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From your previous question (Sudden death of Fishman preamp on acoustic guitar), I'd guess that you don't KNOW if it's faulty, you're just assuming so. I still maintain that it's the church sound engineer who has the problem. You will be looking for an under-saddle pickup - the hole will already have been drilled, for the previous pickup. Make sure you get ...


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Yesterday I could finally take it not to a music shop, because living in Cuba, the closest thing to a music shop available is the bazar where they sell conga drums, lol, but to a friend of mine whohas a little repair shop for electronics in general. We spent the whole day taking apart the preamp and measuring conectivity and looking for probable faulty ...


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Piezo processors come in two primary flavors. The L.R. Baggs Para Acoustic DI is a good example of the first one, straight up tone shaping. The unit is basically a combination of a preamplifier stage like you'd find on a combo amp, running through a DI transformer to produce the balanced lo-Z output. The Fishman Aura Spectrum is an example of the second and ...


4

Your sound engy is hacking the guitar's connection to the mixer. To what end, I can't say, but I can say that the change in cable is significant and is the primary reason for your woes. Acoustic-electric guitars have a battery-powered preamp. To avoid that battery being constantly connected to the preamp, draining the battey when you're not using the guitar,...


1

Personally, seeing the wires wouldn't particularly concern me - other pics I can find online of similar models (1,2) seem to also show a cheeky bit of wire peeping out. I was thinking about using a pointy blunt object to push the wires in I wouldn't do that. If it's something that you find particularly offputting in terms of presentation, you might want ...


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This is absolutely not a problem, unless you object to the cosmetic appearance. Some pickups have that extra loop there to add extra relief to lower the risk of snapping the wires when removing/replacing pickups. If you pop the back off or remove strings and pop the pickup out, you may be able to reroute the wires if you want to. Or you could get some ...


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Leave it alone - you'll probably break something. They're meant to be like that. Basically, that's where the coil wires are tagged onto the thicker wires needed to carry the signal off to the volume & tone pots. The short loops you can see are where the thicker wires are dropped through the pickup base to provide a stronger structure, strain relief when ...


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On a cheaper Fender guitar, it's incredibly unlikely that you have a TRS connection from the Fishman pickup. You're just going to have a standard 1/4" mono cable (TS - but rarely called that). Buy a 10ft 1/4" Mono instrument cable. Connect it to the DI box you have, and let the sound engineer earn his money by using a standard XLR cable to connect your DI ...


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note: I've had to change my answer, thanks to a comment pointing out what's happening. TRS-XLR cables often don't work for connecting a guitar to a balanced circuit. The TS connector in the guitar does not have a ring contact, which means pin 3 on the XLR floats. The preamp on the mixer input works by measuring the difference between pin 2 and 3. If pin 3 ...


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I've had dozens of guitars in my lifetime and the pickups I like best are those found in American guitars, either Fender or Gibson. I've put Fender American and Gibson pickups in cheap guitars and the difference in sound is amazing making the cheap guitars to sound great! You can get used Gibson pickups in the $50 range, and American Fender pickups even ...


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