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20

Reverb is actually the effect of playing in confined, walled spaces - the sound bounces off the walls giving a diffused sort of echo. In a wide open space there is zero reverb. (The original, now edited, question said 'wide, open spaces.) I've never heard 'drippy'. But 'wet' and 'dry' are common terms when applying effects. The 'dry' signal is the ...


10

I refer you to Wikipedia. The motion of sound can be hard to understand because we can't see its propagation. We can sometimes understand it more easily by analogy to waves we can see, for example waves on the surface of water, or light waves from a light bulb. Although they are different kinds of waves (sound waves are longitudinal whereas water and ...


9

What is stereo reverb "Stereo reverb" may mean different things: mono in, stereo out stereo in, stereo out The latter category is further split between "true stereo" and "dual mono" categories, and maybe something in between. In dual mono the left and right inputs have completely independent and separate processing, and sound doesn't "leak" between the ...


7

1) The quantity of sound waves produced in air depends on the intensity or amplitude. If you pull your guitar string back a very short distance from its normal resting position, then the oscillations in air particles will be small, and they won't bang against your ear drum as hard. This produces a quieter-sounding noise. The frequency 440 Hz is how many ...


7

In American restaurant vernacular, a food item without any added condiment [e.g. toast without butter] is "dry". If effects like reverb are viewed as audio condiments, sound without such effects would likewise be "dry". The audio term "wet" is a back-formation from the common use of "wet" as an antonym for the primary meaning of "dry". While buttered ...


7

Just about everything sounds better with some reverb on it. For steel strings you can get magnetic pickups that require no power to function. For nylon strings you can get a piezo pickup but the output will be very low compared to magnetic pickups unless you have a preamp or other signal boost on it. For other instruments, just about anything that vibrates ...


7

Two possible reasons spring to mind. I'm assuming your regular amp setup will be summing the reverb to mono. Some stereo reverbs create phase-discrepancies which appear to push the stereo field wider, which leads to these possibilities... headphones introduce a very artificial stereo field, where the sound sources are 180˚ from each other, with no cross-...


6

One old technique for this is to copy the track or tracks, invert the phase on each and apply a high ratio compressor to the inverted track. When you mix the treated tracks with the originals, the parts that were left by the compressor will cancel out. See De-Verb for Free: Removing Reverb using Free Plugins for a fairly good explanation of this technique. ...


6

Drippy is sometimes used specifically to refer to the reverb effect in vintage Fender amplifiers. These were spring reverb circuits, driven by something like a 12at7 tube. The characteristic 'drip' effect was used a lot in surf music. The player would pick short, staccato notes using palm muting. Each note in turn would be routed through the spring reverb ...


5

It's hard to discuss music or sound with words, so often we resort to metaphor. Never heard "drippy" but "dry/wet" is a typical label for the knob which is used to alter the mix of reverb ("wet") and un-reverb ("dry"). It has nothing to do with the actual presence of water (unless you use a swimming pool as a reverb chamber).


5

My method of dealing with problem rooms was to bring along a real time analyzer and test for the room resonant peaks and equalize the room with my graphic eq. The bass and lower mid-range tones are heftier and will reflect much more uncontrollably than the higher tones which can cancel themselves just by reflecting once. Placement of the speakers up high ...


4

You hear virtual digital and convolution reverbs all the time. They sound good enough that tracks and albums that use them go multi-platinum and win Grammy awards every year. Modern sound design for film and TV relies on convolution reverbs to create convincing spaces, especially when dialog is replaced. That's why ADR sounds so much better now than it did ...


4

A stereophonic signal gives you a much better starting base since there is a simple correlation between the initial wave fronts and more information about the room transfer function. There are ways of removing the less phase-consistent elements you get in the reverb. However, the better you do this kind of reverb-removal, the more artifacts you get in the ...


4

In other words, if i pluck an A string on a guitar with the A being 440hz, that means that single pluck has ejected 440 sound waves into the space which are now reflecting off surfaces? No. The string will start generating sound waves at a rate of 440/second. How many waves it will generate, depends on how long you allow the string to vibrate. If you don't ...


3

From what I've read on reverbs, "dry" is the sound recorded directly from the source. "Wet" is the term for sound which has been reflected from the walls.


3

As Laurence says, adding reverb is more generally done at the mixing desk. The problem is that you (on stage) can't hear what sounds good for an audience. It may sound great to you, but awful out front, which is why performers have foldback speakers (also known as monitors) with a different mix. One reason things sound better with reverb is that you can't ...


3

When speaking in terms of reverb, how long do early reflections take to occur/become audible after the direct sound? in addition to the other answers, this also depends on the decay time of the original sound. A long decay time means the direct sound can be louder than the early reflections. E.g. a single clap will generate audible reflections sooner than ...


2

You can't. What you CAN do is get closer to the source, so that direct sound dominates reflected sound. Maybe a 'silent disco' approach, where no sound goes into the room at all, everyone uses radio headphones! This is an ever-present problem in churches. The usual solution is to use a PA system with LOTS of small speakers, so that everyone has a speaker ...


2

In my book, 'real' reverb is when musicians are recorded, almost certainly all at once, in a concert hall or other space. They aren't close-miced, a stereo pair is placed so as to capture the whole thing, instruments and room. (In modern practice, there will probably be some spot-micing as well as the main stereo pair. But the reverb comes from the room, ...


2

You can put a pickup on a ukulele if you want, and run it through all the effects a guitarist might use. A multi-effects setup will often include one or more pedals for volume and wah-wah. A single effect box normally uses an internal battery, with the option of an external power supply. More typically, a uke is just miced and put through the PA. Maybe ...


2

If what you’re doing works fine for your particular situation, keep doing it. However your iPhone mic will be picking up all sorts of other sounds from your environment and applying the onboard effects to those sounds as well. Your current solution will let you down badly as soon as you want to perform with other people, or if you were playing through ...


2

Beacause the sound is evocative of, what we stereotypically think of as, the sound of water dripping into a pool of water, .


2

It will all depend on the size and shape of the room, and where the sound source and listener/microphone are located in the room. Sound travels in all directions and reflects off of most surfaces, so the width, length, and height of the room all matter. Sound travels at approximately 1 foot per millisecond, so with a little math you can calculate the delay ...


1

Realistically, it may be 10 to 20 ms in a small room, and perhaps about 50 in a hall. (As has been said, it depends on several environmental factors.) If you're wanting to enchance a recorded instrument it'll be quite long--you'd want 50 and even up to 100, depending on the instrument and the sound effect you want. If it's too short, you won't be able to ...


1

It's not clear to me whether or not you understand the difference between the two but since you're asking "when" and "for what purpose" here are a couple of use-cases: stereo: you have a mono sound source (let's say a tambourine recorded with one mono mic) panned to one side. You could send that to a stereo room reverb (post-fader but pre-pan) to create the ...


1

It is very hard to find good sources, but I think that the term "wet" came about from the fact that wet walls increase reverberation and there are some civil engineering books which speak about this as it relates to music halls. Dry then becomes sound with less reverberation. Architects should be aware also of the acoustic effects which dampness of ...


1

Before you ask this question, you need to ask whether you are helping things by being amplified in the first place. After all, most halls already have reverb that occurs naturally - the electronics is a simulation of that. Why add a simulated version of something that is already there? It depends hugely on context - style of music, the venue, the acoustics, ...


1

If all you want is reverb and you're just playing at home, try a different room or facing the wall. Try the bathroom or entry hall.


1

I get the 'no budget' thing. I've worked with schools, churches and other organizations without a proper sound system and have been able to get some good basic mixes. Similarly, there might be some relatively easy fixes for these issues. Some of the 'popping' sounds might be removed by simply buying new cables for your microphones and speakers and checking ...


1

Maybe "natural reverb" vs "digitally added reverb" is a better way of formulating it, to avoid people digressing over "what's real" ? I suppose one of the advantages of using natural reverb is simply logistics: it's simply practical for a situation like a choir where the choir master for example can try out different dispositions of people in the room until ...


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