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I think the issue may be about idiom versus "correct" but unnatural grammar. A language metaphor may help. "Put your toys away" would be an idiomatic expression. "Reposition the toys you played with to the toy storage container" is grammatically correct and has the same meaning, but is unnatural. If you listened to and were ...


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As @Brian THOMAS alludes to in a note, you do recognize intervals - in the case he mentions, the octave leap in Happy Birthday. Or consider the famous third in the opening of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. Or in fact the fifth in the opening notes of Twinkle. Perhaps the issue here is not so much recognition as nomenclature - we use user-friendly names for ...


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I have a simple answer: Repetition. Melodies usually contain repeated elements and are usually repeated themselves. Bare intervals are more atomic structures that do not inherently contain any repetition or content. And that leads to another difference: Emotion. Famous melodies are famous because of the mood and/or emotion they evoke. Cognitive research ...


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Unlike intervals, which just describe ratio of pitches, melodies have also rhythm. Rhythm is a very important component of music. A melody played with a different rhythm might be completely unrecognizable. You may even have trouble to recognize the original harmony, since if strong and weak beats change, the melody may suggest different chords. On the ...


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It would be easier to remember intervals if they let us remember intervals like we remember melodies: we don't need to immediately generalize them in all keys, they mentioned their names in tight association with their musical appearances more often, we didn't get subjected to stressful practice drills with no sheet music by teachers trying to get us to ...


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A melody is way more remarkable than an isolated interval. A melody like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star you listen to it even before you're born. So, it's ingrained in your ear. It's one of the principles that keep alive systems like The Suzuki Method. Often time when doing ear training we use melodies as a reference for recognizing intervals. A complete ...


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If you can sing or identify notes without other reference notes, you have perfect pitch. In particular, if you can always sing or identify a note precisely from a cold start -- i.e. let's say first thing in the morning -- that qualifies as perfect pitch. Having some reference pitch present in your mind, after you have been singing or playing or listening, ...


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Even though you have a "memorized" reference pitch in your "mind's ear", the fact that you use it to identify other pitches suggests you have relative pitch plus a particularly strong memory for your reference pitch. Absolute (perfect) pitch generally means that you simply "know" a pitch without reference to any other pitch, ...


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