7

You should play whatever speed you can with completely (completely, though!) relaxed hands. Except for the base of the finger being played, there should be no more muscular tension than if the hand was just sitting on a desk. When you start to speed up, there's a tendency to "try-hard," which interferes with the passing of the thumb and makes ...


4

The ABRSM 2021–2022 Piano Syllabus applies the following scale speeds for each exam grade, with all scales played in eighth-notes.1 Image source (PDF page 16) Initial: quarter-note = 54 Grade 1: quarter-note = 60 Grade 2: quarter-note = 66 Grade 3: quarter-note = 80 Grade 4: quarter-note = 100 Grade 5: half-note = 60 Grade 6: half-note = 72 Grade 7: half-...


2

So a technique to practice this I found useful is to consciously stop just before you play in the new position and look at your hand and adjust before you play it. This forces you to be very conscious about the new position. In the end you can reduce the gap down to nothing. I found this helped me get the muscle memory quicker.


1

There is no "official" list of rhythmic rudiments for non-percussion instruments,1 but such a list can be inferred by the way rhythm is introduced in various training methods and certificate exams. I give a loosely graded list of rudiments first, with the sources following.2 1 I propose that one reason for this is that in percussion training there ...


1

Yes, you realize that the field of music is fairly vast. You can practice for a lifetime and still be "nowhere". But, whether you are "nowhere" or "somewhere" really depends on you. As in most things, it is useful to set a few things first. Define your goals, estimate how realistic they are, see if you have the resources (mostly ...


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