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28

You could remain directly facing the audience, with the smile gradually dripping from your face to be replaced by something between boredom & abject terror... ...or you may find it a lot easier to just quarter-turn & watch the conductor. You're still up there, looking professional, paying attention, but aren't being subjected to the actinic glare ...


19

Wrist pain may be "normal" in the sense that many players encounter it at some point. But it is not "normal' in the sense that you should ignore it. I have seen injuries take down some very talented and able people. If you experience pain and discomfort, especially at times when you are not playing, then you should consult with a doctor, not other guitar ...


19

Some performers prefer the "look busy" approach. I once attended an oboe concerto performance in which the oboist swabbed out his instrument every time he had more than 4 measures' rest. I suppose a violinist could rub down excess rosin, pretend to tweak the bow tension, re-set the comfy rag under the shoulder rest, etc. In any case, looking attentive, and ...


16

My go-to approach for this is just to let your eyes guide the audience to where you believe their attention should be. If you look at the orchestra after you have been the center of attention for a bit, they'll do the same thing. Lead the audience to where you want them to be...both with your music, and with your body (and eye!) language. Edit: Once it's ...


11

@Grey's answer is good. I have had similar problems in the past, which caused me to get some repetitive stress injury in my wrist and get ganglions on the back of my left hand as well as carpal tunnel syndrome. I'm no doctor but the solution, for me, was to change my technique so that my left wrist was straight at all times when I played. This meant: I ...


9

I was taught what @tim said as well as a few other tricks (My teacher also taught children so some of it was presented that way). Legs: When sitting at the piano you want your hips above your knees. This is good for your knees and your hips. Sit (Sitz) Bones: When sitting upright you should be able to feel two bones in your bum pressing against the seat. ...


8

I'm a violinist, not a pianist, but it's very common for beginning violin players to have severe pain because they are too tense, especially when they are self taught. I'm going to suggest a few generic techniques to start minimizing tension. When you sit down at the piano, think about how you are sitting. Look for any tension, especially in your neck and ...


6

I don't believe there is a good posture. More important is the height of your hands above the keys. This needs to be so that your wrists are comfortable about 3 inches above the keys, so you're not raising the wrists whenever you move your thumbs under your hands, as in playing scales, etc. For this to happen, the forearms ought to be about horizontal, so ...


6

The best practice is to move minimally, and stop thinking about where your hands are now and instead focus on where your hands need to be in the immediate future (usually 1-2 measures down the road, depends on your piece). For example, if you are playing a piece in E major and are resting on the root chord (E, G#, B), you do necessarily need to place your ...


6

It's true that if you are holding the violin correctly, you should be able to support it comfortably between your collar bone and your chin without putting your hand on it. However you must not "squeeze" the instrument in any way, either by pushing down with your head, or hunching up your shoulder. Your shoulder and neck must be relaxed or tension will ...


5

You should always try when you can to minimally move your fingers and hands when deciding where to place your fingers. In most cases this is keeping your fingering consistent with the positions and scales you are utilizing. A simple example is if you were playing in C position on piano and none of the notes were outside that position, you would keep your ...


5

You’ve only got so much focus to put towards playing an instrument, and when you try something new, it takes most of that focus. Right now, sitting up straight while playing involves a little extra focus, but trying something new involves a LOT of focus. It is likely that the more you do it, the easier sitting up straight will become. It will involve less ...


5

Normally, you'll get all the support you need when you simply rest your wrist/forearm on the upper body of the guitar. With your full hand completely free to move, you'll find that it is much, much easier to play smoothly. This is how I was taught to play both classical and rock style guitar.


5

if you want to play in the same position that you practise in, then have the guitar at the same height for both. It does make a lot of sense, because the angles are all the same. Make sure that the strap is at a position so that both whem standing or sitting, the guitar is in the same vertical place. If you do this, then when you're seated, it won't be on ...


4

If you experience soreness and pain in your wrists while playing the piano, it is ALWAYS "doing something wrong" pain. My best guess is that you are unnecessarily tensing up your wrists and holding your hands very rigidly to fit the "chord" shapes. Hold your hand above your lap and drop it like you can't control it and gravity is the only force acting upon ...


4

Czerny, who was Beethoven's student and wrote many books for increasing one's piano technique (his exercises are still regarded by many as the gold standard), give a precise description of good posture for pianists on pages 8 and 9 of LETTERS TO A YOUNG LADY ON THE ART OF PLAYING THE PIANOFORTE. The book is available online free and also through Amazon, ...


4

Your position looks fine to me, and all the advice about head of guitar being at the same height as your head is after all only approximate, as everyone's physique differs to some extent. The most important thing is that the position feels totally comfortable to you. You are likely to spend many hours playing the guitar, especially if you are keen enough ...


4

For me the sign of whether your foot stool is in a wrong position is whether your right foot lifts to meet the guitar. SOmetime I don't have a foot rest handy and then I just use my guitar case as a makeshift stool and I can really feel it in the ankles after a while from how I have to arch my one foot upwards to meet the guitar. What I'm really wondering ...


4

My first reaction is your stool is awfully high. When concert guitarists play onstage they usually use a piano stool. When I sit on too high of a seat I end up having to use my hands to hold the guitar in my lap. It should be stable in your lap without having to hold it. Compare with the posture of a few others: Andres Segovia. Much lower stool. The whole ...


4

I was a piano teacher for over 50 years before I retired recently, and it is my experience that no two hands are alike and no two pianists ever use exactly the same hand technique.. Success comes from finding what works for YOUR hand, and to listen to supposed 'expert' teachers lecture about 'correct' hand posture is to invite carpal tunnel syndrome. One of ...


4

Pull your strap up higher so your arms are not extended so much. This looks geeky and may feel awkward at first, but it works. As you get more comfortable playing in a standing position, you can loosen the strap a little bit to add some cool factor. But there is no need to play the guitar down around your thighs. I laugh every time I see that because you ...


4

I believe that in this case it is an affectation for the purposes of the video, c.f this live performance, where standard modern technique is used. Basically, I think that some combination of the artist and the director thought that it would look more archaic. There are indications that earlier Baroque technique would involve holding the instrument lower. ...


4

The best solution would be to buy a tuba stand. It sits on the ground between your legs and has a curved portion that rests right in front of your chair where you place the tuba: Is there a reason you feel that you're "supposed" to sit at the front of the seat? I'm a tuba player myself, and I sit at the back of the chair with the tuba sitting on the chair. ...


4

I used have sore shoulders after playing for an evening at an Italian restaurant in college. I finally figured out that it was because I was lifting my shoulder up to high while playing. In the moment, it seems expressive and natural, but turns out that it's much more natural to let your shoulders relax all the way, sit up straight, and make sure the ...


3

Difficult to pinpoint without actually seeing what is going on. However, it may be the angle of the guitar, both vertically and horizontally, making the fretting wrist strain more than needed. It may be the action is too high, strings too heavy, that means you're having to press harder than necessary to get clean notes. It may be that you simply are pressing ...


3

I would like to add that the guitar neck wood species and construction can make a difference also. I have developed some wrist pain and now wear a compression wrap and I notice a mahogany set neck guitar will aggravate it much more quickly than a maple bolt on neck. For me, complex chordings or fingerings are not the main culprit, but rather the increased ...


3

When I first started learning to play piano, my teacher always told me to pretend there was a tangerine under each of my hands and if they became too close to the keyboard, I'd squish them (I was quite young at the time). However, I found this helped me a lot and made playing piano so much easier. Also, sitting up straight is vital because you can actually ...


3

About 99% of where your hand should go is determined by two things: 1. the style of music and sound you want 2. what feels comfortable to you When I finger-pick an acoustic guitar, I find myself holding my pinky below the e-string on the pick guard (if applicable). If I'm wanting a pulsing (I don't know the word, think punk-rock rhythm) strummed rhythm, ...


3

If your pick is catching your pups, you have too much showing.For faster play there needs to be only a little sticking out, so it shouldn't catch. You will use all sorts of hand/arm positions to play. Some will need a 'floating' arm, where the contact is inside elbow on guitar body. Sometimes the palm will rest just behind the saddles, as in palm-muting, ...


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