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52 votes
Accepted

Why do guitarists put tape on their amplifiers?

If you look closely at the picture, you'll notice that pieces of tape are placed in very specific positions: one in the middle of speaker cone and the second one on the edge of speaker cone. ...
el.pescado - нет войне's user avatar
19 votes
Accepted

Does the lip really vibrate at the same frequency of a brass instrument?

At least for trumpet, yes, the lips really vibrate that quickly. For a high trumpet note, the lips may vibrate at more than 1000 vibrations per second. This is fast, but remember that the muscles are ...
Aaron's user avatar
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18 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

Previous answers have already elaborated how mechanical means can improve the efficiency of sound transfer from source to ears (or transfer from vibration to sound). From deflectors, to horns to sound ...
Kris Van Bael's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Electric guitar is making a vibrating noise on hammer on

You play an E note hammering to F♯. When you play E on the G string, it makes the low E string vibrate in sympathy. That continues to vibrate and while the F♯ is sounding, it sets up beats with that ...
Tim's user avatar
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9 votes
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What is required in a hollow "tube" to resonate?

user65726's answer has some of the basics, but to expand on that a bit: The question asks for two things, which do not necessarily always come together: "musical stable pitches" and "harmonics." ...
Athanasius's user avatar
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9 votes

Does it matter if a digital piano has a large cabinet?

Not really. Most of the resonance in a digital piano is "faked" - that doesn't mean it can't be good, just that it doesn't rely on actual cabinet resonance to make it sound "real". ...
Tetsujin's user avatar
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9 votes

Does it matter if a digital piano has a large cabinet?

I'm going to post a counter-opinion and say it does matter. Not because that fake structure makes any difference to the sound of the piano - it doesn't. But... We do not need it to be mobile I'm not ...
Graham's user avatar
  • 4,802
9 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

According to the law of conservation of energy you can't amplify sound without an energy input. What you can do is concentrate the sound locally in one direction using a megaphone at the cost of ...
PiedPiper's user avatar
  • 21.4k
8 votes
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When playing high notes on piano (above F6) lower notes can be heard. Why is this?

We call this sympathetic resonance and it happens when two strings are related via harmonics. This is made especially obvious when we consider the harmonic series: Begin by pushing down the G right ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.7k
8 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

Adding on PiedPiper's answer, energy must be conserved. Acoustic "amplification" is, as already stated, focusing the energy in one direction but also (the point of this answer) to do ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 5,097
8 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

Does natural amplification TRULY exist...? If we replace the word "natural" (since it's not clear what that means in this context) with "non-electrical", then the answer is ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
  • 57.1k
7 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

As the other stated, you can't make energy out of nothing. In addition to the two mechanisms you listed (focusing the sound towards the listener and adding reverberation), I would add one more: ...
user1079505's user avatar
6 votes

How to identify mud and resonance in a mix

I'm not sure if it's a correct board to post this question, but anyway... "Mud" usually refers to too much low frequencies and/or too scarce high frequencies. You should correct it per instrument + ...
Wookie88's user avatar
  • 359
6 votes

Does it matter if a digital piano has a large cabinet?

If the space is just a void, then as per Tetsujin's answer, there's unlikely to be a major benefit to it. However, some pianos with the same form-factor as a small upright piano will have speaker ...
Нет войне's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

violin other string vibrates loudly when playing another string

You are describing resonance, which is one of the ways that violinists know a note is in tune. It is usually a good thing, in that the instrument is telling you that the note is in tune (!). Some ...
xxfelixxx's user avatar
  • 476
5 votes

Why do guitarists put tape on their amplifiers?

They don't usually put that tape, the sound engineer does, and he probably did at their last gig. Because the engineer microphoned the amp. Yes, they feed the actual sound the cones make into the ...
ZJR's user avatar
  • 207
5 votes
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What are the most common overtones of a vibrating string?

To a reasonable approximation the overtones of the vibrating strings used in musical instruments are integer multiples of the fundamental. In a tablular format similar to the OP: 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 ....
Dave's user avatar
  • 17.8k
5 votes

Digital home organ bass resonance

Your basic problem is that you have a sound source in one corner of what looks like a box-shaped room. That in itself will boost the sound output at low frequencies, by reflecting the sound coming ...
guest's user avatar
  • 51
5 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

On the basic assumption that 'amplification' means making a sound louder, then, no, a sound doesn't need to be turned into an electrical signal first. What's needed is an 'acoustic amplifier'. ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k
5 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

The term "amplification" in acoustic context is ambiguous and often misleading. While it is widely used and accepted, it's not correct: you can use it, but with awareness. You are having ...
musicamante's user avatar
  • 6,851
4 votes
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Striking open B & E (high) strings causes newly purchased classical guitar to resonate, flaw?

Well, you have just rediscovered sympathy! When plucking an E, any string which have an E as an harmonic not too far away (the low E and the A strings especially) will also resonate. As you do not ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 5,097
4 votes
Accepted

Doubt about Harp Sound

Having thought about this some more, I've decided to rewrite my answer... Your doubts about the acoustic properties of the harp are understandable. When heard in an orchestral setting, the harp is ...
Bob Broadley's user avatar
  • 21.4k
4 votes

Resonance in electric guitar

Imagine how much worse the problem is on acoustic guitars, where the body resonates with the string and makes the resonances of the other strings that much louder! This is the result of physical ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
  • 57.1k
4 votes

Does natural amplification TRULY exist in acoustics or does it have to be turned into an electrical signal first?

Most string instruments include a natural amplifier. As one example, the sound-board of a piano amplifies the sound of the string, which would be quite soft otherwise.
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.1k
3 votes

Why does the open string oscillate when I play its corresponding fretted note on another string?

Adding to @David Bowling's comment, quote: Sympathetic vibrations: when you play the fretted A, the instrument vibrates with frequencies that of course induce vibrations in the other strings. ...
Carl Witthoft's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why does the open string oscillate when I play its corresponding fretted note on another string?

This phenomenon is called sympathetic resonance. There's nothing wrong with your instrument, in fact it's probably a sign that your instrument is in good working order! What's happening is that the ...
Dean Ransevycz's user avatar
3 votes

Why does signal clipping create more resonance in the upper harmonics

You need to understand that a "clean sine wave" has no higher harmonics at all. A periodic signal (i.e., one with a clearly defined pitch) is generally a superposition of sine waves with frequencies ...
Matt L.'s user avatar
  • 20.1k

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