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If you are in one tempo which then changes to another slower tempo, which stays in time, then that's what you rehearse. If it needs doing with a metronome, so be it. Set that metronome to the last verse slower tempo, and start it on beat one of the slower part. Repetition is the only way. Keep doing it until that new tempo is assigned to the last part in ...


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To my experience, the drummer/percussionist is responsible for deciding the tempo of a song, and he/she is also responsible for tempo changes. Other band members follow the drummer's/percussionist's tempo and their responsibility is not to differ from the drummer's tempo. Yes, I think it is his job to dictate the tempo change but it is not a simple task. ...


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Do one or more of the following Right before the tempo change, have everyone play a long note on e.g. the first beat of the last bar and let it ring. (perhaps except for the designated tempo announcer player/instrument) Designate one of the players like drummer, percussionist or guitarist, to announce the new tempo as a "... three, four" count-in into the ...


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That’s a big question and I’m sure I won’t cover every possibility, but here goes with my thoughts ... The tempo change is owned equally by everyone, not just the percussionist, and it is everyone’s responsibility to make it work. It’s partly down to our old friend practice, in that if you rehearse it enough and listen to each other it will become more ...


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This is common among inline preamps; if it consumes phantom 48V, it won't pass it "upstream" to the mic or other equipment. You shouldn't need a new phantom power source between the preamp and audio interface as long as the interface is powering the preamp well enough. But you will either need a phantom power injector between the preamp and the condenser ...


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