9

The Goldberg Variations are considered infamous / demanding for a few reasons, which I will outline briefly below. Firstly, the reasons why the work is infamous: The work is a theme and variations, and to my knowledge there is only one other JS Bach piece that follow suit (see comments below). The work represents the highest model of Baroque theme and ...


8

First, “I Got Rhythm” is one of the most well known classic songs from the American Songbook which should be high on the list of tunes one should memorize. It is in a bright tempo, has a lot of harmonic movement in the A sections and a string of dominant chords going through part of the cycle of 5ths in the bridge. These elements challenge the player to ...


6

I think that every piece of music deserves the best possible method of being prepared in a such a way that both the musicians and audience have a pleasing experience. Preparation includes time, rehearsal, and every member stepping up to meet the challenge including the conductor's interpretation so that the entire group is a part of the solution. If your ...


6

When learning a new instrument, it is important to start from the beginning - even if you know the theory stuff. The reason for this is that even though you may know how to read (how is your alto clef reading?) you still need to develop the technique. Playing the "baby" material is essential for developing a proper pedagogical foundation with your new ...


5

There‘s no contra at all to simplifying a classical music piece for a beginner. it can be an approach to music and open for someone that never came into contact with classical music if he couldn't learn to play a simplified arrangement for piano e.g. Für Elise. Also easy transcriptions for brass bands can be a door opener for classical music for people who ...


5

50 - 100 times most of us probably do in a day. This is not the key to memory. It depends on a few factors, like how experienced you are, if you are looking to recall the basic pattern of the tune, or every detail. It also depends on the nature of the music, some rock like blues and "jazz" can be very open ended to improv. Prog rock perhaps less ...


4

Two answers: 1) You order to your heart's content and wallet's tolerance from The Early Music Workshop of New England, the retail shop of The Von Huene Workshop, makers of some of the very finest recorders. If you're overwhelmed by the variety of choices at that link, allow me to recommend picking up the phone and calling them when they're open, and asking ...


4

There are stories about Glenn Gould 'practicing mentally' rather than physically at the piano. Of course he had extraordinary talent and memory, and mere mortals can't do exactly as he did. But the story suggests that repeated play through might not be the only way to keep a piece of music in memory. I think some people talk about 'visualizing' performance ...


3

Not having enough time to spend with an instrument will always be challenging to improve your skills. However, as per answer above, practising away from the instrument can be done: I always practise! In the shower, walking the dog, driving, waiting for the kettle.... you get the idea. It is hard to start and takes discipline but with perseverance, it ...


3

Take a look at Duets for One (duetsforone.com) where you'll find some beautiful baroque music recorded and pdf sheet musc for you to play along with in your practise time. There are some free samples on there to try before you buy.


3

In IMSLP it is possible to select by instrument. Unfortunately the repertoire there is not overwhelming and one has to recognize the desired period(s) oneself. More of an idea, what exists, can be found at score shops like Sheet Music Plus. Good news is, that there is really a lot. In Renaissance there was no strict instrument assignment, so scores for ...


3

You'll tend to find a lot of what you're looking for in standard introduction books, such as this one. I say a lot of, not all, because while they focus on techniques of progressive difficulty, as an accomplished musician on one instrument already you may well not find them musically interesting. At least not to start with. If you want to plump for the ...


3

Chapeau to the directors you encountered. I can only speak for orchestras, but there I've seen more than once the over-ambitious director, frequently choosing pieces, which were (at least one level) too difficult. It's always a tight line to find, but the danger of musicians stumbling through a piece completely absorbing all concentration, so that none ...


3

There's another consideration to take into account with this question: while a piece may be strictly possible to play without the full 88 keys by moving it up or down an octave, it may not actually sound any good at that point. The lowest and highest octaves have very distinctive sounds about them, and notes written in those ranges are generally written ...


2

I played piano, harpsichord and organ for a very long time and picked up viola early last year. As this wasn't the first instrument,I progressed very fast throguh the method book I was using (Methode d'Alto, Henri Classens, edition Combre - it is a little old French method book. No cbildren's songs at all, but as there is no explanations on technique, you ...


2

For you in particular, I highly recommend the Suzuki books for the following reasons: It does not try to teach you how to read music It's not just generic etudes; it has has a good variety of pieces from a variety of decent composers, especially as you go further up the volumes And most importantly, you can view the full first volume here to see if you like ...


2

I have started practing Goldberg since November 2019 and now I am on Variation 11. To be honest I was not feeling Goldberg was impossible for me to learn because each variation is short and the wide variety of the variations make it so appealing to learn. It was not until lately do I find how demanding the work is. Because first of all the structure is very ...


2

Well, the technical difficulties are basically what you'll encounter with the three-part inventions or symphonies. In contrast to them, they are assembled into a musical whole rather than an educational one. The typical pianist rather rarely is confronted with the wish to make a performance from all three-part inventions. The Goldberg variations were ...


2

Yes, it will restrict your repertoire. I have a 61 key synth, and there are occasions when I have to adapt a piece 'to fit'. Not very many songs, mind. It doesn't make me regret buying it 20 years ago. There is a dedicated transpose key that I can configure from -24 to +24, so the theoretical range is greater than 88 keys, however, despite it being very ...


2

That tune, and those changes, contain two specific progressions that are common in all Western music. To be fair those changes existed probably 100s of years before that tune and the popularity of the tune made them forever associated with it! The two progressions are (1) the I --> vi --> ii --> V7, which is almost identical to I --> vi --> IV --> V and ...


2

Beethoven 5 is tricky for conductors in the first handful of bars (the very famous bit). It's because of the abrupt pauses combined with the fact that the big 4 note motto starts each time on an offbeat, after a quaver rest. Also, it's in a quick 2/4. They must decide to conduct in a quick 2 or slower 1. That's a lot to handle for an inexperienced ...


2

Beethoven 5 presents no problems to a 'commercial' conductor who is happy to give a clear 'and ONE' in front of 'Da Da Da Daa..' The classical guys sometimes feel it's infra dig to 'count in', and tie themselves up in knots. There's a similar situation at the opening of Mozart's Magic Flute overture. You can give two clear preparatory beats to the ...


2

I can’t give you a better answer as far as how to "build a big repertoire" with memorization goes, but a couple other considerations around "how not to forget songs" are situational comfort and context. I’ve learned from experience that it’s difficult to remember things in an unfamiliar situation, especially if I'm nervous. And some times ...


2

Actually memorising a whole song, especially when one is fairly new to music, isn't easy. You are effectively in unfamiliar territory. After playing many songs, patterns should emerge, which keep recurring. Like when in key C, there's lots of Fs and Gs, and sometimes Am. Like when in key C, the notes played most are from that scale - and you don't play F♯ ...


1

Two reasons: Those chord changes have been adapted by jazz musicians as the harmonic basis for other songs. The chord progressions are common in tonal music. The basic patterns involve roots by descending fifth. ii7 V7 I in the first part and a chain of secondary dominants V7/vi V7/ii V7/V V7 in the second part. Both are common progressions in tonal ...


1

It would make sense for beginning concert band conductors to be started on Grade 0.5-1.5 concert band pieces. I've found that those pieces tend to have dirt-common time signatures (4/4, 3/4, 2/4, maybe 6/8), constant and relatively moderate tempos, and conservative key signatures (invariably Bb major, G minor, Eb major, C minor, F major, or D minor--note ...


1

Baroque and earlier music are easy to read (sometimes not) but helluva hard to perform as the way it was intended. The majority of information needed for a good performance isn't written in original sheet music - as the pro baroque player was well versed in music, most of information and customs weren't written because it was redundant - so usually you need ...


1

If you want pieces from the "classical period proper," then Mozart and Haydn are the main ones. If you want to stretch a point, then include Beethoven up through Op. 22 or perhaps Op. 49. If you want to further stretch a point, then include Beethoven up through Op. 90, and some of Schubert's earlier works. Of course, there are plenty of other composers of ...


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