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1

I don't mean ear training - naming intervals, or playing back melodic phrases by ear. I mean - becoming better at noticing when you are perhaps 20 or 30 cents out on a note. For instance if I play certain octave intervals on saxophone they do tend to be slightly wide. It is all to easy to get used to that. I am interested in how to become more aware of it. ...


2

I concur with the other answers that you are looking for movable system ear training, even if all you want is to improve your internal tuner. As Richard pointed out, a movable system teaches you the function of each note within the context of the scale. Once you have a feeling for this function, you will have a much easier time recognizing when you are not ...


3

I agree with Richard learning and training solfege (movable do re mi) practicing all scales and modes and intervals from the same tone. But there is another training that was the greatest benefit to me: By trying to play or notate melodies, tunes of well known songs, and controlling my writing with an instrument. Later you can continue with your own ...


6

The absolute best exercise to train your relative pitch is to sing music on some kind of movable system. This is because movable systems—like movable do and scale-degree numbers—teach you the function of what you're singing, which is ultimately exactly what relative pitch is. (Fixed systems, like fixed do, do not teach function, which is why I believe it's ...


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