23

For starters, the recorder is a great instrument that is played by everyone from the absolute beginner up to conservatory-trained professionals. There are some differences in how it is used in European compared to American culture--for starters, almost all professional-level players hail from outside of the US, whereas in the United States it is seen ...


13

Child-proof instruments are a rarity. Recorders are pretty well bombproof. They can easily be twisted to accomodate left-handers.It's quite easy to play each note in tune and the tone , whilst not over-pleasing, is acceptable, unlike, say, the violin in the hands of a beginner. The fingering is similar to flute, sax etc.So paving the way forward for some....


12

The recorder is probably very poor - Adlers were made in what was East Germany and in my opinion were not well-designed or well made. In fact, you may have a German-fingered recorder which are all uniformly terrible. The fingering for low f-natural is usually T1234-67, i.e, forked, but for those German fingered recorders it's T12345. In order to make this ...


11

My answer is no, it isn't really possible to use a fingering technique to play an A440 recorder at A415. No professional would even try; they would instead, as Wheat noted, have a real A415 instrument or, if extremely confident and well rehearsed, transpose on-the-fly down a half-step. One can indeed bend most notes up or down quite a bit using half-holes, ...


10

You certainly need to make the complete instrument before you try to scale it, as another answer said. Unless the design is an accurate copy of the Yamaha recorder, the pitch of the head joint on its own could be anything. In particular, it will depend on the design of the joint between the head and the rest of the instrument. To scale an instrument "...


9

The short answer: no, there isn't. The long answer: The six-hole chart you give for your tin whistle is for a tin whistle in D. A soprano recorder is in C. No, you are not going to find a D wind with the exact same fingerings as a C wind. However, there is something called a german-fingered recorder. A soprano (C) german-fingered recorder happens to ...


9

No, there is no good reason to have the left hand above, if you are only playing tin whistle. In medieval and renaissance times, wind instruments were played both ways. The only possible advantage I can see of having the left hand above is if you want to also learn some modern wind instrument- say clarinet or saxophone- as well. Since modern woodwinds are ...


9

From my experience as a brass player, you should absolutely learn the alto using the correct pitches and correct fingerings. It takes some time to get used to, but the future benefits far outweigh the struggle it takes to gain fluency. And yes, there will be moments where you'll make a mistake and slip into the other set of fingerings, but they'll be few ...


8

The reasons (in addition to those of DrMayhem), which I think of are: easy to find a teacher affordable even in decent quality no tuning efforts for solo play as all other woodwinds: ear and breathing technique trained traditional instrument for an orchestra many small ensemble formations and musical styles open to choose neighbour-friendly (closing the ...


7

It's not just recorder music! About 100 years ago a lot of composers felt music wasn't developing interestingly enough and made a conscious break from 'common practice' - which might (very) loosely be described as 'music with tunes'. Sometimes this manifested as a quest for instrumental 'alternative techniques'. (I believe it is actually illegal today ...


6

Sounds like the violin is in tune, but the recorder is out of tune. It's most likely just the recorder. There may be a couple of possibilities here. Try to determine how far out of tune (and in which direction) the recorder is, either using a tuner or by ear. Recorders can be tuned by pulling out the head joint from the body. If the recorder's pitch is too ...


6

Soprano and Alto recorders are pretty cheap, relatively speaking. Honestly, it may be worthwhile to explore the possibility of purchasing new instruments. Unlike wood recorders, a plastic recorder's sound will not improve / mature over time, so if the cost of fixing them is comparable to purchasing new ones, it may be a viable alternative. Personally, if ...


6

It'll depend a lot on your son's musical taste as to what he's likely to be inspired by, but try to find music that shows off the recorder both as a solo instrument and working with other instruments. So some of the baroque sonatas by Handel or Telemann - which are also quite accessible to the intermediate player - would be a good starting point. For ...


6

The basic answer (which applies to carbon fiber stringed instruments too) is that our current understanding of materials science is insufficient to produce a material which exhibits as "flat", i.e. uniform frequency resonance curve as wood. Keep in mind that it takes a lot of skill to select proper wood -- there's a reason reed instruments are made ...


6

It seems there is a large recorder making community, with a vast and very useful set of resources here. There are some links to technical plans, however a lot of them are for alto recorder rather than tenor, and even more still are stored on microfiche in libraries and not accessible online. Having said that: This PDF has a graph detailing bore diameters ...


6

As Tim commented, warm water may loosen the grease, but for stuck woodwind joints we usually use a refrigerator or freezer. Chilling the plastic and/or grease can both shrink the joint and make the grease less adhesive. Recorders that don't have cork or thread wrapping in the joints shouldn't be greased to try to make tight joints fit. Greasing the plastic ...


6

Out of the entire extended flute family, you've managed to name three that are about as far apart as they get! However, I'd still say that all woodwind fingerings are more similar than not. The fife is among the oldest flutes that still get some use, and the fingerings are identical to the tin whistle (a.k.a. pennywhistle, Irish whistle). It has six holes ...


5

Curved windways are usually considered to give a more interesting, complex tone quality, but I couldn't give an acoustic reason for this. They're definitely more difficult to produce I've also heard it suggested that a curved windway is superior because it allows condensation to drain to the edges of the windway more easily, where it will interfere less. ...


5

The high D is actually pretty easy on my tenor (Rottenburgh). You have to pinch the thumb hole (covering somewhere around half of it) and then four of the first six top holes, leaving both middle fingers off (also both pinkies, though you never use the left pinky anyway—I just wanted to be clear). Imagine that an X indicates a closed hole and an O indicates ...


5

In my opinion, what works for you is what works. Everyone's hands, wrists, and recorders are different. You seem to be analyzing your movements with great attention to detail; keep doing that. Practicing the 'best' movements will get them into your muscle memory and they'll become, if not quite second nature, at least third. You may find that you'll use ...


5

By nature, recorders (especially wooden ones) are sensitive beasts, and producing reliable high notes can be difficult. So a few random thoughts: The instrument must be scrupulously clean. A wooden recorder may need the block removed so that the windway can be cleaned and the block smoothed. A simple but scary job. Damage around the labium area will cause ...


5

By design, the lowest note on a soprano recorder is C5 (which is in fact an octave above middle C). And unlike the high end, the low end of a wind instrument's range can't be arbitrarily extended through agressive overblowing or something, so this might well be answered “it's just not possible”. However, a B4 can actually be intoned, if badly, by partially ...


5

If your low notes are coming out an octave too high, and you are blowing very gently, then the most likely problem is that one or more of the fingerholes is not completely closed. You must make sure your fingers are not allowing any air to leak at all, which is difficult to do and requires practice.


5

I had the exact same experience with my Aulos tenor recorder. You really don't have to blow much harder to get an overblown octave. I also found that the angle of the stream of air is important so make sure the position of the beak in your mouth is right. Also make sure that all your finger holes are properly closed, especially your right ring finger that ...


5

Not contradicting @DrSvanHay's source, which actually only arguments, that a trill may be marked as +: This is just indicating any kind of embellishment, I'm not sure, whether due to sloppiness of the composer or copyist, but I frequently find it also in fast movements on very short notes, where a trill will never fit in. As example see here in a ...


5

Have a look at the picture at https://www.moeck.com/en/service/faq/the-recorder-family.html. The instruments are indeed (roughly, at least) scaled proportionally in all three dimensions. I would do that, especially since you're talking about a small change of scale rather than printing an alto or tenor recorder from plans for a soprano. I would try to ...


5

As you've observed, the intonation of a recorder is highly sensitive to the pressure it's played at, i.e. to the dynamics. It should not be understood as a “keyed” instrument where the fingers just select from a discrete number of pitches and the mouth is only responsible for dynamics and phrasing, but rather as a “fretless” instrument where the fingers ...


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