New answers tagged

0

I'd use Flex Pitch, if you are determined to transpose regions then I'd make sure you turn on flex and follow, it will keep everything the same except for pitch.


2

They say you can't tell a sound by its wave - but sometimes you can guess a bit, based on having seen a lot of them. This to me looks almost criminally distorted with a very large sub-bass fundamental & massive smearing high frequencies, almost unrelated to the fundamental pitch. Whereas this bit looks clean, almost a single sine with subtly changing ...


0

First of all, NEVER DECIDE WHAT IT SOUNDS LIKE USING THE WAVEFORM. Waveform can possibly be used to monitor compression, limiting, or clipping. But I'd say that's about it I like to take two different "thicknesses" Along Time - Above answer by Michael Curtis gives a picture of how spaces between attacks indicate sustain, reverb, delay ... Along ...


2

The waveform documentation page for Audacity give a concise overview of what information is in a waveform graph. That pages is specific to Audacity, but I think the concepts covered will apply to most any waveform view. Basically it's a graph of time an amplitude. https://manual.audacityteam.org/man/audacity_waveform.html You mention "fat" and &...


1

Even though Logic has flex pitch and flex time which can both be very useful I prefer actually transposing entire sections of audio files rather than use the transients that the program analyzes for something like what you want to do. First make a duplicate of the audio file for safety because whatever you do can usually be undone but it is destructive. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included