New answers tagged

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Body position Sitting so that your body is (more or less) centered on the keyboard is best. I cheat very slightly to the right, because that's comfortable for me. To play the passage in mm. 107-108, I lean out quite far to the left (lean, but not shift where I'm seated) and step my left foot out to help keep my balance. I keep my body square to the keyboard (...


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Here is your manual: https://www.musikkhandel.no/media/files/2496/p45_en_om_a0.pdf According to your manual you have a headphone jack on the keyboard itself which deactivates the speakers so if you only want to hear the keyboard through headphones there is no need to go thorough the computer, all you need is a pair of headphones that have a 1/4” jack or a 1/...


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The brain is very quick to adapt to varying weights and sizes of keys. The first thing though is to have an ergonomic technique. Then the brain can make the proper adjustments to abduction, weight and elbow movement. If there are flaws in your technique your brain won't be able to overcome the differences. It is like walking barefoot, with heavy boots, in ...


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Without knowing that particular model, I'd guess you probably need "full volume" to properly match an acoustic. If you ever try actually accompanying people live in a 'gig' situation, you will quickly discover a digital piano just cannot reach the levels you can with an acoustic, without further amplification. Pianos are pretty loud. That doesn't ...


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I think it's different from person to person, depends on how opened we are, how adaptable to different things. Most people I know, doesn't have any problems switching from one to another, and even different instruments. I just bought a Roll up piano for my boyfriend's birthday gift. It has 81 tones, a little bit smaller tiles than standard piano, but with a ...


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It will be the same as when you are climbing up 2 stairs with different degrees of steps. If the difference of the steps inside the scale are equal but different between the two stairs you'll be easily adapting the new distance when climbing the other stair. But when the distance is changing on the same stair you will stumble and struggle like a wanderer ...


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can you switch easily between normal and mini key sizes like it was two different instruments, or do you feel that your playing on a real piano is badly impacted with the bad habits you constructed playing on the mini keyboard? I haven't noticed anything bad caused by playing mini keyboards. Mini keys are a little awkward to play, so I won't try to play any ...


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The ABRSM 2021–2022 Piano Syllabus applies the following scale speeds for each exam grade, with all scales played in eighth-notes.1 Image source (PDF page 16) Initial: quarter-note = 54 Grade 1: quarter-note = 60 Grade 2: quarter-note = 66 Grade 3: quarter-note = 80 Grade 4: quarter-note = 100 Grade 5: half-note = 60 Grade 6: half-note = 72 Grade 7: half-...


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The reason I would use a fingering like this is to place the longer finger (4) on the black key (G♯) — the leading edge of which is further away from the body than those of the white keys — and let the shorter finger (5) handle the white key (Fx = G). This has the advantage of allowing my hand to relax (contract) a bit on the A-Fx pair rather than leaving it ...


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I'll opine that you can play most with the same fingering but obviously elbow, rotations, in/out, up, down and shifting movements will change drastically. I do not condone the use of Hanon for technique. Technique comes from moving properly and obeying the laws of physics, not a book. If you can't do something at the piano, you need an adjustment to how ...


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You should play whatever speed you can with completely (completely, though!) relaxed hands. Except for the base of the finger being played, there should be no more muscular tension than if the hand was just sitting on a desk. When you start to speed up, there's a tendency to "try-hard," which interferes with the passing of the thumb and makes ...


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Hanon exercises are designed to be played on white keys, and it was not Hanon's intention they be transposed. However, transposing them can be an excellent exercise, in which case it's up to you how to finger them. My personal preference is to use the same fingering in all keys because of the variety of "problems" it presents as the configuration ...


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You seem to have a misconception of chord inversion. The term inversion refers to the bass note and as the bass tone is always A all iv chords are in root position, that is: every chord here is in root position Em,Am,B7,A because the bass tone is the root note of all chords. If you look at the r.h. only, the triads are "inverted" but we don't ...


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Because the bass notes are always the same, technically each chord is in the same inversion. However, the right hand in this case can really be thought of as practicing the chords in all inversions.


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Inversions are determined by the bass note of the chord. The chord third in the bass is a first inversion, chord fifth, second inversion, chord seventh third inversion, etc. Sometimes the top harmony note will be mentioned but that harmonically doesn't make much difference. (It may make a big difference in playing though and in the sound.) Inversions are ...


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Any chord remains the same chord regardless the order or position of its notes. So A-C-E is always A minor -- and thus the iv chord in this context -- no matter what pitch is on the bottom, middle, or top. As long as the only pitches involved are A-C-E, it's A minor. The inversion of the chord is determined by the lowest pitch. In the case of A minor, A ...


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I play piano in music class and I have legs that are too long for the piano I play, so I adjust my legs in a way for them to be comfortable and so that I can push the pedals. It made me uncomfortable at first to put my legs underneath the piano but now I can sit at the piano all day.


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Tie and phrase marks look remarkably similar. The difference is usually that tie marks tie together notes of the same pitch, often across barlines,(as it may seem here), while phrase marks will inevitably have a number of notes under them, with the start and finish notes being different. Here, in the eight bars shown, the 3rd/4th and 7th/8th are definitely ...


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Those aren't ties. They're phrasing marks. In the first case, it IS kind of confusing, since the arc goes to the same note. Anyway, don't worry about it too much. The rests pretty much force you to group the notes properly.


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The intro to this song plays the notes of a whole tone scale. The whole tone scale is used as a kind of cliché in theatre and film to represent imagination or dreaming/daydreaming. For example, Interestingly, the whole tone scale's modes are all also whole tone scales, so a cluster played in that way may not have any ...


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I think the performer in the video you linked had a nice solution: for the regular "x" noteheads, he just taps his hand against the fallboard. Then, for the notated "glissando," he seems to scrape his nails along the fallboard until the end of the measure. The nails create a different sound quality than the hand taps, and by extending the ...


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To the title- yes. For any given melody, there will usually be several different chords that will sound good under it. If you know F7 (or FMaj7) sounds good under it, then chords that share notes with FMaj7, such as Am, are likely candidates to also sound good under it. To the question in the body, it depends what your goal is. If you want to play the ...


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Keep the F in the left hand. The melody would generally be moving more than its harmonic counterpart. Many of the right-hand notes would not be F. Something needs to describe FMaj7 (what I believe you really meant) consistently. Otherwise, you would be right in saying that it's A-Minor.


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The problem is that an eighth rest is missing from the "tenor" voice. It should be on beat 3, vertically aligned between the eighth rest in the upper staff and the F octave in the lower staff. X: 1 T: Question 113539 K: G minor M: 4/4 L: 1/16 %%score V1 | V2 | V3 V:V1 clef=treble V:V2 clef=bass middle=d V:V3 clef=bass middle=d [V:V1] [dd'][bb']2[dd'...


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Can we transform any harmonic music to melody? Most European music that has harmony uses the harmony to accompany a melody, so yes, we can play the melody by itself. In fact, you can find song books of European music that contain only the melody. These often have chord symbols that indicate the harmony without using a grand staff, but that is by no means ...


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You do need to put it somewhere. It's designed to trap into a screw or nut/bolt on the main frame, so it's properly grounded. The patterning is to prevent vibration from shaking it loose, so if you find any screw without a similar washer, that's probably the one. The only nut I can see in the image looks like a nylock, or similar 'self-trapping' design which ...


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There are a number of things you can do but the hardest is always best. First, since you know all your chords, explore the upper and lower neighbors of each chord tone. The basic C chord is CEG, so randomly experiment with the half step note below each of those notes, those are the lower neighbors. Then experiment with the upper neighbors which are a half ...


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When you check most existing melodies, you'll find that some, at least, of the notes used in any bar are chordal notes. Think about it - if the notes and the chord didn't blend, or match, then either the notes or the chord (possibly both!) will be wrong! The main note in any bar is generally the one on the first beat. Since that beat is more emphasised than ...


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The human hand naturally places the thumb on a white key, the 2nd and 3rd fingers on black keys, and the rest on either. An Arpeggio designed in the reverse of that pattern would be the most difficult.


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Any key signature, whether it has sharps or flats, dictates which notes will be affected subsequently in that piec, until cancelled or suspended. On piano (tagged), they will generally change a white key into a black one. Accidentals are temporary changes to any note. They may be naturals (♮) which make an already sharp or flat note revert to a white key, or ...


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The natural sign has no effect on what came before. It does affect any Fs afterward (but see below), but only until the end of the measure. Once the next measure begins, the F# comes back into force. The natural sign only affects Fs on the same line or space as the one where the natural sign occurs. If there's another F in the same measure, but on a ...


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According to a music theory channel I have been following, one way to make your chord sound more colorful and interesting is to not think of a chord as triads or sevenths with extensions, but as collection of notes from a certain scale played together. For instance, a major chord could be constructed by picking notes from the Lydian or the Ionian mode. So ...


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Learning how to practice effectively is an important part of learning an instrument. So many people just play through a piece of music as best they can and hope that they will get better with repetition. But if you do this then you are just 'practicing your mistakes'. To get better you need to avoid making those mistakes in the first place. This probably ...


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As a beginner, i would recommend practicing the four-note chords as they are much more common than you might think. Its best to get into good habits early on so you dont end up making things harder for yourself. However thats not to say that doing what you suggested is not acceptable. A lot of the time the most logical thing fingering-wise is the right one.


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Yes, humidity can affect keys but I suspect your question is deeper than that. Dynamics come from the speed at which you strike the key. If you are having problems playing softly, you are not feeling the weight of your arms nor the pull and your arms resistance to gravity. Play a chord and very slowly play down into the keys from the hinge of your elbow. ...


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Provided you can reach more easily, yes. It will sound the same, and that's what matters.


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Yes. It's VERY common for internal voices to swap back and forth between the hands. I'd say in more advanced music, this is the norm rather than the exception. But you'd have to show the music for us to say whether it's a good idea in this particular case.


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Humidity is the death of a piano. I hope you're not talking about a grand piano. Humidity can cause wood and leather to swell or soften, which could most definitely affect the feel, sound and action of the piano. I very strongly recommend closing windows and running a de-humidifier.


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According to TOO MARVELOUS FOR WORDS: The Life and Genius of Art Tatum by James Lester (1994,) some of Art Tatum's direct influences were James P. Johnson, Willie (The Lion) Smith, Earl Hines, and Fats Waller. He was also a fan of Lee Sims and, likely, Luckey Roberts... all of these musicians played ragtime and more than one of them are accredited with the ...


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I’ve recently begun to think that the direction to “play together, then play hands separately” can more often be odd and mistaken than helpful. To be sure, it can be helpful, but without proper context, it’s just… confusing. After all, isn’t most piano music written to assume that the musician will be using both hands? So, while I would not discount your ...


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Learning is context-related. For example, if you study in your bedroom with music on, then go do the test, it's possible that you might have a hard time remembering. Playing hands-separate is unusual for pianists. It seems your brain is taking timing and other memory cues from both hands together.


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Your teacher isn't likely to have broken it down to separate hands just to polish the performance. I guess you weren't playing it THAT 'OK' hands together! Sounds like you were getting through it, but with some elements missing. Perhaps you needed to go back to actually READING the music. I know the feeling!


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When learning a piece on piano, our bodies -- especially our fingers, hands, and arms -- learn the "feel" of the piece. This is called "muscle memory". It sounds like your muscle memory relies on both hands being played together. So, when you tried to play hands separately, that disrupted your memory, and the piece did not "feel"...


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Everything I have read confirms that Mick Jagger played electric piano (a Fender Rhodes) on that track. Nicky Hopkins plays piano on the track, and the string synthesizer as well. That string synthesizer is believed to be an Arp. The song (and the album black and blue was recorded between 1974 and 1975, at both Musicland Studios, Munich, West-Germany and ...


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So a technique to practice this I found useful is to consciously stop just before you play in the new position and look at your hand and adjust before you play it. This forces you to be very conscious about the new position. In the end you can reduce the gap down to nothing. I found this helped me get the muscle memory quicker.


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"Strumming" -- or, put another way, playing chords rhythmically -- has been around as long as the piano (and probably longer, but I'll stick to the piano). Working backwards... Using this kind of piano accompaniment has long been a mainstay of pop music. For example, the opening of The Beatle's "A Day in the Life" (1967) and Jerry Lee ...


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The explanation and understanding can be found in the physics of vibrating systems (and a little bit in basic definitions). A harmonic series is defined by the relationship fn = n*f1m n = 1, 2, 3, ... If f is a frequency, say 110Hz, then the harmonics are 220, 330, 440, ... etc. A "simple" wave form or signal has a single frequency in it and is ...


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You can take two approaches to this sort of problem, where the tune and the words aren't a good fit. You can take the tune as fixed and distort the words to suit it. Or you can modify the tune to suit the words. For the version of the tune you've shown us, and the traditional words, what's shown in @Edward's answer will be required. To suit the words, ...


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Look at this version of "Amazing Grace" from the Gather 3rd edition hymnal. It uses the same version of the melody as your sheet music. Link to image source


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I come across this in practice/teaching material, where for example the Primo (student) is the same melody in both hands while the Secondo (teacher) is providing the harmony. There (although aimed at students, not performers) the convention seems to be to write both hands in full and note the octave shift with 8va alta/bassa, in some modern engravings on the ...


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