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I would assume that it definitely depends on the tempo. I think if the tempo is 120 bpm, the noticeable time-difference would be somewhat close to 2 times higher than the noticeable time-difference of a 60 bpm tempo. For example, if the noticeable time-difference for a 60 bpm tempo was 12 ms, then something like 6 ms would be noticeable for a 120 bpm. I don'...


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A series of pitches that doesn’t create a feeling of melody is called a tone row. A rhythm that doesn’t give a pulse is called pointillistic or punctual rhythm.


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Let's consider all three one by one. Sequence of tones: have you learned yet about twelve-tone music? Create a twelve-tone row by using each of the twelve chromatic notes within the octave exactly once, with the order arranged such that the sequence does not strike the ear as sounding "tonal." That is, choose the order such that the result doesn't sound ...


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In my own experience I have witnessed a series of tones that did not sound melodic at all. The lead break in Dr. Hooks version of "On the cover of the Rolling Stone" comes to mind. And at the risk of offending drummers everywhere, I've heard drum solos that seem to throw the concept of rhythm into the trash bin. Also, I'm not aware of a chord name for a ...


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Music is a language. The hearing and reading of music (including perceiving sequences of notes as "phrases"), I imagine, is no different, which is why (Broca) aphasia was the first thing to come to mind. That's my opinion which seems to be supported by modern research ("the same areas of the brain process the syntactic information for both music and language"...


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Typically sympathetic resonance generates more copies of the same harmonics or fundamental tones, not new tones in between as your post suggests. I can think of one or two phenomenon that would describe this but I'd surprised if you can hear these if the notes are not close together (e.g. maj or min 2nd). When two harmonic waves (i.e. notes) are played ...


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This sounds like an instance of sympathetic resonance (also call sympathetic vibrations), but in my experience the extra frequency we hear tends to be above the two that you are playing, not in between them. In short, each given pitch has its own harmonic series; think of these as additional pitches that you can't really actively hear. (Beware: this is a ...


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Given a single chord, all played on the same instrument, with no notes doubled, there's no set answer to the question. Probably your ear will pick out either the highest or lowest note. But, as always, context is all. Some music is led by the bass line - often played on a separate instrument. Some by the melody - again maybe with an individual sound. ...


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The simplest question is usually the least considered, a search on "voice leading" will show that classical composers thought of a progression of 4 note chords as a progression of 4 single note melodies so obviously the top notes spell out the top melody and obviously the top melody dominates!This is almost never mentioned so when it is mentioned theorists ...


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