Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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6

By crikey this is broad. You've basically asked "What's the difference between 'white' music & 'black' music?" Because you could write entire books on the subject & still not arrive at any real definition, especially in this day & age when everybody's borrowed from everybody else to such a degree as it's almost impossible to disentangle any more,...


4

It's syncopated, but really there is so much to this topic. One of the earliest practitioner (that we have recorded) of this was, and the most famous, was Louis Armstrong on his many early recordings. It's really one of the main reasons that he was so revolutionary (and he was - in contrast to his later rather cabaret image, he had a reputation in the 30's ...


3

The length of a beat depends on tempo, and tempo depends on the style and feeling that's wanted. Or the other way around - whatever beat length you set, it sets a tempo and a feeling. If your beat is one second long, then you get 60 of them per minute, and the tempo is 60 beats per minute. Try different tempos and see what you like.


3

At 120 BPM (beats per minute), which is a typical pop song tempo, every beat lasts half a second. Divide 60 by the BPM to get the length of a beat at other tempos. You can use the Google metronome to try out tempos expressed in BPM. if I understand your explanation correctly, you can set the timing of the notes and rests in tenths of a second. This is the ...


3

Requests for resources are supposed to be off topic, so you got some downvotes. Nevertheless, this is one of my favorite cheat sheet(s) https://tobyrush.com/theorypages/en-uk/index.html


1

There are several posters available that show the most important information for beginners like these: https://www.adsrsounds.com/music-theory-tutorials/music-theory-cheat-sheet/ https://www.pinterest.ch/pin/592504894698030594/ and surely many others! Print them out and oin them on the wall ahead of you computer or use it as cover or protection envelope ...


1

It works because it advances or resolves the melody faster than expected/needed, which is exciting! A lot of the pleasure we derive from music is from pattern recognition at first to learn the general structure, but also by being pleasantly surprised by creative deviations from that structure. Besides "pushing the chord," I've also heard this referred to "...


1

There is a close relation between music and physical movement, especially between rhythm and dance. This seems obvious and scientific research suggests that for humans it is a natural thing. (Search internet for something like "music and children" and, in any case, read Musicophilia by Oliver Sachs). I think it is key to understanding what makes your "push ...


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"Why does it work" - the more general phenomenon behind it is syncopation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syncopation Syncopation means playing something off-beat, and in order for that to work for you, you have to have a strong sense of on-beat. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(music)#On-beat_and_off-beat How to make it easier to play? By developing ...


1

Anticipation. We expect the first beat of a lot of bars in pieces to be the strongest - that's often how we determine how many beats are in the bar anyway! So we expect a chord change on the first beat of a bar, but with push chords, they come earlier than expected. It sort of moves the song on, sooner than it would if the chord changed on the next bar. It ...


1

Isn't this called back phrasing? Back phrasing: A stylistic technique where the singer is either ahead or behind the beat, on purpose. Jazz singers typically use this technique, as do some pop singers. https://www.successfulsinging.com/singing-guides/glossary-of-singing-terms/ I think already Brahms wrote this in the ...


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