exercises to 3/4 rather than 4/4 is an ...


0

The problem you have trying to play a conventional piece on a bad piano is that there will be a disjoint between your body language - dramatic hair tosses and impassioned facial expressions and the actual sound produced. So I'd suggest make your performance more theatrical, and move the focus away from the sound that the piano makes. Here are some ...


4

A couple of things spring to mind. Get yourself so much better at sightreading that you can pick up the sheet music, and play it perfectly first time - not kidding - many players do this. That will alleviate the boredom that sets in when one has to play the same piece hudreds of times to perfect it. Once you can play it really well, there are several options....


1

This is kind of an abstract meta-answer... feel free to downvote. Musical notation is a form of written language about musical ideas from people to people. Who is your target audience? How do they interpret what you're saying with the notation? I understand your question so that you're having problems even yourself - none of the chords symbols you could ...


0

When I play very complex tunes, you can't hear everything going on because of all the previous mentioned issues. Simply put, it sounds like a jumble of notes. Like @Andy Bonner said, some pieces just can't be adequately played in a big, empty room. The reason is the reverberation. This is a property of the room and not of the instrument. There is such a ...


9

Having accompanied high-school kids in music contests for a number of years, and played on atrocious pianos, both in practice rooms and for the performance, I feel your pain. :) I was certainly not attempting any sort of solo work... and might have refused, if offered. My approach to needing to play effectively and reliably on an unfamiliar but lousy piano (...


3

How to mark the passages Sforzando and related markings apply only to individual notes, so the single sffz on two adjacent notes within the same measure is technically incorrect, and I personally would find it confusing. Consider a sub ff followed by a separate marking to return to the prevailing dynamic. That would be unambiguous, especially with the other ...


2

If you want sffz on two notes, I'm afraid you have to write it twice. Some would say sffz and a staccato dot were contradictory. An alternative might be ff with an accent and tenuto line on each note.


12

I'll present one more approach that hasn't been mentioned so far: sometimes you have to choose your program based on the setting. As a violinist, I'm lucky enough to be able to always bring my preferred instrument along with me, but even the acoustics of the space might influence my choice of pieces. I'm not going to play "Flight of the Bumblebee" ...


6

You need to stand your ground on this one. If you've already pointed out the shortfalls, and it's fallen on deaf ears, then there's definitely a problem. You need to be present when it's next tuned - to discuss with the tuner what reparations are necessary, or whether it's on its last legs. If it's nearly dead, there are a couple of options. Encourage the ...


1

Some of the people you mention are not necessarily bebop "masters", but bebop INVENTORS. To me, you cannot master something that does not exist. Everyone after them is trying to master what they invented, we are copycats to a degree. They studied everything but what specifically would differ from person to person. I've read that many of these ...


2

The Henle urtext1 gives f♯ and includes no commentary on this pitch — that is, Henle seems to feel there is no question surrounding that note. The manuscript versions2 also give f♯ In addition, f♯ makes harmonic sense — it's the root of an f♯7 chord, which reinforces the cadence on b major on the downbeat of the following measure. 1 Chopin, Etudes op. 10 (...


0

"Playing songs by ear" is not a single skill - it's an effect of multiple different skills. They are, to a certain degree, interchangeable - you can rely more on ear, more on theory, more on just knowing the style of music etc,; you will not get a one-size-fits-all, but I can share my experience. In the late 80s I was a pupil of a music school, ...


1

The best way to learn almost anything is by engaging with a competent, professional teacher, whether privately one-on-one or classroom style. There are myriad other ways to learn things. And there are some teachers who are not very good, which can make it seem like teachers are not always the best way. But a good teacher is irreplaceable.


4

G7sus/D is probably the most useful description. Why are you using chord symbols? As an attempt at harmonic analysis, or as an aid to sight-reading? When naming a chord results in something as complicated as Dm7(add4)(no5), isn't it simpler to just read the notes? (And anyway, as far as harmonic analysis goes, there IS a 5th, prominently repeated in the ...


2

There can't be one best method. You want to read music well, and also play by ear. They're very different skills, and most players are much better at one or the other. Out of the hundreds of musos I've played with, only a handful - on any instruments - are adept at both. Learning to sightread. The theory involved is the timing value of notes, and reading ...


2

Functional analysis and voicing rules (G resolves to A) are time bound and not universal. So you are free to name the chord as you like. All we can say is that G is surely not A♭♭! Most logically seems to me to call it a secondary dominant of G e.g. like Dm is ii-V or D is V/G). (Even I know we are in D-Dorian! Thats the way I listen to it in d-Dorian as ...


3

I head the D-bass and the remaining notes as distinct here. So I'd describe it as stacking an Fsus2 chord on top of D in the first bar. That also takes care for the fact that the G resolves upwards, although when it does resolve the chord is not F anymore but rather F♯o.


6

I would probably go with the original purpose of chord symbols, which is not theoretical analysis but rather to tell the guitarist and bassist what to play, call it G7sus4/D, and not worry about it any more than that. Harmonic analysis is a subjective topic about which reasonable people can reasonably disagree, and if your main purpose is to prepare ...


6

Naming chords isn’t always an exact science, especially when they are not just a series of stacked thirds. Also, keys and modes are somewhat irrelevant to chord symbols with the exception of correct enharmonic spelling within a key (ex. F#m7 in the key of E instead of Gbm7) As for your choice #1, I understand what you mean that it sounds like a suspension of ...


1

I have found it a revelation to learn the chord and improvisation way of learning a song. Improvisation is the critical word. I think what you mean is learning how to improvise rhythmic patterns that fit chord progressions. Why don't piano teachers teach that? Because most of them are preparing students for piano recitals where you're judged by some notion ...


1

...Any way of spotting where you land, etc? Using your I V example... ...that rhythm notation is a bit contrived, but I'm trying to approximate the idea of holding down the common piano key as a way to concentrate on it as the "spot" to target. Literally striking that common key with a quarter note while releasing the other fingers with the ...


0

6 months into singing. The majority of folk will start singing when quite young, even as a bit of fun, and develop that as they get older. Not many will wake up one morning and think 'I need to learn how to sing, not having sung a note previously!'. Right now, you seem to need to watch as notes on the piano are played, and realise that those further to the ...


-3

As an addendum to other great answers: Playing "chords and melody" can be a lot of fun and discovering it can be a thrill, but it's not actually something that ever gets played by any sort of pianist in practice. Classical pianists - don't play chords and melody. This one is obvious. Pop/Rock pianists never (!) play chords and melody - that would ...


1

Yes, as in other comments and answers, there is a distance between various genres and their performance styles. One aspect that is "beyond chords", and relevant to both classical and jazz, is "voicing" of chords, that is, a choice of notes to express that chord, but/and fitting smoothly (as in "voice leading" and such) with ...


1

To add some "weight" to the answers that say this means each note is played twice, here's an example from a G&S score. You can see they explicitly wrote in the "slash" so you know there are two notes to be played per written flag. I agree that the OP's example is already pretty crowded, so sticking in the slashes is pretty much ...


1

Ear training is not the real issue based on your question and description. If you can go to an instrument and find notes your ear is not bad. I have had this issue, recently starting classical voice lessons after 45 years of playing guitar, violin, and classical bass. I can hear a lick and immediately find it on the guitar, I can identify chords, ...


1

Make sure you have a good posture, get good fingerings, and practice. An important thing is knowing when to jump. For example, you can switch from C major to 2nd inversion F major by just moving 2 fingers A good way to practice chord jumps is just playing a major / minor scale and adding a major / minor third and a perfect fifth, like this Once you can do ...


2

Here's another way to look at the issue. As you say, you were able to throw together your arrangement for "All of Me" in minutes. And it wasn't hard, was it? Someone with no musical background and no piano instruction probably couldn't do this, but you could. I have a hunch that that background and that instruction were more useful to you than you'...


3

What you need is ear training. The main skills are: ability to recognize what you hear (intervals, chords, rhythms, melodies) ability to sing something you hear (e.g. repeat the notes or a melody you hear, repeat rhythm) ability to sing something you haven't heard before, e.g. by reading it from a music score It is normally part of education in music ...


3

I'm afraid I'll have to play devil's advocate, too. Arguably, you never actually learn how to play a piece from its lead sheet (melody + chords). You learn the melody, yes. You learn how to harmonize it, yes. But you never learn precisely how to play the accompaniment (was it straight 8ths block chords, or was I supposed to add syncopation?), so unless you ...


11

Devil's advocate: would most of us go along to a classical concert and enjoy a pianist playing a rough approximation of, say, Moonlight Sonata, a Bach fugue, et al? Somewhat doubtful - the jazzers amongst us might love it, but the purists might walk out. The answer is - what does one go to a piano teacher for? It was always the case - say up to 50 years ago -...


-3

You do not need to learn theory to learn an instrument. You can enjoy learning and playing pieces, even improvise by ear. But theory is interesting in its own right. I have benefited from learning theory and enjoy seeing the patterns that naturally exist in music. I would also point out that what you are referring to is likely Western Music Theory. ...


3

You could argue that any notation can only ever be an approximation of "what a piece should actually sound like", but reducing a whole arrangement to a sequence of chords is quite an extreme data reduction - you're looking at a very abstract form of what's actually being played. Before the advent of recording (and the distribution of those ...


47

Just like there's pop, rock, folk, jazz, metal, etc. guitar, there are many different disciplines of piano playing, each with a different set of required skills: classical piano pop piano jazz piano I consider these as separate subjects, and in music schools there's usually a separation between at least classical and pop/rock/jazz. Additionally, you might ...


13

Piano teachers routinely teach chord-reading, just not the teachers you studied with, it seems. Teachers who focus on jazz and popular music are the most likely, since chord charts (sheet music) are most common in those genres. Teachers who focus on classical music often have not themselves learned to read chord charts, though this is changing. But the ...


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