18

A few avenues you could pursue: There are many competitions for composers, and these are a primary way to gain recognition. Prizes can include monetary award, performances of the piece, and/or commissions for future work. Competitions are sponsored by local, national, and international organizations. A basic internet search will give you an abundance of ...


9

If caught without asking permission up front, it gets you a law suit, or at minimum, a takedown. Commentary is not covered under music publication laws, but under far more stringent broadcast laws. You could try to claim "fair use" but it's far better to have written permission first. They may even give you usage for free, if you're lucky. Note: Laws ...


8

Maestro, many cities have societies for composers, such as the Melbourne Composers' League, which have links with performers who are interested in performing new music. If I were a composer I'd look for a group near where I live. In New Zealand there is an annual Composers Workshop, which has performers "on tap".


4

It's not too commonplace, but it happens. Mahler added doublebasses to portions of Beethoven's symphonies where only the celli were playing. (I believe you can see the scores, with Mahler's insertions written it, at the New York Philharmonic.) It's stretching the limits a bit, blurring the line between "personal interpretation" and "a new ...


3

Many editors do not mark their emendations; often one must compare a given text with an "urtext" or "original edition" (not necessarily the same) or even a facsimile of the composer's notebook. In "good" editorial work, the editor's changes may be marked (an accidental enclosed in brackets rather than parentheses) or a dotted ...


3

The answer depends on where you got the voice of the sports commentator: If you hire someone for the purpose of your recording, then you own the copyright, and your use of the sound recording does not infringe on your own rights. If you use a recording of a sports commentator that is in the public domain, then there is no copyright to infringe. Whether a ...


2

Fair use laws in the U.S. are middling-ly clear imo, but I find Fair-dealing laws in Canada less so. Europe and the UK have their own similar frameworks. Generally, it depends on how/why you are using the recording (parody, education, etc.), how much of it you are using etc. If you think people will hear your song and that you will earn money from it, then ...


2

Performing rights royalties are always skewed to favor big artists. I guess that's a necessary downside to paying out royalties at all, because the cost of tracking ALL performances would quickly exceed the revenue collected. But ASCAP does recognize that songs performed in bars aren't the same songs that are being played on the radio or other media they ...


1

As a starting point, try the BMI Repertoire Search page. A brief test indicates they list the current PRO affiliation even if not BMI. In the case of Bandcamp, there do not appear to be any restrictions from the Bandcamp camp. Here is their terms of use page. On the BMI website, I did not immediately find their legalese, but their FAQ page is worth a browse. ...


1

For me it seems pretty obvious that you should be looking at an ISMN. I'm not going into the SEO aspects of an ISMN; that would be a different question in a different Exchange site. An extract from the ISMN manual at https://www.ismn-international.org/files/Web_ISMN_Users_Manual_2016.pdf; Each constituent part of a publication which is separately ...


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