New answers tagged

5

In addition to Aaron's useful suggestions: Practise the 'K' sound on its own. You could alternately play a scale or simple melodic motif using 'T' articulation then 'K'. The goal here is to make the 'K' sound as incisive as the 'T'. Bear in mind that what you hear by conduction through your skull to your ears is not the same as the room sound that everyone ...


6

A few practice tips: Keep the vowel consistent: rather than "tu ka", try "tu ku" or "ta ka". Try different vowels: "tee kee" or even "toh koh" might work better for you. Try different consonants: "D" and "G" are often taught instead of "T" and "K". I use both depending ...


1

Since you clarify in the comments that one of the challenges you're focusing on is how to count rests during which other parts have metric changes. I'd strongly recommend doing some work with the score (if you have access to it) and a good recording, so you can get familiar with what those other parts are doing and how you'll fit into it. Yes, it's an ...


0

Yes, brass band music, especially test pieces, loves meter changes! Blame Edward Gregson, 50 years ago. His piece 'Patterns' may have started the trend. You COULD practice to a fast 8th note click. Or you could program the actual piece into a computer sequencer, either as clicks in the required groupings - or why not program in the complete part, melody ...


9

A regular mute changes the colour of the sound. A silent brass mute (like the Yamaha one I've used for years) won't silence you but it substantially reduces the produced volume. The instrument does "feel" different when the mute is inserted - there's more back pressure and the intonation of some of the lower notes goes off a bit. But it still feels ...


Top 50 recent answers are included