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Most of the reason a compressor makes a given signal sound better is indeed simply that it allows you to turn up the gain – much more than would be possible without compression, because then it would either run you into headroom limitations or drown out some other instruments in the mix because the peaks are too loud. But yes, compression also has a bunch ...


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The other answers seem to be addressing ways to alter (and ideally enhance) the original audio waveform. Here's an alternative. Way back in the vinyl days, the RIAA curve was developed as a way to reduce background noise related to the physics of turntables and contact with the vinyl. Quoting bits from Wikipedia, The purposes of the equalization ...


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There are actually two types of compression: Normal "in line" compression, where the signal goes into the compressor and out again. This has the effect of making the loud bits of the signal quieter - but extra gain is then usually applied to bring up the overall level. This is basically "squashing the peaks". Parallel compression. This is where the original ...


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1: Export the audio, you want the audio exclusively, and you want it in lossless format (wav, aiff, flac) (unless your DAW in the next step supports video). You might need a video editing tool for this one. 2: Import the audio to a DAW: protools, live, logic, nuendo, whatever. 3: Apply auto-tune. 4: If your DAW can't deal with video, you need to glue back ...


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They don't always improve the quality or fidelity of audio. With the right parameters (or in many contexts, wrong parameters) compressors can: Completely change the dynamics of a performance, aka a good chunk of the performer's vision (and often the composer's and producer's and everyone else's but you vision too). Induce tremolo-like artifacts. Induce ...


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When I was learning about compression, I found the answer in its name. "Compression," "Compressor," it is a unit that compresses sound waves. They are used to dynamically control levels within your mix. As far as compressing your drums, they likely need compression if they haven't already been processed (like a pre-made loop etc.). To understand a compressor,...


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