20

Humans are pattern-seeking primates. And within Western culture, we have all internalized, consciously or not, the patterns of the major scale and pentatonic scale, because they're commonly used in folk songs and children's tunes. Once Bobby sings that A♯ at 1:06, the audience recognizes the pitches not as the entire major scale, but as the specific ...


11

is the crest of a sound wave equaled to high amplitude/ high volume and if so, does that mean the trough is low amplitude/ low volume? Not exactly. A sound wave is something that is perceived when sound pressure is changing at a rapid frequency - oscillating up and down at 20 cycles per second or more. If we say that the crests are high pressure and the ...


9

The crowd catch on quickly. But he cues them pretty strongly by singing the notes while setting up the pentatonic scale, and at 1'06" he definitely teaches the crowd what he wants. There's a similar demonstration online where he has to insist strongly that he wants a ♭7 rather than a leading note - the crowd definitely prefer the latter :-) He's got ...


5

Neither are particularly precise terms. 'Tone deaf' describes people who have trouble with recognising pitch. 'Amusia' would also include problems with other elements of music like rhythm or timbre. Or that's what musicians would say 'tone deaf' means. The wider community might apply it to someone who just doesn't 'get' music in any way - appreciation or ...


5

If we look at a dissonance curve like this one, from William Sethares' site: We can see that the statement an interval's acoustic consonance is a function of how "simple" it is as a ratio only holds at all when are already looking at particular ratios that are already themselves reasonably far apart. For example, it's fair to say that the fifth (3:2) ...


4

A crest and a trough both cause the eardrum to move away from its normal, undisturbed, resting position. Hence, the crest and the trough both embody a loud sound. When there is no sound, the ear drum is still; it is resting in a central position. When sound waves strike the eardrum, it moves the eardrum inward (crest) and outward (trough). The ear converts ...


3

Typically sympathetic resonance generates more copies of the same harmonics or fundamental tones, not new tones in between as your post suggests. I can think of one or two phenomenon that would describe this but I'd surprised if you can hear these if the notes are not close together (e.g. maj or min 2nd). When two harmonic waves (i.e. notes) are played ...


2

There is way too much missing to provide a complete answer but I will try and add some guidance from experience. You state that you want random groups of notes to be "meaningful" but can you define a criterion for meaningful (or is that what you want from us). What makes music meaningful in many cultures is rhythm not melody (though both are important). ...


2

Given a single chord, all played on the same instrument, with no notes doubled, there's no set answer to the question. Probably your ear will pick out either the highest or lowest note. But, as always, context is all. Some music is led by the bass line - often played on a separate instrument. Some by the melody - again maybe with an individual sound. ...


2

If we first assumme that we are taking about two acoustic instruments being played in a real space, there are a few things we have to do to get this to happen, all of which are hard: We have to find two instruments that can produce very similar waveforms, and play them with very similar technique such that they produce those very similar waveforms. This is ...


2

In practice this is nearly impossible without using mechanical (computer or the like) means. Not only must the amplitudes match but the frequency must be very close and stay that close for the whole duration. The other problem that affects the previous would in matching the phase. Note that a violin section may play almost perfectly in tune but will still ...


2

This sounds like an instance of sympathetic resonance (also call sympathetic vibrations), but in my experience the extra frequency we hear tends to be above the two that you are playing, not in between them. In short, each given pitch has its own harmonic series; think of these as additional pitches that you can't really actively hear. (Beware: this is a ...


2

Let's say you have two notes sounding with a frequency ratio of 3001:2000. Say, at frequencies of 600.2Hz and 400Hz. The lower note's 3rd harmonic is 1200Hz. The higher note's 2nd harmonic is 1200.4Hz, just different enough to be perceived as gentle beats (one beat every 2.5 sec if I've done my maths right). But if the higher note's frequency were 610 Hz, ...


1

In my own experience I have witnessed a series of tones that did not sound melodic at all. The lead break in Dr. Hooks version of "On the cover of the Rolling Stone" comes to mind. And at the risk of offending drummers everywhere, I've heard drum solos that seem to throw the concept of rhythm into the trash bin. Also, I'm not aware of a chord name for a ...


1

Music is a language. The hearing and reading of music (including perceiving sequences of notes as "phrases"), I imagine, is no different, which is why (Broca) aphasia was the first thing to come to mind. That's my opinion which seems to be supported by modern research ("the same areas of the brain process the syntactic information for both music and language"...


1

Try writing out the actual ratio as a continued fraction. One often hears the actual sound as one of the early convergenets. (Examples later if desired.) Sometimes one hears the "nice" ratio close to the actual ratio.


1

The quiet point in a sound wave is actually at the median point between the "crest" and the "valley" in a balanced wave, where the valley is equal in loudness to the crest but 180 degrees out of phase. That's as simple as I can explain it.


1

As this is an old question, I don't know if OP is still looking for this information. But there is significant literature (both theoretical and empirical) on metric grouping and perception. Perhaps the first to create a detailed theoretical model based on Gestalt principles was Lerdahl and Jackendoff's A Generative Theory of Tonal Music (1983), which ...


1

You have two questions in one post. The Beethoven eventually become clear as the music continues. That follows a very basic but important pattern in classical music: phrase endings are the point where tonality typically becomes clear. About Maria, is this the tritone you mention, the B in the treble against the F in the bass? I'm don't think that is a ...


1

This psychological phenomen is not only in music but in all kind of perception and thinking that our perception is influenced by our experience. One of my teachers said once in the sixties: What a 70 years old calls his "experience" is the sum of his prejugees he was clinging to inspite of all the experience he could have made." So we know that not only ...


1

Sure, probably some people have heard the first five bars in Eb major. But at bar eight, the bassoons playing a c' establish C minor, and after you've heard this once, you probably automatically hear the piece in C minor from the beginning. And there are those other factors Laurence mentions also. My rough estimate is that the number of "Eb major" ...


1

"How wonderful a sound can be". That's what you're talking about? Am, Em, Bm. Where's the resolution on a tritone? What IS interesting in the WSS score are the final bars. The 'Maria' motiv, settling on a C chord, with F# in the bass. An ending, but hardly a resolution! As for the Beethoven, no there's nothing intrinsically Cm rather than Eb major ...


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