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1

For the bit/sample rate, I am sure this kind of information can be found in the user manual, or maybe by asking Roland directly. Uncle Bob is totally right saying that, if you can record using the USB of the Juno, meaning that it will, kind of, act as a sound card (it will seen as a sound card by the computer, but is not actually a sound card as no sound is ...


2

It's not so much how 'shiny' the external mic pre is [the Focusrites are pretty standard entry- to mid-level devices] it's more how appalling laptop default inputs are. A 'named manufacturer' dedicated mic pre is a basic essential, not a luxury. An additional note - perching your mic directly on top of of a laptop is a sure-fire way to introduce extraneous ...


3

I suspect TheRealAnswer(TM) here is: realism. As others mentioned in passing, we have multiple sonic inputs which allow us to determine directionality to rather high angular accuracy (in 3-D, by the way). A monophonic playback is by definition generated from a single source (not even a phased array, for you radar jocks out there), and thus your ears ...


4

This is quite broad topic, difficult to cover in a short answer. Let's focus on recording. Recording an acoustic source (instrument, band, orchestra...) in stereo means using a pair of microphones to capture the stereo image. Some of the popular techniques are: XY (pair of crossed directional microphones) MS (see: What is the definition of Mid-side stereo ...


5

There's mono. There's mono pan-potted between two speakers. And there's 'real stereo'. They all have their uses. There's little point in running a PA system in stereo unless the bulk of the audience will be positioned more-or-less optimally. They'll just hear a bad mix. Mostly, DAW users deal with mono sources panned somewhere between hard L and hard R. ...


3

Since the majority of us have two ears, and always listen and hear in stereo naturally, why would we want mono? Mono was used initially in recordings as one mic was deemed sufficient, since two weren't going to be used for much for a while yet. I think stereo was discovered by accident - at which point two mics were being used, but not for stereo purposes; ...


2

Audio interface or not, you will need a program that lets you hear your "microphone" in real time (whether that is an actual microphone or a guitar is irrelevant, from the software side of things.) There are free and paid solutions for this, such as Garageband, Logic, FL Studio, and Reason. Without an audio interface, there are a couple of extra ...


3

For woodwinds and brass the standard is to write a separate part for each instrument. If you are combining parts in the score it's usual to indicate a solo as "1." or "2." and then "a2" (or "a3") afterwards. Each of the five string section parts is put on one part (although you could theoretically combine the first and ...


1

You'll need a USB guitar cable and an amp simulator program (there are several free ones).


1

The passage in question has natural trumpet as well as horn which will make intonation more difficult or even impossible. On a horn, the hand can be used to adjust the pitch, but you cannot do this on a natural trumpet. It is possible to adjust the pitch slightly with the lips, but this can only go so far. You can probably correct the B flat and D harmonics, ...


5

Others have described the theoretical basis -- that one can convert to a higher voltage with a corresponding drop in amperage. To go into the specifics for this hardware, I own a SSL 2+ and a USB-C power meter, so I'm able to produce actual measurements of the power draw with and without phantom power turned on. :) These are instantanious snapshots -- if we ...


0

If you want to record on computer with a Dynamic microfone, you need an Audio Interface because computer audio input is not designed for it. You can even mess up with the motherboard. If you want to record without Dynamic mic, you can use those simple desktop mics or headset built-in mics, but again the quality is bad, worst than a mobile phone mic. Most ...


2

Nothing is necessary. However, a USB audio interface will dramatically increase the sound quality, even with a cheap microphone. You don't have to invest in expensive devices. Even an entry-level interface will give you enough sound clarity to do a very decent job. Focusrite Scarlett models are the best sellers for amateurs because they are reasonably priced ...


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