39 votes
Accepted

Notation - when to use staccato vs rests

I endorse Aaron's and Richard's answers, regarding what staccato means conceptually. This answer is mostly to provide some examples and details as to how staccato will typically come out in the case ...
leftaroundabout's user avatar
39 votes

What is this violin ornament?

It's not an ornament; it's a quarter rest. The Violins I are divided, and the upper half play rest + quarter note while the lower half play half notes.
Kilian Foth's user avatar
  • 7,563
37 votes

Fermata over a rest at the end of the piece?

Do you sit there and prevent the audience from clapping until you want that rest to finish its extended duration? I've always thought this is pretty much what a fermata like this is about. When ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
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25 votes
Accepted

Difference between half note and quarternote with quarter rest

You can answer this easily by asking simply, "What is the difference between a note and a rest?" One is sound; the other is silence. note = sound rest = silence Therefore, whereas you will ...
Neal's user avatar
  • 3,432
24 votes
Accepted

A big "1" in the middle of a piano grand staff

They indicate one measure of rest. In this context they are redundant. More typically you might see larger numbers denoting 8 or 27 or 132 measures of rest in, say, an instrumental part from an ...
Aaron's user avatar
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22 votes

Notation - when to use staccato vs rests

The core difference is that eighth notes/rests and quarter notes/rests (etc.) are durations; whereas, staccato marks are articulations. While it's true that staccato affects the duration of the note, ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
20 votes

What is the meaning of this notation that looks like a rest superimposed on a note?

It's a misprint. Both are 16th-note As, and the rests are misplaced. The rests should be placed lower on the page, level with the stems-down eighth note chords. They represent a separate "voice&...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
17 votes

How do you not get lost between measures?

A few ways: By counting the measures! It really is that simple. You start on measure 28, so measure 29 is your first measure of rest, then measure 30, then measure 31, etc. By the time measures 38 ...
Richard's user avatar
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15 votes
Accepted

Reinforcing meter when dealing with alternating 1/8 and 1/16 notes and rests

In fact, you can beam rests! I would go with: This is a clear modification of the "correct" beaming of your original example, which would be: Some of the comments below correctly state that beat 3 ...
Richard's user avatar
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12 votes

Rest above a note in a piano piece

First, it's 3/4: a crotchet note counts for 1 beat, a quaver counts for 1/2 beat and a minim counts for 2 beats; the bar contains 3 beats in total. Second, there are 3 voices in this bar: 2 voices for ...
lovebach655's user avatar
12 votes

Rests in pickup measure (anacrusis)

The lower version is right, definitely. You write the pickup measure with the actual note durations, not like "read all staves and try to figure out if this is a pickup bar or not". Think about if ...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar
11 votes

What does this symbol mean?

That's an eighth note (quaver) rest. If you know how to play the quarter note (crotchet) rest in the previous measure, then it's the same thing, just half as long. I suggest you bookmark the ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
  • 56.8k
11 votes

Is a rest required at the end of the final measure of a piece?

Yes, you do. Every measure has to be completely 'filled'. If your last measure isn't followed by a repeat sign, a dal segno or dal capo, and your last note(s) don't make up for a full measure you ...
Tim H's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

How do you come in at the right moment in a memorized performance?

I both memorize the accompaniment and know my "cues" and count. Ideally one would have the whole piece in one's head and just know/feel when to come in, but with the typical amount of rehearsal time ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
  • 56.8k
11 votes

Thick line with a number on top

It denotes multi-bar rests. The number above the bar is the number of bars that are filled with whole rests. It's done this way to be easier to read (you don't have to be looking at the page for ...
Jacob Swanson's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Full bar rest at the end of piece

Analysis The idea that the piece is in ternary form comprising three eight-measure phrases is correct. It just needs to be taken further. First, note that if one counts from the anacruses to the notes ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
10 votes

Fermata over Rest

I'd read that as the composer wanted you to really make that pause important. So take your time with it, especially if it's in between two very different feeling parts of the piece. (Fast to Slow ...
Zessa's user avatar
  • 201
10 votes
Accepted

Fermata over Rest

There's no specified extra length for a fermata, so it will depend on the mood of the piece (and that of the performer!), and that can vary from performance to performance.10-20% longer would be about ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k
10 votes
Accepted

How to conduct a fermata over a rest?

Wrap up the previous note. Do nothing for a suitable amount of time (but don't drop your hands. Keep the orchestra's attention). Give an upbeat into the continuation.
Laurence's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

Rests in 10/16 time

NOTE: See bottom of post for edit in light of new information since the original answer There are two sets of pulses involved here: the "small" pulses -- in groups of 3 or 2 -- and the "...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
9 votes

Notation - when to use staccato vs rests

I'll chime in as a violinist. Keep in mind that notation is partly about psychologically manipulating the musicians to produce the effect that you have in mind. The first example would be appropriate ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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9 votes
Accepted

Can you use a dotted semibreve rest in 3/2 time?

A Whole Bar rest which fills a bar in any (with a few extreme exceptions) time signature looks like a semibreve rest, but is centred in the bar. It's the standard notation. It is arguable that a ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 92.9k
9 votes

A big "1" in the middle of a piano grand staff

The big bold number 1's are indicating the number of whole bar rests. They aren't particularly useful for just 1 bar, but if it was a larger number, the additional bars wouldn't have to be written out ...
Elements In Space's user avatar
8 votes

In 3/2 time why is a whole-note rest used as a bar's rest when a whole note doesn't fill the measure?

The questioner is mistaken. A whole NOTE cannot be used to fill a bar of any length. But a whole bar can be filled by a REST that looks very like a whole note rest. The whole bar rest and the whole ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 92.9k
8 votes

Counting long rests in music

Listening for cue parts in specifically the Bolero is difficult, because of many repetitions and subtle changes, so I fully understand your difficulty, and I too get lost most of the times I listen to ...
hlynbech's user avatar
  • 231
8 votes

Rests in pickup measure (anacrusis)

Actual note duration for the rest. What should happen at the other end of the piece is a part bar containing the two 'missing' beats - often as rests - but increasingly forgotten, sadly. So if there ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k

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