17

The admonition I run into again and again, attributed to such lights as Thelonius Monk and Louis Armstrong is "play the melody." Of course you will syncopate it, put a little ornamentation here and there, but simple is fine That covers soloing pretty well, but what about comping? Guitarists with jazz chops rarely hang on the same voicing for more than a ...


15

Sounds to me like he's pushing his voice a lot harder to get over the band volume. In an acoustic situation, he's singing in a more relaxed way, but put all the instruments in, at a volume which is probably unnecessary anyway, and the sing becomes more of a shout. By turning up his mic a balance will partially be restored, (but his ears will still tell him ...


11

While sound proofing can be very effective, sound can be very easily transmitted through air and solid like walls or floors. So in a condo you may be able to sound proof your walls to limit the sound to neighbours, but as anyone who has ever lived above a neighbour knows, your floor will transmit a lot of sound. A detached house will be much better, as ...


10

Craig, the other answers all address the possibility that his "singing nowhere near as good" is because he's getting drowned out by the other band members. There's another possiblity as well. If he sings very well by himself, accompanying himself, that doesn't necessarily translate into singing well with other people who are accompanying him. It's a ...


9

As part answer ( the rest later), the 'can't hear you' syndrome makes everyone turn up, and the listening is even more difficult. It should be possible - often is - for a band, just about any band, to be able to play without monitors. I've done without for a couple of years, at gigs up to 300 people, by keeping volumes down so everyone can actually hear. ...


8

I agree with Tim. A lot of bands tend to crank up their instruments way too loudly which is unfortunate. Everybody wants to be heard. Vocals are crucial for a vocal based band and the band should really work on mixing. Things you can do are make sure that the Vocalist can be heard clearly over all of the other instruments, especially the lead guitar and ...


8

Raise the stands! Seen it a zillion times. The music stands need to be set high enough that the conductor's upper body is visible just above the top edge of the music. That way they can read the music AND receive visual input from the conductor simultaneously. The problem with having to "look up" is then you get lost when you look down again.


8

A suggestion for an exercise: Select a short passage of music of say four bars that involve everyone and has room for some conducting work in terms of dynamic or tempo changes. Go through it until everyone can play it without looking at the music. Then have everyone look at you, while playing that passage over and over again. Each time you do something ...


8

It takes more time and effort, but seeing your potential future bandmates in action is the best way. It means that you may have to go to the venues that these folks play in, and I don't know if you're old enough to get into some of these places. If you are old enough, try not to get sucked in by the drink-your-face-off-at-the-open-mic scenario. You can see ...


8

As I'm quite easily affected by alcohol and caffeine (being a lightweight and having terrible problems with focusing does that to you), I think I can add some stuff from my own experience here. The main thought to keep in mind is that this is different for each person individually, though. A dose that works for you may very well have an opposite effect for ...


8

As I see it, only you and your bandmates can answer this, because it depends on what you want to do. First off, if you're not gigging... what exactly are you rehearsing for? Someone needs to step up and book gigs, or else I don't see why there's a band in the first place. Assuming you have gigs at some schedule, then I see rehearsal potentially doing three ...


8

This is not a question of whether the band is rehearsing the right way or the wrong way. Since the band has existed longer than you've been a member, and the other members are content with the situation, the band's current rehearsal seems to fit the goals of the other members. They might be more interested in playing comfortable material than pushing ...


8

Omitting either I or J appears to be fairly commonplace. Gardner Read's Music Notation: A Manual of Modern Practice says that "the letters I or J are usually omitted, the consecutive lettering going from H to J or from I to K" (p. 43). G. Schirmer's internal style guide, The G. Schirmer/AMP Manual of Style and Usage (3rd edition), says of rehearsal marks "[w]...


7

One golden rule. Play less. Lay out. Leave space. If there's someone in the group who CAN play jazz, allow him room to do it. And have fun! Let the music go where it will. Don't rehearse it to death. If it's your turn to play a solo, the melody will be just fine.


6

Lots of eye contact and body language is essential to an improv band and also creates a stronger bond


6

I think that every piece of music deserves the best possible method of being prepared in a such a way that both the musicians and audience have a pleasing experience. Preparation includes time, rehearsal, and every member stepping up to meet the challenge including the conductor's interpretation so that the entire group is a part of the solution. If your ...


6

In band rehearsal, the mix typically isn't really good anywhere in the room. And it needn't be, because since everybody has their own amp, there's very good spatial separation. Which is almost as useful as frequency separation for making everything audible. To fully exploit this, make sure everybody hears everybody else from a different direction, i.e. place ...


5

There is also an app for that: BandFriend. It's a free app for both iPhone (iOS) and Android phones for connecting local musicians. App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id510681565?mt=8 Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.touchbee.bandfriend


5

Most bands especially when they are starting out use one of their band mate's houses to practice. It will typically be at the drummers house since that is typically the hardest instrument to move. A little more specifically if they practice at a band mate's house rehearsal will typically be in the garage or basement as that is again typically where someone ...


5

Let's just say you want to play as loud as you would in a concert. A little googling turns up 110 to 120db being a pretty standard range for concert volumes. The city of Binghamton, NY, USA conveniently posts their noise ordinance as a helpful chart. I'm not sure how representative these are, but they limit levels of sound in multi-unit buildings to 45db at ...


5

One question that this spawns is Has the band played many gigs - in the 6 mths you've been with them? I suspect the answer is no. Too much time spent (wasted) in rehearsals to have a playlist of enough numbers. Sounds harsh. But I've been (for short times, I hasten to add!) in bands like this. I call them 'rehearsal bands' as this is all they do! Some do it ...


5

I would recommend against using terms like "Verse," "Bridge," "Intro," etc. unless the piece is clearly referencing that stylistic norm. Why don't you think A, B, C, etc. make a lot of sense in "modern" music pieces? I've certainly seen it done this way. Otherwise, plenty of scores simply give the measure number in a large box, thus serving two roles as ...


5

he can skip the difficult passage and look at it next time play the passage without the whole section or ask the overtaxed players to take a rest during these bars choose another piece and ask the whole orchestra to practice the difficult piece at home practice in different sections and send the group with a deputy bandmaster or a section leader (or any ...


4

The best way I've seen conductors solve this problem is by "changing it up" with their conducting. I've played in bands for a long time, and I've found nothing more effective. For example. In the middle of a piece, change the tempo. When a small percentage of the students actually catch what you're doing, they'll follow you. The others, when hearing that ...


4

Everyone play to the drummer. This might sound obvious but it's a serious answer. I've played the worst venues all over europe and bad sound onstage is any touring musicians worst nightmare. What is true almost 100% of the time is that everyone can hear the drummer. So, everyone tune to the drummer and trust that everyone else is doing the same and you'll ...


4

The live music industry is increasingly moving towards IEMs (in-ear monitors). With a bit of work, a good setup can be as cheap as having your own wedges, and it ensures that, as long as the mix is good, you have perfectly reproducable results no matter what the stage acoustics are like. You may balk at the cost of some higher-end systems ($1000 for custom ...


4

I joined a band, as a bass player, where we DID have a drummer but I was the only member with any sort of "formal" music training (rhythm exercises, reading music, etc.) and we had similar problems. Our timing was off, and we'd drag sometimes. We'd all stay together, but we couldn't play anything tight. What worked for me, to get the issue of rhythm into ...


4

The letters are the rehearsal marks. Simply naming a section verse, chorus, bridge, ect. is not using rehearsal marks. The purpose of rehearsal marks are to have "a checkpoint" when rehearsing the piece. You are not actually name the section A, B, C, ect., but you are referencing an absolute position on the score to pick up playing the piece in rehearsal. ...


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