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11

Do not try to force the peg out using the string, the ball presses against the peg to lock it in place and you can damage your peg slot by forcing it. Here's how we do it at the shop: Loosen all the strings, enough to get your hand in the sound hole. If your hand is small enough, reach in the sound hole and locate the end of the pin that is broken. Grab it ...


11

For your first question. Your cymbal is oxidized, and the green color is called patina Initially, bare Cu metal atoms react with air to form the pink oxide, cuprite, Cu2O, which has Cu+1 cations. This gradually oxidizes further to the black oxide, tenorite, CuO, with Cu+2 ions. The black sulfide CuS also sometimes forms. In the presence of moisture, ...


10

I have had to do this with 3 of my guitars, and by far my best results have been from filling the hole with wood glue and then pushing 3 matchsticks in. Once the glue dries, I use a new screw - same width as the old one, but longer. Super glue really doesn't work on wood - you need wood glue, or wood filler.


9

Pre-cut 'violin chin rest cork' is offered from several suppliers. Yes, you just loosen, insert new cork, tighten. Glue is optional. Or you can buy sheet cork from a craft store and cut it yourself. I bought a small sheet in a rather thicker gauge some 45 years ago. It has provided a lifetime's (so far) supply of replacement corks for water keys and ...


8

Strap locks are generally designed for electric guitars, because electrics are more often heavy, and it's heavy instruments that tend to shake their straps loose. Hence, locking buttons are usually attached with a long wood screw, buried into the solid wood. Acoustics tend not to have those deep solid wooden areas. If you like to have your strap attached ...


8

It looks as though the cracking is in the lacquer only. If that's the case, then it will probably be o.k. However, if the wood itself is cracked, the sound may well be compromised, and will reflect in the fact that the guitar could only be worth 1/3 of its value, as it will need expert repair. The best way to tell is to tap the soundboard to hear if the ...


7

It really depends on where it was taken, who it was taken to, and how much needed to be done to it. If it was taken to a small, local person with little demand and all it needed was new corks / pads, it wouldn't be too much. If it was local or taken out of state to someone in high-demand / highly regarded and needed a lot of work, it could also have cost a ...


7

A trombone is the sum of its components. And the words of the economist, Thomas Sowell, "There are no solutions, only compromises..." applies to the trombone world as well. Part of why you might like the Bach are some of the things that you are trying to "fix." Similarly, part of the reason you liked the CL2000 valve may be because you also like the Conn ...


7

This cymbal is an alloy of copper and tin. The green coulor is the a phenomene of the oxidation of copper. It can be cleaned and will disappear by a chemical reduction with hydrogenium. https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Cymbal_alloys the link of wiki says: Cymbal alloys From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [wikipedia page] Cymbals are made from four main ...


7

If someone has previously drilled the hole larger, or swapped the screw, or even just continued to screw in a screw that was coming loose & eventually wearing the hole out… the task really just becomes "simple woodwork". At its most basic, the hole needs to be smaller so the screw will bite. You could use match sticks, cocktail sticks, chop sticks... ...


7

You would hear it Hammer click is a very distinctive sound. When heard, it leaves no doubt that there's a problem. There are a variety of videos on YouTube, for example, demonstrating hammer clicking noises. Hearing to two or three of those will make clear what to listen for. Here's one example, chosen at random. The click is quite distinct. ...


7

An addendum to leftaroundabout's answer. Never tighten the trussrod against the tension of the strings. Slacken them first. Never use the truss rod to pull the neck. Pull the neck manually & use the truss rod to take up the slack. Failing to follow these two simple rules can quite likely break the russ rod, or round off the nut, or in extreme cases ...


6

After 8 years you will not find any manufacturer guarantee, so getting a free repair for inlay damage is not going to happen. If you are not 100% confident, take it to a luthier, but this is actually a straightforward repair. Take off the strings. Carefully remove the inlay Remove the glue from underneath the inlay and from the slot it was in. You can ...


6

There are generally a few levels of "reconditioning" that could have been done, depending on the quality of the clarinet and how badly it had been neglected. Re-Pad - All padded keys have their pads replaced. Typically also includes cleaning and lubrication of key hinges. Some shops will also replace felt and cork key silencers and any corked key pads at ...


6

Soprano and Alto recorders are pretty cheap, relatively speaking. Honestly, it may be worthwhile to explore the possibility of purchasing new instruments. Unlike wood recorders, a plastic recorder's sound will not improve / mature over time, so if the cost of fixing them is comparable to purchasing new ones, it may be a viable alternative. Personally, if ...


6

Often when a jack socket comes loose, the owner keeps tightening it from outside. This makes the wire attached to the part of the socket which is either inside the guitar body, or under the scratchplate, to turn round. It will only go so far before it either breaks or shorts or touches another component. Sounds like you need to get at the inside part of that ...


6

Truss rod adjustments do not usually affect the neck with an immediate change. Depending on the base wood, it could take 30 minutes to an hour before the truss rod has had it's full effect on the neck. My recommendation would be to wait 30 minutes to an hour and check again. If you feel you have made the proper adjustments, but your guitar neck is skill ...


6

If it's anything like the archetypal polyphonic analog synthesizer (the Prophet 5), it has six analog voices (probably consisting of two oscillators, a low pass filter, and a couple envelopes each, and maybe more). Those six voices are not triggered directly by the keyboard. Instead, there's a microprocessor that allocates key presses to voices in a rotating ...


6

As Tim commented, warm water may loosen the grease, but for stuck woodwind joints we usually use a refrigerator or freezer. Chilling the plastic and/or grease can both shrink the joint and make the grease less adhesive. Recorders that don't have cork or thread wrapping in the joints shouldn't be greased to try to make tight joints fit. Greasing the plastic ...


6

It does tighten up if I turn it clockwise The truss rod doesn't seem to be broken. I don't see much of a change in the relief of the neck. It seems to be dead straight all the time. Normally the neck should be a bit concave when the truss rod is completely loose. If not, the problem has nothing to do with the truss rud but with the neck itself. The truss ...


5

The correct name for these screws are "Metric Socket Head Cap / Allen Screws (DIN 912)". Google this for your area. Here in the Uk M2 X 12 are aprox £5 per hundred. Are you sure of your dimensions as Floyd Rose being a USA company the may be using American standard threads. The following may be used. 1-72 UNF 1.854mm or 2-64 UNF 2.184mm 1-64 UNC 1.854mm ...


5

It all depends on the sound and whether you can live with the imperfections. My first guitar teacher had a very good Yamaha guitar that had a great big chunk of wood in the side missing. He told me that a music shop he had once worked for had an accident with it and was unable to sell it but when he graduated they thought that maybe he could use a guitar ...


5

As you can already see, the saddle is out of position (note the head of the saddle position screw is not against the bridge plate as it should be. You just need to find a replacement spring. You might find something that will work at a hardware store or at an online or brick and more music instrument retailer.


5

On the assumption you're taking the jack out after playing (You are, aren't you..?) then I'd go for the jack socket itself, which is switched, so as to activate the circuitry when a jack is inserted. Could be the switch isn't clearing when the jack's taken out. Might just need a bit of judicous poking around with a small screwdriver. With a multimeter, it's ...


4

Cut a piece of paper to fit and scotch tape it to the joint. If still loose fold the paper over. The length of the paper should be a little less than the circumference of the joint so it will stay there because the tape will be on the paper and the joint. I use this technique for all my recorders and all joints. It's completely reversable and cheap.


4

This should be repairable. Luckily the tension from ukulele strings is not that high, otherwise it would probably have snapped off altogether by now. You'll need a strong glue. I can't tell from your pictures whether it is the wood that has snapped, or the join between two pieces. If both halves are wood, a wood floor should be used, otherwise an epoxy, ...


4

This might help : Haynes Guitar Books I have the Stratocaster one and found it full of great info. The guitar books are intended as a bit of 'uselful humour', I guess - if you haven't heard of Haynes, they're a part of the home auto mechanic's folklore (in UK at least): Historically, from the 1960's, Haynes manuals have provided great information on how ...


4

First port of call - Paul Reed Smith. He may well have seen the problem before. It makes life easier to slacken the strings before tightening the truss rod.While they're loose, try to turn another turn, you'll feel if it's binding or the thread has gone, more easily.


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