17

I won't (nor could) speak as a trumpet player, but I'd like to give my own general answer as a musician. As many of us, I've been stuck in the last year and a half due to the current pandemic. Not only phisically (as a classical percussionist, I do not own many of the instruments I'd usually play) but even mentally: I struggled with the whole "ok, I ...


16

@BrianTowers beat me to the quote I was going to use, but the trumpet players I've worked with all have expressed the need to play daily. I found that after a particularly intense gig, a day off way helpful — even necessary. The thing for me that suffers first when I take a break is endurance. That can drop in a matter of days of no playing. However things ...


15

Well, the problem is that as you practice, your subconscious mechanism picks up repeated tasks. If you are still "fully present" (I'd call it "trying hard") once your subconscious develops capability, you end up with two brain systems struggling for control of the muscles of the body. You can see this clearly when you start learning a ...


15

The quote I'm familiar with is If I miss a day's practice, God notices Miss two days practice and I notice Miss three days practice and the world notices Doing a search, the closest I find to this is this quote from the great violinist, Jascha Heifetz: If I don't practice one day, I know it; two days, the critics know it; three days, the public knows it. ...


9

Premise: I'm italian, and I am really fanatic about our language pronunciation and writing, including their meaning, context and history, especially when related to music. Now, the keyword here is elision, even if this often happens as a similar aspect, apocope. The elision is when an unstressed vowel (or syllable) is omitted at the end of a word when the ...


8

This is going to sound funny, but every time I practice, I do so by performing as though I am front of the live audience. I strap my guitar on, plug it in thru my pedal board and amps, and I stand up to the mic stand that is plugged into the music room PA system. Whether practicing by myself solo, or in a full band practice session, I perform each song as ...


7

I can't speak for every player of course. But I'd say there was a recovery time from even a couple of days off. You DO recover, of course.


5

As in the majority of things, it varies. On (odd) occasions, I've commented to students that their playing has improved since last lesson, only to hear ' Well, I honestly haven't had an opportunity to pick it up since then.' Sometimes, we need that break to let it all sink in. But how long need that break be, before it's detrimental? Quite a few of the ...


5

As a teacher, I don't expect blind, unquestioning obedience from students. However, when two different teachers recommend something, maybe you don't need a third opinion whether "it's OK"! No, I wouldn't recommend making a habit of watching TV while you practice as your default way of practicing. And yes, there can be danger in excessive mindless ...


4

The 'e' at the end of 'languisce' and the 'i' of 'il' should both be pronounced, with a legato connection. Cecilia Bartoli and Luciano Pavarotti both sing it that way, both are Italian, and both are the pinnacle of singers. NOTE: where one needs to be careful is in switching between the 'e' and 'i' vowel sounds that the purity of each is preserved. You don't ...


3

My personal opinion is to play about 2-3 at the same time. If I play only one piece at a time I get either very bored or demotivated or distracted. I spend about 10-15min on one piece. Then move onto the next. Then the next and just rotate around until I feel I've done enough for the day.


2

Every day for as long as your chops hold out, which will probably be only 20-40 minutes (maximum) the first days. As your chops come back, practice longer until you no longer have the time each day to practice for longer periods. No matter what, practice every single day for as long as you can, even if it’s only five minutes. That’s the only way to get it ...


1

I think it depends on many parameters. In an absolute world, after a couple of days, you feel it. Playing music is first and foremost a matter of muscle memory, then a combination of strength, speed, accuracy, and flexibility. But you feel it in a way that only extends your warming up session, not necessarily harms your playing. If you stop for a longer time ...


1

I think your goal should not be to practice toward a certain speed. The goal should be about controlling the touch of each finger. You want the scales to have a nice even sound. A slight emphasis on the first note of each beat, or strong beats is a good way to get an even sound. You can practice scale in various ways to train your touch: straight eighths or ...


1

You should be thinking of the concept of "C", but the sound of Bb or A, if that makes sense. The instrument doesn't care what you call the note, the only thing that matters for sound production is the actual pitch which it is speaking at. You don't need to name it at all- you can think about "the sound of (imagine what it sounds like)." ...


1

I mostly agree with Albrecht's answer -- practicing is mostly for performance. If you're playing pieces for your own study and edification, practice individual pieces as much as you're interested in them. If you find a piece you particularly want to learn, spend more time on it. If you find yourself bored, move on (and possibly come back). The worst ...


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