16

I have to say that I don't know much about heavy metal, but this sounds like what I imagine to be death metal. I did a bit of searching on that premise, and I found one site that classifies (I think) this band as "Epic/Medieval Black Metal." I do know a bit about medieval music, although I'm no expert, and this sounds almost nothing like medieval ...


15

The brief answer is no, at least nothing like the modern sense. The more nuanced answer is sort of and sometimes. First, let's note that score format did exist historically early on. Almost all polyphonic Western music from its earliest forms (ca. late 8th or early 9th century) to the early 1200s was in score format. (See, for example, Notre Dame polyphony,...


14

I agree with the comments that this sounds vanishingly little like actual medieval music. However, it does have some elements that can be loosely associated with medieval music -- church music in particular -- combined with modern movie-soundtrack conceptions of how best to accompany medieval battle scenes. Unison vocals accompanied (in unison) by ...


7

As noted in comments, some of this is dependent on genre. As Albrecht notes in another answer, military music made use of drums and sometimes other percussion in all periods. Same thing with ceremonial music that often had militaristic ensembles playing at it. It seems like dance music for popular use also made frequent use of percussion. However, ...


7

Metal draws very heavily from modes, especially those with ♭II like the Phrygian. Because distorted guitar sounds make multi-voice leading impossible (the sound is too muddy), things like traditional cadences are less important in metal. Tension has to come from melodic motion instead: lots of ♭II, tritones, movement by very unusual intervals, and so on. ...


6

These terms did not designate vocal ranges; rather, they designated relationships between the various parts. Voice-parts. The following designations of voice-parts are found in MSS. [manuscripts]: Cantus, discantus, superius, triplex, medius, altus, contratenor, tenor, bassus, quintus, sextus. These should not be taken to be descriptive of the character of ...


6

What Zarlino (by way of the Greeks) is talking about is proportions of small integers. The octave, for example, has a ratio of 2:1; the fifth 3:2. Zarlino is arguing that since the fourth has a ratio of 4:3, it, too, like the fifth and octave, should be considered a consonance. So even though other intervals are "rational" in the modern ...


5

The "in due" here means to conduct it in two. This edition is written in common (4/4) time, which is often conducted in four. But the directions here state that the piece is slow, but conducted in two. Otherwise, if someone were to conduct it slowly in four, it may actually end up being twice as slow as intended (hence the "ma in due": but in two). And the ...


5

The letters correspond to particular tablature of the 5-sting guitar popular at the time. Here's one tablature translation from: http://www.patriciadixon.net/guitar-lit-html/italianbaroque.htm


5

This is what the Wikipedia article on the piece says. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuper_rosarum_flores


5

The examples you cite are settings intended for alternatim performance. In this practice, there are two choirs. One sings the first half of each verse of the psalm or canticle, and the other sings the second half. Sometimes, this is apparent in a polyphonic setting because, while both choirs are polyphonic, there are different numbers of voices. Allegri'...


4

Yes, they really wrote like this, just as much as people today write (or sometimes do not write) letters like V or K with straight strokes and sharp angles. The printing style is based on the handwriting style, not the other way around. See for example this manuscript from the early 1500s: Remember, the paper they were writing on was not necessarily as ...


3

Sorry to just cut and paste a definition. Maybe a ancient music scholar will post a more in depth answer. I found this footnote in a book of Tudor vocal music. It seems like a good starting place. Apparently the terms are less about range and more about the role of the parts - ex. tenor sings the plainsong - and their relative relationships within the ...


3

What, all of them? The sleeve notes, mentioning all the players and instruments on each track are here. Nice noise, isn't it! Praetorius-New-London-Consort-Philip-Pickett-Dances-From-Terpsichore


3

Non instrument-specific music was standard in the era of Renaissance for several reasons: The number of instruments was far bigger (think of bagpipes, shawms, Gemshorn, hurdy-gurdy, some of these even being built in families) so the chance of a match was smaller. Printing of scores only got wider use in late 15th/early 16th century and manual copies were ...


3

There are two books which I would recommend for dealing with this voice-leading. It is best to approach the subject in order of the texts. The first is a book which describes the actual methods and instruction of composers of the era, from a historical and theoretical point of view. There is much in the book for instructing oneself to write in the style. It ...


3

It becomes plainer in the context of the whole passage. I think it's clear that he's talking about the 'minor=sad, major=happy' thing. Interesting that he also considers diatonic notes 'masculine and virile', chromatics as 'effeminate and languishing'. I'm not sure we have enough extant material to judge whether Morley's language was normal for the time....


3

petrucci-f4 is not a "word" according to LilyPond syntax. so your input is equivalent to \clef "petrucci-f" 4 In version 2.18, the 4 will trigger a syntax error. In version 2.19 (well, for most of 2.19.x), the 4 is an extra quarter note with the pitch of the preceding note. Since there is no preceding note in that score, more or less a default c' will ...


3

The fourth gets a funny treatment in music theory. Acoustically, as the inversion of the fifth, it acts like a consonance. However, for some reasons that I'm not sure of, the fourth is treated as a dissonance against the bass note but a consonance between upper voices. One explanation that I have read is that a fourth (in two-part harmony) tends to indicate ...


3

I have always had the understanding that in the days before paper became affordable, composers probably used chalk boards or wax tablets to coordinate the different parts. I don't think there is any clear documentation of this anywhere, however. Once they could reasonably start sketching with paper and pencil, they probably did that too, but I do not know ...


2

Yes, many ensembles do pay attention to differences in Latin pronunciation at different times and places. The classic (and only really comprehensive) guide is Harold Copeman's Singing in Latin, or Pronunciation Explor'd, 1990, which is out of print but possibly available used. I haven't found any online resources yet for historical pronunciation. There's ...


2

Monteverdi’s Orfeo as artistic creed Uri Golomb In this paper of 15 pages you’ll find vast information about the background of Monteverdi’s work, the Artusi-Monteverdi controversy, Galilei vs. Monteverdi, Musical structures and stylistic eclecticism and more: Ars Polemica: Monteverdi’s Orfeo as artistic creed Monteverdi’s lavish and detailed orchestration ...


2

This answer doesn't explain why there werde used less percussion instruments in the common practice period. It rather says it was rarely used in the western art-music while it was quite common in Renaissance "pop"music. For centuries, drums were instruments of the traveling minstrels and the military. In European military music of the Middle Ages ...


2

Seems like all you have to do is have an instrument play a single-note line that is a fixed interval below the melody line. So if you have a synth playing a certain melody, then another synth or guitar or anything else playing the same melody transposed a 3rd, 4th, 6th or some other interval below the main melody would be using fauxbourdon. One exception is ...


2

In looking through Gombert scores on IMSLP, I see no evidence that Gombert composed glissandos or a change in octave.


2

(This is supposed to be a comment!) Maybe these scores you present are transcriptions of mensural notation, which allowed for a special notation for ligatures in vocal music. Brackets above the notes are used to represent ligatures in transcriptions of mensural notation to modern notation. You may find many details on the transcription of mensural notation ...


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