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My advice is to make a lead sheet where you write the chord progression and another sheet where you notate the melodic patterns and the fingerings - almost every bar has a repeated motif - thus it won’t be difficult to get a reduction to the essential changes. If you really play from this system shown in the video it’s no wonder that you struggle. You have ...


5

There‘s no contra at all to simplifying a classical music piece for a beginner. it can be an approach to music and open for someone that never came into contact with classical music if he couldn't learn to play a simplified arrangement for piano e.g. Für Elise. Also easy transcriptions for brass bands can be a door opener for classical music for people who ...


3

See a doctor. Unless someone here is asking 20 questions because they can diagnose you don't listen. Your problem could be poor technique or it could be a real medical problem. As an example (ONLY AN EXAMPLE) I'll use myself. I was diagnosed with Psoriatic Arthritis a few years back. This type of arthritis shows up in the finger and toe joints, smallest ...


3

To learn the violin, you’ll need to get a teacher. Learning alone is very hard and learning itself is going to take a long time. You need to practice a lot and train your muscle memory for fingering positions. Try not to get an expensive instrument (like a used one or you can rent one) because you don’t know if you will continue. Best of luck


3

As commenters have pointed out, the typical fingering would be 12345 on the first chord and 11345 or 12345 on the second. 11345 is possible on the first chord too, with some practice. Try these out and see what you think. However: Rachmaninoff had famously large hands, and his writing reflects that. If playing the first chord with all five fingers is ...


2

Almost; the '2' and '4' don't have a corresponding note but are the second half of the quarter notes. The arrows below indicate how the rhythm is to be counted:


2

When I started with tin whistles I already played recorder and clarinet. I found the best place to go for help was any nearby folk club as you usually find whistle players there. Depending on the key of the whistle, Bb, C, D, Eb, F and G decides the key you play usind the same fingering for the tonic scale. I've played for 40yrs now just thinking along those ...


2

If you are still messing up scales, then they're not in your sub (or even un) conscious yet. When was the last time you were running, and thought ' does my heel or toe need to hit the ground first?' Chances are, if you did think that, you'd probably fall over... Running has reached the stage where it's at least subconscious, so it's not necessary to analyse ...


2

This is a soloist cadenza, like Richard assumes in his comment. The first motif of this is equal to a quarter note: one 8th and two 16th - and easy to count. The 2nd passage the E-major scale down has in the beginning a 16th note and two 32nds, which don’t match in a metrical schema - if you don’t notate it as duplets of six 32nds. So don’t try to find any ...


2

Hands playing automatically is called "muscle memory", in fact this is a misnomer because muscles don't have a memory - not this sort of memory anyway. The part of the brain called the cerebellum memorises motor actions. This takes away a load from the conscious parts of our brain. https://www.thoughtco.com/anatomy-of-the-brain-cerebellum-373216 ...


1

Unconscious means that you are able to play the motifs, figurations, passages like you handle chords, triads, arpeggios and scales and ornaments (mordents, turn-arounds and trills) in classical music and riffs and licks in pop and jazz. This means you have to analyze the form, the harmony, the chords, the chordprogression, and you must have the entire ...


1

What you have there are groups of six in the RH against groups of four in the LH. In principle, that's the same as groups of three against groups of two, in other words triplets vs duplets - you just have two sets per note grouping. If you are used to playing triplets in one hand whilst playing duplets in the other, you'll do fine playing them using the same ...


1

Learning to play music doesn't work like that. Even assuming you have the fundamental skill level to play the chords, sequences, etc. at the required tempo, our bodies & in particular our nervous system don't "learn" based solely on total practice time. Some of the learning requires multiple days (or weeks) for the abilities to pass from ...


1

So you have stage fright in front of the camera? I'd have to hear the kind of mistakes you are making to know what is going on but it is probably one of three things: You don't know the piece as well as you think. It is not enough to be able to read the notes and match them to keys. You must know where they are going, the progressions, intervals, keys, ...


1

It depends on whether your goal is improv or classical recital performance. Your description of "automatic playing" is featured as a goal in Pepe Romero's book on Classical Guitar technique. From his father he learned that a piece of music should be memorized, not only the notes but the feeling of playing every note, chord, etc. To the point ...


1

'Eye to fingers' playing - barely hitting the brain - is a very useful accomplishment. As is the development of muscle memory for tricky patterns and passages. But if it's letting you down on a particular piece, yes you'll need to backtrack and sort it out.


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The first thing to consider is the fact that you have several options to choose from and you'll need to choose the one that suits your interest best. Probably the first option to consider is an instructor or mentor that you can freely ask questions and will freely pass along practice tips and guidance. Another option is to find instruction sites that ...


1

A few suggestions: It was mentioned in comments already, but another easy way to get lots of practice material would be to use a website that allows you to print sheet music transposed into any key. In cases of many of these arrangements (like popular music), there's often not a great deal of emphasis put on the physical element of how the piece "feels" in ...


1

Joking aside here is an idea. Get a free software like MuseScore, or TuxGuitar (if you are a guitarist looking for TAB). Take some sheet music at the level you want to practice and input that in MuseScore (or other s/w) in whatever key you have it in. Change the key of the song in the s/w to the key you want it in. Print. Practice. I am not pushing ...


1

What I can advise to you (I have the same problem every time when I learn a new piece) is to make sure you listen to how you're playing, try and relax your wrists and don't hit the keys. I had this problem when I was younger and my teacher always used to tell me to relax my wrists. If you're playing from you're wrists, then you have no control over the notes....


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