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11

The basic problem with a bass guitar in a guitar amp is that speaker and cabinet are not built for the low frequencies of the bass guitar. That means that at the low notes, the speaker will convert 99% of the electrical energy put into it into heat rather than 95% (numbers pulled completely out of the hat, but speaker efficiencies are indeed rather low). ...


8

A pre-amp amplifies a quiet signal such as that from a passive guitar pickup, or a microphone, into a louder signal suitable for the input of a power amplifier. A couple of terms: "Instrument level" - the signal strength that typically comes out of a pickup instrument. This is generally so weak that if you connected it direct to some headphones, you wouldn'...


6

@user36187 is right – a preamp will not change anything about the suitability of a guitar amp for amplifying bass. In fact, it would rather exacerbate the problems! Such preamps are designed to add a bit of colour and possibly distortion to the bass sound. This can make sense if you're plugged straight into a PA or an active monitor speaker, which can ...


6

Every pedal in your pedalboard already incorporates a preamp, or can be regarded as one. An overdrive pedal is a preamp. A distortion pedal is a preamp. A chorus pedal is a preamp. En equalizer pedal is a preamp. All of these boxes are designed such that any of them can be the first element in your signal chain right after the instrument, dealing with the ...


6

A valve and a tube are the same thing -- "tube" was originally more common in American English, while "valve" was more common in England. A "vacuum tube" is any one of a number of types of electronic component based around an arrangement of electrodes inside a sealed glass unit, from which all the air has been removed. The kind of tube used in amplification ...


6

The confusion comes from the fact that “line level” is a sort of signal standard and “XLR” a type of connector or cable that uses such connectors. So there is no “XLR” type of signal. XLR cables can carry mic level or line level analog audio, digital audio (AES/EBU), and in rare cases, MIDI, lighting control signals, or other types of signal. So there is no ...


4

sound different Yes. Mic preamps with transformers tend to color the sound more than their transformer-less counterparts. Mic preamps utilizing transformers tend to have: lower sensitivity higher distortion less precise low end reproduction These are not necessarily bad things BTW! Different circuits sound different, just as different microphones sound ...


4

It all depends on what sound you are looking for. "Better sound" is a rather subjective concept. I do suggest you to get a system with phantom power, not for a "better sound" necessarily, but for increasing your arsenal of options. Your mic choice will vary in different scenarios, and it's very useful to have the option of going condenser. Vocals are ...


4

Important note: You can't connect both amps to that cab without blowing something up. You need two cabinets. There are some cabinets that support bi-amping, which is using two amps with one cabinet. Your cabinet does not. Your cabinet has two 1/4" inputs wired together in parallel so you can daisy-chain additional cabinets. Yes you can drive both power ...


4

Using a mic to amplify a guitar absolutely can make sense, but it also brings a hoard of problems that you don't really want to deal with in a live setup. I would strongly avoid plugging a microphone for an acoustic instrument into an onstage amp, that's a recipe for feedback disaster. Specifically in a big band setup, you will just need quite a bit of ...


3

I would use an electric guitar amp for the electric, because it won't sound right otherwise. Then I would get a pickup for the classical guitar and a two channel keyboard amp or keyboard amp and a small mixer or a small mixer and a powered speaker for both the keyboard and classical guitar.


3

You will have to do some research. You will need to find out the part number for the pre-amp in the assembly. It is possible the pick up system is in the service manual for the instrument, but likely not, as manufacturers will change what system they are using on a model and often don't include them in the manual. I would start by calling Yamaha and ...


3

Based on the scenario you described and the way you plan to use your system, I would recommend a Powered Speaker/Monitor/Portable PA. This Harbinger Vari V2212 600W 12-Inch Two-Way Class D Loudspeaker is available at Guitar Center in US for $199.99 US. It has 3 channels and will accept XLR or 1/4 inch line input and also RCA input. It has an XLR output ...


3

You (almost certainly) do not need a separate preamp (yet) -- you should try taking the phones/line-out from your Spider 4 and record that on your computer. Note that when you do this, you'll want switch the the input to "line" level. If you do this you should be able to capture the sounds you're getting out of the amp onto the recording, without need to ...


3

Your cabinet is designed to accept the very quiet signal from a guitar pickup. Instead you are sending it the line-level signal from your pedal. Your cabinet is designed to add colour to a clean signal. Instead you are sending it a signal that already has all the colour and tone you want. Assuming you definitely want to use your pedal, the ideal would be ...


3

Phantom power is here to stay. Condenser mics are better for recording. Dynamic mics tend to be more use in the rough and tumble of live stage situations. To future-proof yourself, it's better to get equipment which can provide phantom power. Better recording mics will generally need it. A pre-amp would do, but eventually you'll be better off with a system ...


3

Assuming the SM58 is low impedance - a lot are, then a transformer recommended by Todd will at least get the right signal going into an amp. with high impedance inputs. However, point 1. There is little point in spending over £100 on a very good quality mic, and putting it through an amp. that won't do it justice. And it won't. Guitar amps are eq'd for ...


3

With an acoustic/electric guitar, you are usually dealing with a mostly standard acoustic bridge, where there is a piezo pickup mounted underneath the saddle where the strings run across. In an electric guitar, the strings are physically connected to a metal bridge that IS grounded into the circuitry of the guitar. In an acoustic/electric guitar, that does ...


2

A microphone certainly needs a preamp, to provide phantom power and to amplify the signal. But the preamp in your mixer or in your audio interface is probably just fine. A recent test in Sound on Sound magazine established that a variety of mic preamps, from utility-priced to boutique, unless set up to deliberately add distortion all sounded exactly the ...


2

I'm almost positive that the problem is not the interface but the settings on the amp sims you use or the amps sims themselves. Experiment more. As for the clipping, I'm not sure but your interface might have a pad button which lowers the input signal. Look for it.


2

There's no real easy way to achieve this. The two are so close together that total separation is just not possible. Historically it comes down to two choices... Record each separately Live with it. You can get a slight improvement by using more directional microphones, or by trying to place an absorber between your face & body [uncomfortable & ...


2

Sounds like your assumption is correct, as putting the looper between guitar and (pre)amp will only let you record the dry guitar sounds. Routing it send/return will work, as it'll pick up the sound dialled in on the amp. That means you can overdub with a different effect, and that too will stay in the loop, so to speak. Recommendations for gear are well ...


2

The problem here is that connecting a bass to a guitar amp isn't just about the electrical impedance but also the acoustic properties of a speaker. For obvious reasons a bass generates much lower frequencies than a guitar and lower frequencies are associated with significantly more mechanical power so there is a potential risk that you will physically damage ...


2

You want an XLR mic cable and also one of these: http://www.shure.com/americas/products/accessories/microphones/microphone-problem-solvers/a85f-line-matching-transformer Plug the mic into the cable, the cable into this thing, and this thing into the amp like a guitar. I've done this many times in my youth, when I had no money. It will be more prone to ...


2

This looks like a type of mini jack plug. The idea is that you unscrew the cover and push it back along the cable, revealing the soldered connection. However, you have left the cover attached to the cable and unscrewed the plug off it, and off the cable. It can be repaired. But the cable looks flimsy, and I suspect it will be moulded into the pickup, ...


2

'connect my guitar to the PA system'. We don't know what type of PA system it is. It might be a real PA, or it could be a glorified home stereo. So we're going to have to make an assumption that it's a real (or at least semi-pro) PA, with XLR inputs for each channel. There are any number of multi-effect pedals out there, from a few dollars up to many-few ...


2

You are on the right track, but here are some additional things to look at: 1) Does the mic'd guitar through an amp setup make sense? A mic'd guitar through an amp probably won't give you the pure acoustic tone you want. The amp itself will change the sound a lot. You will probably get a cleaner sound by using a small powered speaker, instead of the amp. ...


1

A PA is certainly a good investment, because it can be used for any signal source. A decent PA will sound pretty similar to what you hear in your headphones, so if you enjoy that sound you should also enjoy the PA sound. However, I wouldn't be so sure if that is musically so clever. Digital amp simulations have something of a tendency to sound impressive ...


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