New answers tagged

2

The question is confusingly worded but it sounds like you're looking for solutions to damp unwanted, unfretted strings from vibrating after the intended note duration. This is done by either left or right hand depending on the situation. Left hand - just rest a finger on the string to damp it. Right hand - rest a finger, or the palm of your hand to damp. ...


1

just play them like triplets whereby two of the 8th notes are divided in 16th: instead of da-da-da you play da-daba-daba, (or daba-daba-da) ...


8

The two As are there to indicate that the left hand is playing two (logical) voices. One has an A half note while the other has a A quarter note followed by a G quarter note. In keyboard terms, this means that you play an A on the third beat and, without releasing the A, a G on the fourth beat. Release both notes at the end of the measure. If you look at ...


1

OK. You have not given us an image (which would really help) but lets try to analyse this. So there are four 16th notes and one 8th note. The 8th note is worth two 16th notes isn't it. So you have a total of six 16th note lengths in all. Same length as three 8th notes. So you are correct that it is a sextuplet, or to think of it another way, a triplet ...


2

One thing that helped me a lot was playing the organ for my church. The organ doesn't have a sustain pedal to rely on so almost everything has to be played legato with your fingers only or it will sound disjointed and choppy. This involves a lot of interesting fingerings, and forces you to think about it a lot more. In particular, I picked up a habit of ...


12

The prototype of the Rhodes piano was created in 1942 by Harold Rhodes which he called the "Pre-Piano". According to this Rhodes soundscape generator page: Harold Rhodes was a piano teacher who had just developed a new and enjoyable way to learn to play the piano, when the Second World War grabbed him. While enrolled in the Army Air Corps, he kept ...


6

Check out the history of the creation of the Rhodes piano. To quote the article from Wikipedia: By 1942, Rhodes was in the Army Air Corps, where he created a piano teaching method to provide therapy for soldiers recovering from combat in hospital. He had to develop miniature pianos for bed use, that he made from old scrapped airplanes. So, "...


4

Why would a whole number of octaves be logical or desirable? Music doesn't cut off at octave boundaries - if a piece is in C major that doesn't mean the lowest and highest notes in it will be C. The short and sufficient answer to your question is that pianos don't have an exact number of octaves because there is no reason for them to.


28

A lot of instruments from the analog era were supposed to sound like other "real" instruments, and were as good as technology allowed then, which is not very. But over time, some have become popular in their own right. Electric pianos were indeed supposed to sound like acoustic pianos (although some manufacturers saw the potential of adding features like ...


1

I've been tuning for over 20 years and I can still find room for improvement. When I had been tuning for about 3 or 5 years, one guild member told me that it takes about 10 years to get really good. Later, when I had reached that ten year mark, I thought back to what he had told me and I thought," yep, that's about right!" BTW, I'm much better than I was 10 ...


3

Try slowing the metronome down (but still playing at full speed). because: It helps you develop your ability to keep a steady tempo; On a faster piece, some brains may find it easier to play with a metronome that is ticking every other beat (or every fourth, etc.) For example, suppose you are playing a piece that is in 4/4 time and 180 bpm. That's one ...


0

Literally, go with gravity. Rhythm and feeling music is gravity. Sway to music. Waltzes work nicely. Notice there is an up then a suspension then a down before going up again. Conduct in two. There is an up, suspension, down with gravity, suspension, up, suspension. Feel the gravity. You don't have to use any muscle to go down. That is where ...


0

Sometimes it's appropriate to use JUST arm weight - a heavy final chord in a Beethoven sonata perhaps. But sometimes it's appropriate to use JUST fingers - maybe a delicate ornament in a Baroque piece. Mostly somewhere in between. There's also hand weight, rotation... You're starting from a false premise. Fingers are fine. Either you're misinterpreting ...


4

One thing that has helped me a lot with metronome practice is to imagine the metronome playing something other than the downbeats. One example is to set the metronome to half the speed I intend to play (120bpm --> 60bpm on the metronome). With that setting, I imagine the metronome clicking on 2 and 4 (assuming 4/4 time signature). Another example is to ...


2

A more general principle: in any physical task, prefer bigger muscles to smaller ones. Chopin's etudes Op. 10 and 25 demonstrate this as, shall we say, videogame boss fights that seem impossible until you study the boss's habits and patterns. If you brute force them, your forearms are on fire after half a page. No way can you last through all five pages. ...


3

As ggcg pointed out, changing tempo throughout a piece is common practice. Where people tend to get into trouble is when tempo changes with the difficulty of a section instead of for dynamic expression. Slowing down and counting as you play (1&2&3&4&...) is a good place to start, but eventually you increase to a speed where counting isn't ...


0

Playing simultaneous trills in both hands is hardly more difficult than playing just one trill. A double trill in one hand -- Liszt -- is nastier. The pianos and pianists of Tchaikovsky's era weren't more advanced than today's. Play as few or as many notes of the trill as fit in the tempo you've chosen. (At some points in Beethoven's piano sonatas, it's ...


1

how I can play a song in different time signatures This is a textbook exercise for organists learning how to improvise variations on a hymn tune. Note, it's an exercise. The textbooks don't dictate answers. You learn how to do this by just doing it and listening to your attempts. "Amazing Grace" is a waltz. Try to play it as a march. After a few ...


0

Internalisation of the sound of the extensions is a huge help to being able to play them in real time. Not only will that allow you to audiate better and translate your thoughts into music, it will facilitate the usage of similar sounds as substitutes for improvisation. Ideally, you should be able to read G7♯11 and know a bunch of ways to play it. And ...


0

9 11 13 ... calculate minus 7 and we have 2, 4and 6 another trick is: I analyze dm7/G to reduce G479 ... imaging one triad above the other. (I know this is‘t 100% identical and maybe not absolut correct) It also helps a lot if you have the chord progressions in your ear and in your muscle memory.


0

No tricks, just practice. You spend hours practicing, reading and playing, and then you begin to associate the numbers with their musical meanings faster and faster. What comes to these add-sharp-flat-911-foo-bar monster chord symbols, the whole thing feels weird. I thought that a jazz player is supposed to see "G7" and play something completely different ...


2

Pretty well as you (and the rest of us) learned the basic chords! There's really not much more to learn. When we did the 'basics', we had maj., min., 2 or 3 7ths - and their shapes sometimes didn't seem related to eah other. So, a couple of ♭9, ♯9, ♯11 etc. shapes will keep you with enough to play to start with, just like when you started, ...


7

There are some exercises you can try. I'll share a few that work for me and I'm sure others will add (or even subtract). First of all, it is natural for people to speed up and slow down during a performance. This a natural part of the dynamics of music and we are not robots. That being said we should be able to keep a steady beat, especially if we are ...


3

As others have explained, that note is B♭, not A♯. The B♭ in the key signature applies to all B notes - regardless of position on the stave. It may help to think of the scales with a "each letter must appear only once" rule. So, for the key of F only one of the following is correct: a) F, G, A, A♯, C, D, E, F b) F, G, A, B♭, C, D, E,...


-1

This is a B flat. Technically, every flat is the sharp of is preceding note if it is not a natural half tone gap, at least within the same temperament. Thus, B flat is the same as A sharp. Also, no instrument I am aware of has distinct keys or strings for A sharp and B flat.


17

The note in the music is a B note.Of some sort, not an A of any sort! Count up, and that line will be a B. As Dom says, because of the key signature of one flat, which happens to be the note B, then that note is played as B♭. Whilst A♯ and B♭ are the same black key on the piano, they're not always the same note on other instruments - but ...


21

It's not an A♯, it's a B♭. The key signature tells you that all B's you come across are flat hence this B is flat unless otherwise stated. See the related question: Is a high A in the key of D flat still flat?


2

IMO both approaches have benefits. Sampling can more closely represent the instrument as it was recorded, at a specific point of time, a realistic snapshot as it were. Modelling can smore broadly represent the instrument as it is being played, (nuances, resonances etc), essentially more about the dynamic representations of the sound over time. ...


4

This can be done with an Acciaccatura. How it is played depends on the time period it was written in, but is largely up to the interpretation of the performer. In classical music this is often played on the beat with the rest of the chord slightly delayed and played immediately after. Sometimes, especially if the Acciaccatura falls at the end of the ...


2

You use two "voices" or "layers" or whatever your favourite notation software calls them, like this. A good notation program will get the horizontal spacing correct automatically. Whether Lilypond or Musescore are "good" by that definition, I don't know.


7

If all the stems point outward, it's easy, as you've noticed. If the note with a different duration is in the middle of the chord, you can write the noteheads slightly out of alignment so they only touch the stem that applies to them. For example, if you have, in the right hand of a piano score, a quarter note open fifth with a figure in sixteenth notes ...


4

Lighed keys are unnecessary and counterproductive. For some serious piano learning an 88 key with hammer action is essential. Entry level digital pianos made by Yamaha, Kawai, Casio, Roland, Korg are available, but you have to double the budget. A Casio CDP-S100 is the cheapest option at the 360 Euro price and could run on alkaline batteries. Roland FP10, ...


0

In my opinion, you should not consider buying a keyboard with key lights. The lights do not help in any way to learn how to play keyboard. I would even say they distract from learning because your child will only watch the light patterns and try to "catch" the right keys in the right moment. It will not understand the connection between keys and ...


1

Time signatures are used in music notation as a way to communicate metres https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metre_(music). Like you said, different metres i.e. repeating basic pulse patterns sound different. Changing musical metre is deliberate artistic modication and there is no single correct way to do it. It's like a distorting Photoshop filter - after you've ...


2

What is monstrous about it? Compared with the couple of bars just before the start of this "piu mosso" section, it's easy. If you can't play two straightforward trills and an E major scale in octaves, you shouldn't even be thinking about playing this concerto. That fact that it's marked "rit" part way through makes it even easier! This is the earlier ...


0

A time signature can convey a few things - it tells you how many beats are in each bar because of this, it tells you where the starts of the bars are, which tells you where the downbeats are (which are usually played strongly) it gives you a clue as to what the pattern of accenting of the beats should be within each bar. Normally, a composer chooses to ...


4

Your question contains a crucial misunderstanding in the two words piano keyboard The defining feature of a piano keyboard is weighted keys, emulating the hammer mechanism of a real piano. Most teachers recommend learning with weighted keys, because otherwise kids get used to keys which take little-to-no force to press, and this makes it significantly ...


6

Its only my opinion, but my observations in the music store are such that they lead me to think the lights on these keyboards serve one purpose, to sell keyboards. I've never known any teachers that use them to teach with, and I've never met anyone that actually learned to play music that way, so in my opinion the lights are a sales gimmick but an effective ...


0

Heather is correct. We would need to see you play and/or see the music. The three causes of tension and cramps are using the wrong muscles, using two muscles at the same time or pressing too hard into the keybed. It is actually the weight of the arm that depresses the keys with subtle flexion of the fingers. There are a lot of other muscles which are also ...


2

Without seeing the sheet music or watch you play, it is hard to know exactly what is contributing to the problem. In general, though, cramping is an indication that the muscles are too tight. You need to figure out why. Are you keeping your hand stretched out too much or are you using bad fingering? Are your shoulders tense, which causes a cascade of ...


13

Don't bother with lights. The player will be forever chasing them. In fact, for a few weeks I recommend not trying to read dots either. Just get used to the instrument, what it can do, and have fun. I would hope that pound for pound, a keyboard without lights would have other, better features.Most will have speakers or a headphone port. Buying pre-loved ...


22

Without. Point blank. Lights look fun to start with, but a beginner will end up watching them rather than learning to read. Note, you can usually switch them off, so you don't have to choose a keyboard that doesn't have them. I have no recommendations on mobile teaching apps, I've never used them.


1

You somehow missed the Paganini Étude No. 4 by Liszt, which is a one-staff transcription of the Paganini Caprice No. 1. Enough additional notes are placed so some sections have to be played with both hands.


5

It is sixteenth notes played the same way as the first part of bar 118 in the left hand where it is written out. It will be a total of eight sixteenth notes because the symbol is written betweeen half notes, so the half notes indicates the total duration of the figure. Note that the symbol is two beams which is how you can see that it is sixteenth notes. In ...


1

Tremolo. The notes before the lines are alternated as quickly as possible, for the two beats shown. EDIT: it seems that the three notes will alternate with the second minim, although that isn't easy given the stretch between highest and lowest notes.


1

Learning to play music is about developing techniques and learning to sight read and count the rhythm, not really so much about the arrangement. The focus should probably be on the process of learning and not so much how advanced a beginner the child might be. Simple songs are a tool that is used to facilitate learning through repetition and the performance ...


7

Unfortunately, notes and chords (triads especially) are often called by the same names. When someone says 'play a D', it could mean play a D note, or play a D major chord.That's confusing, and it's where you came unstuck. You already know the note names for the D major scale, that's fine. The first answer explained the triads. From a major scale there's ...


10

In tonal harmony, all major (Ionian) scales follow the same pattern of whole steps and half steps: W-W-H-W-W-W-H. When you want to play all of the major triads for a particular key, you stack each chord up in thirds and use the notes from that specific scale. For example, if you are playing the D Major scale, the D triad would have the notes D-F#-A; D to F#...


2

In general, someone with the skill to handle a hard piece of music will be able to learn it regardless of whether or not they've previously learned an easier arrangement. In most cases where someone who has learned an easier version finds a hard version frustrating, the problem is simply that they lack the skill to handle the hard version, and starting with ...


1

If you're talking about left hand notes in between playing the chords, there are a couple of things you can try: 1) Arpeggiate the chords as you play them--play the notes of the chords in various order in a faster rhythm than the melody rather than playing them all at once. 2) As long as you stay in the same key, going up or down the scale stepwise from ...


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