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11

My experience in the UK and europe is that it is fairly standard for bands to share a backline, in terms of a drum kit the term "breakables" gets used quite frequently, this refers to snare bass pedal cymbals As in each band brings their own breakables and there will be a basic drum kit (bass drum, at least one rack tom, one floor tom, hi hat and 2-3 ...


10

Will approach this from the standpoint of drums, but the same advice applies to amps and other backline equipment. Communication The best way to handle this would be for the stage manager to get in touch with the owner of the drum kit and clear adjustments ahead of time. If you know who these people are ahead of time, some emails and phone calls can go a ...


10

I have had to do this with 3 of my guitars, and by far my best results have been from filling the hole with wood glue and then pushing 3 matchsticks in. Once the glue dries, I use a new screw - same width as the old one, but longer. Super glue really doesn't work on wood - you need wood glue, or wood filler.


10

Do not try to force the peg out using the string, the ball presses against the peg to lock it in place and you can damage your peg slot by forcing it. Here's how we do it at the shop: Loosen all the strings, enough to get your hand in the sound hole. If your hand is small enough, reach in the sound hole and locate the end of the pin that is broken. Grab it ...


10

For your first question. Your cymbal is oxidized, and the green color is called patina Initially, bare Cu metal atoms react with air to form the pink oxide, cuprite, Cu2O, which has Cu+1 cations. This gradually oxidizes further to the black oxide, tenorite, CuO, with Cu+2 ions. The black sulfide CuS also sometimes forms. In the presence of moisture, ...


9

Pre-cut 'violin chin rest cork' is offered from several suppliers. Yes, you just loosen, insert new cork, tighten. Glue is optional. Or you can buy sheet cork from a craft store and cut it yourself. I bought a small sheet in a rather thicker gauge some 45 years ago. It has provided a lifetime's (so far) supply of replacement corks for water keys and ...


8

I've done this repair several times to the pieces in my maraca collection. I collect the gourd maracas, but gig with synthetic or rawhide. You have two dissimilar surfaces. Close, but not the same. Regular white glue has a lot of water, and the gourd surface of the maraca will want to soak up the water in the glue. I like the yellow carpenters glue. Here ...


8

This is kind of a hack, but I have a Strat that was fixed this way more than 30 years ago... Break a wooden toothpick off in the screw hole and reinsert the screw. Do not over-tighten the screw or you'll end up back where you were.


8

Your guitar looks pristine for being 20 years old compared to my dinged up 1970 Gibson J45. Personally all the dings in the picture seem somewhat less likely to be a problem than ding #1 which makes me wonder how far that crack goes and if it extends unseen to under the bridge. The first question I think that you should ask is, "does this instrument have ...


8

Strap locks are generally designed for electric guitars, because electrics are more often heavy, and it's heavy instruments that tend to shake their straps loose. Hence, locking buttons are usually attached with a long wood screw, buried into the solid wood. Acoustics tend not to have those deep solid wooden areas. If you like to have your strap attached ...


8

It looks as though the cracking is in the lacquer only. If that's the case, then it will probably be o.k. However, if the wood itself is cracked, the sound may well be compromised, and will reflect in the fact that the guitar could only be worth 1/3 of its value, as it will need expert repair. The best way to tell is to tap the soundboard to hear if the ...


7

As Mark says, there are various products you can coat your pegs with to increase friction. Your local music shop will probably have something. In the past I have even used rosin in an emergency but it will leave dust and mess over time.


7

It really depends on where it was taken, who it was taken to, and how much needed to be done to it. If it was taken to a small, local person with little demand and all it needed was new corks / pads, it wouldn't be too much. If it was local or taken out of state to someone in high-demand / highly regarded and needed a lot of work, it could also have cost a ...


7

A trombone is the sum of its components. And the words of the economist, Thomas Sowell, "There are no solutions, only compromises..." applies to the trombone world as well. Part of why you might like the Bach are some of the things that you are trying to "fix." Similarly, part of the reason you liked the CL2000 valve may be because you also like the Conn ...


6

Is this a school band? As a band director, you should feel comfortable triaging each instrument yourself. Were I in this situation, I would go fetch my own soprano sax mouthpiece, take the instrument, and either verify it is working correctly or demonstrate the correct embouchure. Those are really the only two possibilities: either there's a major ...


6

Yes, drilling the end of each crack will stop it from spreading. As far as bent cymbals go, simply hammering it back will cause additional tonal change (an possibly cause a crack, or section to chip off). It is possible to repair the shape, but the sound will never be the same. If you have access to vice-grip or a table vice, I would recommend the ...


6

There are generally a few levels of "reconditioning" that could have been done, depending on the quality of the clarinet and how badly it had been neglected. Re-Pad - All padded keys have their pads replaced. Typically also includes cleaning and lubrication of key hinges. Some shops will also replace felt and cork key silencers and any corked key pads at ...


6

Soprano and Alto recorders are pretty cheap, relatively speaking. Honestly, it may be worthwhile to explore the possibility of purchasing new instruments. Unlike wood recorders, a plastic recorder's sound will not improve / mature over time, so if the cost of fixing them is comparable to purchasing new ones, it may be a viable alternative. Personally, if ...


6

Often when a jack socket comes loose, the owner keeps tightening it from outside. This makes the wire attached to the part of the socket which is either inside the guitar body, or under the scratchplate, to turn round. It will only go so far before it either breaks or shorts or touches another component. Sounds like you need to get at the inside part of that ...


6

This cymbal is an alloy of copper and tin. The green coulor is the a phenomene of the oxidation of copper. It can be cleaned and will disappear by a chemical reduction with hydrogenium. https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Cymbal_alloys the link of wiki says: Cymbal alloys From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [wikipedia page] Cymbals are made from four main ...


5

I would suggest music.stackexchange.com Fitting machine heads is actually incredibly easy - if you buy ones of the same type as those you already have, you will only need a screwdriver and a pair of pliers. Before going down the route of fitting new machine heads, there are two things you can look at though: Pre-stretch your strings Check your nut is ...


5

After 8 years you will not find any manufacturer guarantee, so getting a free repair for inlay damage is not going to happen. If you are not 100% confident, take it to a luthier, but this is actually a straightforward repair. Take off the strings. Carefully remove the inlay Remove the glue from underneath the inlay and from the slot it was in. You can ...


5

It all depends on the sound and whether you can live with the imperfections. My first guitar teacher had a very good Yamaha guitar that had a great big chunk of wood in the side missing. He told me that a music shop he had once worked for had an accident with it and was unable to sell it but when he graduated they thought that maybe he could use a guitar ...


5

As you can already see, the saddle is out of position (note the head of the saddle position screw is not against the bridge plate as it should be. You just need to find a replacement spring. You might find something that will work at a hardware store or at an online or brick and more music instrument retailer.


5

As Tim commented, warm water may loosen the grease, but for stuck woodwind joints we usually use a refrigerator or freezer. Chilling the plastic and/or grease can both shrink the joint and make the grease less adhesive. Recorders that don't have cork or thread wrapping in the joints shouldn't be greased to try to make tight joints fit. Greasing the plastic ...


5

Take it in and let a pro do it. How did this happen? Was it a surprise when you found it or did you knock it over and cause the split? I have a home made Les Paul (I made it) that I knocked over twice. The first time the head stock split but did not open, as a result the wood grain fit perfectly together like a jigsaw puzzle. My dad (a Luthier) and I ...


4

This should be repairable. Luckily the tension from ukulele strings is not that high, otherwise it would probably have snapped off altogether by now. You'll need a strong glue. I can't tell from your pictures whether it is the wood that has snapped, or the join between two pieces. If both halves are wood, a wood floor should be used, otherwise an epoxy, ...


4

Cut a piece of paper to fit and scotch tape it to the joint. If still loose fold the paper over. The length of the paper should be a little less than the circumference of the joint so it will stay there because the tape will be on the paper and the joint. I use this technique for all my recorders and all joints. It's completely reversable and cheap.


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