14

The simplest difference to grasp is 'intended use'. In one sentence, professional vs consumer. High impedance mics are cheap & cheerful, designed to plug straight into computer headset sockets. The computer's circuitry is equally cheap & cheerful. They go hand in hand. You can't plug a low impedance mic directly into a cheap computer headset/mic ...


13

No piece of electronic equipment appreciates being dropped. Stage-ready dynamics are tougher than most, studio condensers are not. Treat a large diaphragm condenser like you'd treat a high-end DSLR camera. Pack it in a flight case or other sturdy box with adequate padding so it doesn't get rattled around & don't put it in checked baggage ever. Just to ...


9

Can you adjust the pickup height? That would be my first adjustment, assuming the rest feels right while you're playing it. Any other adjustment would change how it plays. Dropping the pickup back would make it cleaner-sounding & a tad quieter, but wouldn't change what it's like to actually play.


9

As existing answers & comments have established, forget Zoom. Also forget trying to run 50 sets of headphones through an amp - as far as I know 8 channels is luxury in headphone amps, unless you have a language lab you can borrow one from. However, if your 'backing mix' is in mono & you use a pair of speakers with flipped phase on one side [literally ...


8

I noticed the volume on my phone was only about 60% or so. I changed it to max volume and recorded again and it totally fixed my problem. Turns out the volume I was recording at was just too low, so it ended up being sort of drowned out by the normal amount of static, so it was more noticeable. Thanks to all who offered input!


8

Sounds like some sort of AVC (Automatic Volume Control). Otherwise known as a rudimentary compressor on the input to prevent recording overload. It kicked in on the attack transient of the piano note and didn’t recover quickly enough not to kill the beginning of the sustain. It’s called ‘pumping’. Piano is a very dynamic sound - big initial transient ...


8

I definitely have my doubts about the approach. (Also, TLDR spoiler: It's not really a new problem, and there are other solutions.) Among the problems a pessimist could imagine: On recording day, you open yourself up to "My device isn't working/ran out of batteries/my headphones aren't working/I'm having trouble with the wifi" etc. times 50. The ...


6

Like Laurence mentioned, it sounds like recorder adaptively changed the gain of the microphone as you were recording to prevent it from clipping. You might have luck repairing the audio with a program called iZotope RX. I believe that it has a preset designed to fix sudden drops in gain.


6

Most modern audio electronics are designed to be linear. That means that ideally, it shouldn't matter how much signal level you have: the output level simply scales along with the input level, with no change in the signal quality. In practice, that's never quite true. The most prominent factors are: If you get over the clipping threshold, it... well, clips. ...


6

Funny, I have been doing some recording this week - first time for several months - and found the takes to be sloppy, particularly on bass, which never came over during the gigs each week. It may have been due to the new set of headphones, but that's no excuse! So, I had to clean up my playing - taking care changing frets, etc, to eliminate as much of that ...


6

Horribly complicated and prone to glitches. Do it this way. Record the accompaniment. Point some speakers at the singers. Point some microphones at the singers. As far as possible, try not to point the microphones at the speakers! Yes, you'll get bleed. But you WANT the accompaniment in the recording :-) Maybe you could wire everyone up to headphones (...


5

I certainly wouldn't be using a condenser mic anywhere apart from the studio. Travelling with one, it'd be in its own special drop-resistant case. Dynamics are fairly bomb-proof, but I still wince when I see one fall off a mic stand - and if it's mine there's hell to pay. Buy one by all means, but be very protective of it, don't let anyone near if possibe, ...


5

If your guitar has a piezo transducer, then it's likely to be accentuating string & fret noise because of the way it works. Miking it up would probably sound a whole lot sweeter.


5

It's not possible, you need some kind of signal amplifier between the guitar and the phone. The guitar has huge internal impedance, so the input impedance must be around a megaohm to sound right. The headset jack has impedance of few hundred ohms, so it would need much more current than the guitar pickup can provide. Or less technically, the signal from the ...


5

The phantom power is only applied across pins on the XLR connections. A guitar plugged in with a 1/4” cable will not have the phantom power voltage on that connection.


4

There is no way to get "real" feedback using headphones only, however there are a couple of fake solutions: A sustainiac, or sustainer pickup will give you feedback which is similar, if not exactly like audio feedback through magnetic feedback. A sustainer pedal emulates sustain electronically. Many DAW's will let you add fake sustain at any ...


4

It won't be real. It can't be real. Feedback is the speaker vibrating the guitar, which feeds the speaker, same so forth. I own a guitar with a Fernandes Sustainer system, which sends the signal through an electromagnet in the neck pickup. It's somewhat disappointing without gain or compression, but some would say that most things about the electric guitar ...


4

Tape is historically notoriously noisy. In the late 80s/early 90s when it was still a popular format for pre-recorded music there were a number of innovative noise suppression technologies (Dolby B, Dolby C, Dolby S) but the crux of the problem is the density of magnetic particles in the emulsion and the tape speed. Best bet for high quality recording on ...


4

Option 2 is the traditional way and would still be considered the “proper” one by many engineers. Obviously though, the Frontman isn't exactly a boutique amp, so you shouldn't be surprised if this doesn't give results that are as good as what you hear on professional records. To go the amp route you should Have an amp whose sound you really like. Typically ...


4

This is expected behaviour. There is a fundamental difference between integer and floating formats: Integer represents always a fixed amplitude range, generally interpreted as [-1, 1], uniformly covering this interval with e.g. 65536 equal steps in case of 16-bit. that means that any value outside of the range cannot be represented at all, because there ...


4

An excerpt from the wikipedia page on the Traveling Wilburys, a rock "supergroup" of sorts: The term "Wilbury" also originated during the Cloud Nine sessions. Referring to recording errors created by faulty equipment, Harrison jokingly remarked to Lynne, "We'll bury 'em in the mix." Thereafter, they used the term for any small ...


4

Strings with flat winding do exist. They have disadvantages, but they eliminate the sliding sound to a great extent. Disadvantages may be narrow vibrato, higher price and shorter usable life. You may or may not like their sound as well. Try different positions and orientations of the piezo transducer. There should exist an orientation where it is almost ...


4

It's generally OK to send a headphone output to a line-level input. You may need to adjust the headphone volume to a suitable level to get a clear low noise but un-distorted signal. A headphone output is generally much too high for a microphone input. It probably won't damage it, but the sound will be too loud and distorted.


4

Yes, you can do this. According to focusrite, "48V Phantom power is not sent to any 1/4" jack inputs, these are used for line or instrument inputs." So, plug the microphone into your interface with an XLR cable, and plug the guitar into your interface with a 1/4" instrument cable. It will work.


4

The best way to have any recording sound good is to make a good sounding recording in the first place. This is not an easy task. Excellent recording engineers have usually spent at least a decade learning their craft. Like most things, the right equipment helps but can’t make someone without skills sound like someone with skills. So you have to study and ...


3

I don’t think there is any difference in sound quality, or at least if there is, it’s so minimal that it’s overshadowed by all the other design elements of the headphones. The reason why different impedances are available is to work better with different devices. If you buy the highest impedance set and plug it into your smart phone, you may find that even ...


3

All 3 at once. Mic'd amp because you know how it sounds and what you record is what you get DI'd signal so you have something to re-amp if you don't like #1 GT-6 because why not? Then at mix time you can work with a blend of the 3 to achieve whatever you want.


3

When recording a take folder in Logic, you can create multiple "comps". Your first comp should be "Comp A". In your bottom image, if you click on the B next to the disclosure triangle, you will get a menu list of all you comps and each individual takes. Click on "Comp A" to revert to it. Here's what I get after recording a new ...


3

Wrapping up what I found out researching: There are lots of samplers out there, commercial, free, expensive, less expensive. The comments and answers regarding samplers helped me to find the right search terms. If you have Cubase already, the new sampler track of Cubase 11 is able to do a lot of this already out of the box. But there are not very much ...


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