33

You could be not reaching those high notes for any of these reasons: You are young and your voice is still developing your vocal technique is bad you're doing the wrong exercises and over-straining your voice you have a naturally low voice, and you'll never hit those notes Only a qualified voice teacher will be able to tell you which of these is the case, ...


14

Only a guess, as there's not a lot to go on. It could be that you're trying to play with your fingers, as opposed to your hand. Yes, that sounds daft, but beginners sometimes think that a chord is like an extension of single notes together. Which it obviously is, but it won't be played as such. Away from the piano, move your fingers from the knuckle joint. ...


10

To be realistic, different people have different ranges. If everyone had the range of Mariah Carey or Axel Rose they would use it. However Taylor Swift only has just over 2 octaves and she has managed quite well. As others have said; don't strain but remember that falsetto or even whistle registers might be available to you. This is a way of getting extra ...


7

My most significant breakthrough moments were unpredictable and highly personal, in the sense of being very specific to a particular time in my overall learning process. Here they are, in roughly chronological order (as best I remember). The last item is the one most important for me, and which I unreservedly recommend. You could read that and skip the rest. ...


7

Keep straining only if you want no decent voice - ever! At your age and stage of development, it's gently gently. My baby's learned to walk - time to teach him how to jump over hurdles. Absolutely not. It may just be that you have a low voice with a low range. Nothing wrong with that. Except we all yearn for something we don't have. It's called being human. ...


6

Any basic folding stand has little clips that fold up to stop your pages flipping, or a sheet falling off. tbh, it was only a search on Amazon that threw up solid face ones without clips that made me even think such without clips were even available. Obviously made by manufacturers who have never played an instrument in their lives.:\ Just search "...


5

As a classically trained, Major Label (all of them) Music Producer, I would like to reinforce much of the good advice hear. Specifically the advice about not straining. If you have any discomfort while singing, you should stop immediately (mid note if needed) and assess what you are doing and your motivation for singing in that way. Again being a good and ...


4

I have been seeing that most of the singers that are females can usually hit these amazing high notes with no problem whatsoever. they worked hard to make it seem easy, voice of every person is different. Find a good teacher and take singing lessons. There is no better way to address your specific issues.


4

First it is admirable that you are dedicated to improving both your composing and musicianship skills, especially while working a full time job. There is no formula to how to divide up your practice. This question is fairly subjective and you will probably get different opinions on it BUT there is no doubt that it is beneficial to be somewhat proficient on ...


4

One possible exercise is to practice playing the triads corresponding to a scale as you would a scale. So for A major, instead of playing A – B – C# – D – E – F# – G# – A, you can play the chords: A - Bm - C#m - D - E - F#m - G#dim For minor scales you might want to invent a few variations of the exercise to cater for the flexibility in minor keys.


3

I'm afraid your teacher is right. This is a problem common to all keyboard instruments and others as well (harp, guitar). It simply requires lots of practice and careful listening.


3

One wouldn't particularly use a metronome a lot when learning a piece. It doesn't help learning the notes or dynamics, all it does is keep a very strict time (which often isn't appropriate!) for you to keep to that tempo on parts that you may wander with. Listening to something a lot - or even hearing it subliminally - is a good way to 'get into' a piece. ...


3

Apart from all the good advice already given: keep in mind that music is art, not a sport! There are great singers with all sorts of different ranges. Actually, I love the contra-alto voice of legendary singer Kathleen Ferrier (check out her version of "Blow the wind southerly", for instance). I don't know what her range was, but as a contra-alto ...


2

I trained for classical singing at Juillard and can tell that your singing range is not simply set. I started at a bass-baritone, but instructor worked with me (a lot) to increase my range so I could preform pieces previously "too high" for me to sing. Training and practice can increase your range, both up and down. That said, not all women can be ...


2

We all have naturally a "head voice" and a "breast voice". Little children naturally "know" to use their head resonance. When starting school many children (girls and boys) are losing or forgetting their head resonance and lose singing in higher ranges - consciously or unconsciously the mean it is uncool speaking or singing in ...


2

As long as your playing is completely clean I'd keep on going until you reach your limit. Exercises like Hanon will help your overall dexterity especially in classical pieces. But the main thing is to make sure that you are playing extremely and completely clean. No overlapping notes, no wrong notes at all. Otherwise this will not help at all.


2

To determine if you have reasons to practice your Hanon exercises faster than the recommended tempo markings, it is helpful to consider your individual goals, and which aspects of your skills that you're trying to improve during a given practice session. Depending on your skill level, you might find that you could even double the recommended tempo, although ...


2

I knew most of what I know about guitar before John got big, so I've never really dug into him, but everything I've seen tells me I should take a look. Chord vibrato is tough, and off the top of my head, I can't think of another song that features it. Beyond "search for videos of people trying to teach it" and "search for live versions of John ...


2

Having good piano skills is probably going to be the most important to you as a composer. The piano - whilst not a full orchestra - is the next best thing. Melody and harmony are both possible, not so on many other instruments. So, while it's impossible for any of us to say this is the proportion to use on x, your expertise on piano will greatly enhance yur ...


1

This isn't much, but I have always remembered it. The details are so interesting. It's a letter from Mozart to his father and he mentions the good musical memory of one of his students. Paris, May 14, 1778. I HAVE already so much to do that I don't know how I am to manage when winter comes. I think I wrote to you in my last letter that the Duc de Guines, ...


1

John looks like he's turning a key with his left hand/arm to apply that vibrato. It's not wrist motion, it's from the elbow. Using very light gauge strings will help. Probably having ridiculously large hands does too, but I wouldn't know.


1

Your example piece is not absolute beginner material. It's hard for me to believe you really can't play basic chords like those and strike all the notes simultaneously. If you were asked to play a C major chord in isolation (not as chord within a performance piece) are you really unable to strike all the notes simultanteously? Unless your teacher is being ...


1

The risk of listening to a recording multiple times, especially if it's only a single recording, is that the particular interpretation gets stuck in your head. Then when playing you will try to recreate that particular interpretation, rather than trying to understand the composition on your own. Trying to recreate an interpretation of a good musician is a ...


1

Listening to a piece of music multiple times and using a metronome for a piece of music you are learning serve very different purposes. I don't really see how you can play something really well unless you have the music in your mind and to achieve that most people will find it necessary to listen to the music many times particularly if their music reading ...


1

I know that I'm late to this party, but I was a piano teacher for a long time, and I came to a rather different philosophy than I've seen in the answers so far, and I think that it served my students quite well. In my experience, the vast majority of practice time by 6- and 7-year olds is very inefficient. If they practice for 60 minutes, they will get ...


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