5

The "in due" here means to conduct it in two. This edition is written in common (4/4) time, which is often conducted in four. But the directions here state that the piece is slow, but conducted in two. Otherwise, if someone were to conduct it slowly in four, it may actually end up being twice as slow as intended (hence the "ma in due": but in two). And the ...


5

This is what the Wikipedia article on the piece says. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuper_rosarum_flores


4

The letters correspond to particular tablature of the 5-sting guitar popular at the time. Here's one tablature translation from: http://www.patriciadixon.net/guitar-lit-html/italianbaroque.htm


3

There are two books which I would recommend for dealing with this voice-leading. It is best to approach the subject in order of the texts. The first is a book which describes the actual methods and instruction of composers of the era, from a historical and theoretical point of view. There is much in the book for instructing oneself to write in the style. It ...


3

Non instrument-specific music was standard in the era of Renaissance for several reasons: The number of instruments was far bigger (think of bagpipes, shawms, Gemshorn, hurdy-gurdy, some of these even being built in families) so the chance of a match was smaller. Printing of scores only got wider use in late 15th/early 16th century and manual copies were ...


3

It becomes plainer in the context of the whole passage. I think it's clear that he's talking about the 'minor=sad, major=happy' thing. Interesting that he also considers diatonic notes 'masculine and virile', chromatics as 'effeminate and languishing'. I'm not sure we have enough extant material to judge whether Morley's language was normal for the time....


3

petrucci-f4 is not a "word" according to LilyPond syntax. so your input is equivalent to \clef "petrucci-f" 4 In version 2.18, the 4 will trigger a syntax error. In version 2.19 (well, for most of 2.19.x), the 4 is an extra quarter note with the pitch of the preceding note. Since there is no preceding note in that score, more or less a default c' will ...


2

(This is supposed to be a comment!) Maybe these scores you present are transcriptions of mensural notation, which allowed for a special notation for ligatures in vocal music. Brackets above the notes are used to represent ligatures in transcriptions of mensural notation to modern notation. You may find many details on the transcription of mensural notation ...


2

Yes, many ensembles do pay attention to differences in Latin pronunciation at different times and places. The classic (and only really comprehensive) guide is Harold Copeman's Singing in Latin, or Pronunciation Explor'd, 1990, which is out of print but possibly available used. I haven't found any online resources yet for historical pronunciation. There's ...


2

Seems like all you have to do is have an instrument play a single-note line that is a fixed interval below the melody line. So if you have a synth playing a certain melody, then another synth or guitar or anything else playing the same melody transposed a 3rd, 4th, 6th or some other interval below the main melody would be using fauxbourdon. One exception is ...


1

In the score of his madrigal Ah, dolente partita! it says "Lento, ma in due". Lento means slow, right? But what exactly is it that is to be divided in two? A literal translation into English is probably best: "Slowly, but in two." "In two" means that there should be two beats per measure. This affects not only the tempo, but also the phrasing and the ...


1

The first edition is available on IMSLP, and has no tempo markings at all (which was customary at that time - musicians were expected to be intelligent). It was not written in "common (4/4) time". As the first edition shows, it didn't even have bar lines. The "C" notation in the original does not mean "4/4 time" but simply indicates how the different note ...


1

Yes. Elaborating on ttw's to-the-point answer: one of counterpoint's general aims is how to write voices that keep the listener's attention engaged over a sustained passage of time, by avoiding redundancy or "cheating," particularly the redundancy encoded in two-species rules. Those rules apply at all time scales, to all pairs of voices. It's tedious to ...


1

Yes. Otherwise one loses the feel of 3 independent parts.


1

This is an example of mensural notation, common in the 14th and 15th centuries. You are correct that the clue is the split common-time symbol, which was one of the symbols (along with the common time symbol) that carried over into modern notation. (By the way, this wasn't a "c" for "common," rather it was an open circle for "imperfect" time, meaning a breve ...


1

The part you are referring to is in D# natural minor. Although the natural minor scale (aka Aeolian mode) is commonly found in classical music, this particular piece still sounds pretty modern to me. For similar music, I would suggest that you listen to Blind Guardian. Their music is mostly Middle-Earth/Lord of the Ring fantasy-themed and very epic. Many ...


1

(@Monica Cellio asked that I expand my comment into an answer.) The beginning looks like a top voice to me because of its 3-fold repetition in semibreves D-D-D then breve C. The lowest line of the page looks to me like a tenor that could go with it: D D Eb F F F -- it doesn't exactly work, but it gives me a sense of what might be implied here. If it is ...


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