51

If you look closely at the picture, you'll notice that pieces of tape are placed in very specific positions: one in the middle of speaker cone and the second one on the edge of speaker cone. Furthermore, look at where microphone is positioned - it directly aims the piece of tape. This technique is commonly used in recording - tape is used to mark microphone ...


19

Because of dynamics called room modes. Room modes are the collection of resonances that exist in a room when the room is excited by an acoustic source such as a loudspeaker. (...) each frequency being related to one or more of the room's dimension's or a divisor thereof. To keep things simple, we will assume the room has 6 parallel walls (right prism or ...


12

Sadly I think this may be a duplicate of the question Altering the sound of a guitar to match a sitar. But before this question is closed as a duplicate I want to nip in with an answer I just got over email from Helmut Most people think that the sound is created by the sympathetic strings, but it isn't. It's the bridge, a wide, slightly curved piece ...


10

JCPedroza's answer is correct for a square room, but I think it's worth pointing out that the shape of the room is not just it's dimensions. For example, a square room with an open window will act different than if the window is shut. In acoustics, we often model the response of a room as a circuit. If you break up the space into pieces, each piece can be ...


8

We call this sympathetic resonance and it happens when two strings are related via harmonics. This is made especially obvious when we consider the harmonic series: Begin by pushing down the G right above middle C without having it sound. Then put down the sustain pedal and play middle C; you may hear an upper pitch, which we'll talk about soon. Now try ...


6

Open strings always sound different to fretted notes - more resonant and with more sustain. Players of string instruments learn to avoid open strings for that reason, and sometimes to take advantage of the different tone of an open string. Other than that, it does seem that you've identified a resonant frequency in the body of your guitar. That is probably ...


6

I would advise against doing so. I expect that you intend to exchange both heads of your drum, to save some money. I've done that, once or twice, because I had to (very bad dent on the batter head, no spare available, and I had to play). First, it supposes that you use the same model head on both sides of you toms, which is often seen but in no way a ...


6

I'm not sure if it's a correct board to post this question, but anyway... "Mud" usually refers to too much low frequencies and/or too scarce high frequencies. You should correct it per instrument + sometimes in whole mix with equalizer. Resonances are hums on certain frequencies than can be caused by different reasons. For example when you record acoustic ...


5

To a reasonable approximation the overtones of the vibrating strings used in musical instruments are integer multiples of the fundamental. In a tablular format similar to the OP: 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 ... These correspond to the string modes: The relative amplitudes of the degree to which these modes are excited depends on the details of how the string is ...


5

I would strongly advise against it. The resonant head is supposed to resonate. If you have beaten your batter head to a point where it should be changed as a batter head, it really means it should be changed. It's beyond the point of optimal resonance and thus using it as a resonant head will not produce a good sound. Batter and resonant heads don't ...


5

Based on what you've given us to go on, the instrument with the resonant frequency of this cave you visit would be an identical cave. :-) Before you start thinking about instruments, materials, or tuning, you need some ballpark as to what this resonant frequency actually is. The most reliable way to determine this would be to bring a tone generator (like a ...


5

Your basic problem is that you have a sound source in one corner of what looks like a box-shaped room. That in itself will boost the sound output at low frequencies, by reflecting the sound coming from the back of the instrument into the room. If the organ amplifier has some type of "tone control" or "equalizer," simply reducing the bass response may fix ...


4

The answers to both of these questions depends strongly on context. Obviously, any single note played in isolation won't sound functionally different from any other note played in isolation, so in order to give it functional meaning (as a 2nd or 5th or what have you) you need to play it in the context of a key. Consider that we're in the key of C major. The ...


4

They don't usually put that tape, the sound engineer does, and he probably did at their last gig. Because the engineer microphoned the amp. Yes, they feed the actual sound the cones make into the mixer. And that tape marked the spot where the microphone was supposed to be pointed at to get a better (and hopefully feedback-free) sound. Why do they ...


4

Imagine how much worse the problem is on acoustic guitars, where the body resonates with the string and makes the resonances of the other strings that much louder! This is the result of physical forces acting inside the guitar, and every guitar is subject to the same physical processes, so your guitar is not broken or anything like that. The fix is ...


3

You need to understand that a "clean sine wave" has no higher harmonics at all. A periodic signal (i.e., one with a clearly defined pitch) is generally a superposition of sine waves with frequencies that are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency of the signal. I.e., if you play an A at 440 Hz you will have harmonics at 2x440=880 Hz, 3x440=1320 Hz, ...


3

I agree with Tim, although playing around with the resonance can definitely be fun! Vocal resonance is the result of the shaping of the throat and mouth, something known as the first and second formant tunings (but I wouldn't worry about the terms just yet). In order to find great resonance you must be able to freely adjust the vowel sounds created by your ...


3

The thing you haven't really taken into account is that all instruments (including metal bars) have a range of frequencies, not just one, and you may have a range of resonant frequencies in the cave itself, so you will need to think about what tone you are intending to get. For example you may use an instrument that happens to have a harmonic at a resonant ...


3

This phenomenon is called sympathetic resonance. There's nothing wrong with your instrument, in fact it's probably a sign that your instrument is in good working order! What's happening is that the when you play the A on the E string, your instrument & the air around it is vibrating at that frequency (among others, but for the the purposes of this ...


3

Adding to @David Bowling's comment, quote: Sympathetic vibrations: when you play the fretted A, the instrument vibrates with frequencies that of course induce vibrations in the other strings. Each string has natural resonances at the fundamental, first octave, fifth above that, fourth above that, and so on. These correspond to vibrational nodes (...


3

Mud is almost always around 250 Hz. Widely it might be anywhere between 100 Hz and 500 Hz, but usually there's good content between 90 - 150 Hz and 300 - 600 Hz. For some reason, 250 Hz is one of the only magic frequencies where cutting it a little bit tends to clean up the sound on almost every mix. Finding resonance is different, and usually each ...


2

I'm guessing it's an acoustic with a round hole. A small piece of pipe lagging (sponge) stuck inside the guitar, under the bridge or surrounding area - you may have to experiment - with gaffer or duct tape, could solve this annoying problem, which may also show itself on the E string, as that is a harmonic of A, or the D string, which has A as its harmonic....


2

Acoustic guitars have approximately the same range as male vocals. So the notes that it 'heard' were within the sound range it was produced to amplify and project.Had it been an acoustic bass, for example, the resonance would have been less. Bathrooms have a similar property, but usually have a particular frequency that gets amplified. On the guitar, there ...


2

In fact, the whole of Sitar brings up that sound! Seven main components that contribute to the quality of the sound can be identified as follows. To note, there are two bridges, not one, and there are three classes of strings, not two! (1) Ghodi (the primary bridge): its curves and finish (2) Tumbaa (Pumpkin shells as Resonators): a second resonator at ...


2

So let us say we only have the two open ends, and the hole you blow into (e.g. no tone holes). My first question is: What frequency would resonate based on the length of the instrument (also disregarding end correction for now)? I believe this would behave as a regular tube open at both ends, but unable to resonate the fundamental, or in fact any odd ...


2

Whether it actually is or not I have to say it really does sound like fret buzz to me! Listening to your clean recording I notice in looking at the waveforms produced when looking at the accompanying graphic on soundcloud, that it seems to occur more when you strike the string slightly harder, and as you know will know from experience when the string is ...


2

I think @Todd's comment is right. This sounds a lot to me like the symptom I have on my twin neck SG. Whatever I play I get the same nasty squeak/ringing noise. I researched it, and found wolf tones on acoustic instruments - especially cellos so thought I'd do some checking. It turns out the structure of the bridge and tail seemed to encourage resonance at ...


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