Hot answers tagged

40

I can't understand very well note duration notation. No wonder. The music you're trying to read is objectively incorrect in several ways. I won't list them all, but as you've noticed the vertical alignment is out of order. Furthermore, the rhythmic notation does not comply with the meter. Follow the advice in the comments to get a different copy. I ...


25

Minor nitpick: in your first example, the semiquaver should precede the minim. That will improve readability: Major nitpick: The two rhythms are identical. A crotchet triplet can be subdivided into 12 semiquavers. We're dividing two beats into 12 equally-sized divisions. The first example splits them into a group of 3 and a group of 9; that is, 1/4 (3/12) ...


24

I don't know what keyboard that is, but that looks like the control for the ABC [Auto Bass Chord] system [That's a Yamaha term, other manufacturers may call it something else, but they all do a similar job]. Basically, it's a chord recognition mode. When set to Normal, the ABC system is off. Whatever notes you play, that's what you will hear. Fingered ...


19

While playing by yourself, you do what you want. In time, out of time, seems no-one cares! The potential problems will come when you play with others. I've played with many like you appear to be, and it's not hard work - it's almost impossible! So, the decision will be yours. If you only ever want to play alone, probably for your own amusement, then take no ...


19

There are several rhythms that use the 3-3-2-2-2 pulse in flamenco music from Spain. One of the most well known is Bulerías, a seemingly simple but very complex sounding rhythm made even more complex by the fact that they count starting on 12 instead of 1 So the basic accents fall on: 12..3..6.8.10. An often used variation is: 12..3....78.10. This gives the ...


17

There's two things going on here that may be a bit confusing. There are cross-stave notes, like you already noted. The rhythm is a so called 'tresillo' rhythm, that's often used in latin-american music. Here the rhythm is structured as 3+3+2 in eighth notes. The note groupings and accents reflect this rhythm. That's why it can seem a bit awkward to read ...


17

The following are the exact same rhythms you posted, but each one is divided into smaller values and they are placed on top of each other to make the comparison easier. As you can easily see, the two notes you said don't fall at the same beat. They are slightly off. This is because in the case of the triplets, you divide the beat by 3 (and play the first ...


17

The answer will be 'yes' for any definition of arrhythmic, as there are no rules about what music can and can't do - but it's probably still worth noting that it's not totally clear what 'arrhythmic' means without being more specific about the definition. Only a limited number of music styles are based on an entirely regular meter, with most styles allowing (...


15

This is an example of hemiola From the Oxford Companion to Music (2nd ed., Alison Latham, 2002) Hemiola: In modern notation, a hemiola occurs when two bars in triple meter (e.g., 3/2) are performed as if they were notated as three bars in duple meter (6/4) and vice versa. The Wikipedia entry linked above goes on to say that when the 3:2 ratio occurs ...


14

This writing is really very odd. But you can derive the correct rhythm if you imagine the eighth notes as off beat (counting “and”) ... there’s no logic in the notation of the half notes. Imagine you have a 4 voice part written on 4 different layers and channels. But it will still be difficult to derive a reasonable rhythm. It will be much easier to compare ...


13

Different time signatures can be used to simplify the notation, but I would argue that that's not the case in this example, which strikes me as a pretty clear 4/4 assuming an average tempo. Rather, I think it's just that the notation of this example isn't ideal. While it may be exact in terms of note lengths, a more standard notation would be something like: ...


13

Based on my experience reading and playing many Latin styles over the years, write it in 4/4. There really should be no special accommodation for 3-3-2 rhythms in this piece and in general, Latin music. This piece does not always use the 3-3-2 rhythmic grouping. Both hands play rhythms and patterns at times that are 100% 4/4. If you write it in 3-3-2, the ...


13

I recommend a three-stage process for examples like this one: First, articulate a smaller note value throughout the example; this is akin to finding the "greatest common factor" in math, and it's what we call subdivision. Since we have mostly eighth notes, let's turn each quarter note into two articulated eighth notes: Then, let's tie together any ...


13

Beyond the obvious - the two rhythms are different - it helps to have some context on the history and use of the second rhythm. The second rhythm is often known as the tresillo and is historically popular in Latin American (particularly Cuban) music. It is however African in origin, having been bought to the Americas by slaves. More recently the tresillo has ...


12

There are many other good answers here but I wanted to add one thing: Get a Looping Pedal! Besides actually playing with real people, nothing will improve your improvising, timing, and ability to experiment more than laying down some chords or riffs, trying it 3-4 times until you get the timing perfect, then playing other stuff over that, then trying to loop ...


12

Colloquially it's often described as 'that rhythm from 'America' (West Side Story).


12

The measure comes from solo of "Nothing Else Matters" by Metallica. The first warning sign is that it is notated in 6/8 while the original song is in 3/4 (but see the edits below). This suggest the score is not well written, and indeed there is a mistake in the measure you quoted. You can find better rhythm notation in this video: ...


12

This is called Tresillo. It's a 3+3+2 rhythm: for example, X: 1 T: Tresillo K: none M: 2/4 L: 1/16 V:V1 staff=perc stafflines=1 B3B- B2B2 :| It originates in sub-Saharan Africa, and is very common in Cuban and Latin American music. Here's the first measure of the song so you can see it in context: X: 1 T: Kamouraska K: none M: 4/4 L: 1/16 %%staves {(RH) (LH)...


11

I would argue that it's a question of levels. In other words, the confusion is caused due to the different hierarchical levels of the meter (the eighth-note level and the measure level). You're correct that the 2+2+3 pattern, when we focus on that eighth-note level of a 7/8 measure, doesn't necessarily suggest any "normal accents [that] reoccur ...


10

NOTE: See bottom of post for edit in light of new information since the original answer There are two sets of pulses involved here: the "small" pulses -- in groups of 3 or 2 -- and the "large" pulses -- of which the exercise, as you've described it, requires four total. It sounds like you're conflating the "large" pulse strength ...


10

What you're hearing I would consider as added beats rather than missing ones. The general term for how beats are grouped is meter. Meter is the pattern of strong and weak pulses that underlie the music -- the places where you might clap along. All genres of Western music tend to have a regular meter throughout the piece; however, in more contemporary music (&...


10

Usually when a question mentions "too many notes", it means there are multiple voices. The 1/16th rest looks like it might belong to a different voice. EDIT: The question did not mention "Nothing Else Matters" when I wrote this answer. If you look at the accompaniment guide written above the staff, below the chord symbols D5, C5, G, F#, ...


9

After hearing the audio and seeing your examples, the written example 2 is rhythmically accurate BUT I would suggest this rhythm be written in quarters and eighths, not eighths and sixteenths. My reasoning for this is it doesn’t FEEL like 8ths and 16ths, it feels like a faster 4/4 with a backbeat on 2 and 4 as opposed to a slow 4 with the back beats on the ...


9

I would stray away from your first notation, as you've sensed. Trained musicians won't find it too confusing, but it's uncommon enough that it may occasionally trip someone up. (I admit that your last measure in the right hand, with the dotted-quarter rest, looks really strange to me even though I know exactly what it's saying. It's just not something we're ...


9

I don't know why we're getting such complicated answers/comments to this simple question. The triplet is a smooth rhythm with three equal notes. The other is a more jerky, syncopated rhythm. They're not just different 'in theory'. They're similar but different, period. Like apples and oranges are both round fruits, but they're DIFFERENT round fruits. ...


9

Yes. There are a variety of ways metrically arrhythmic musical events can occur. Aleatoric music The idea behind aleatory is that musical events occur unpredictably. The primary modern example of this is John Cage's Music of Changes (Wikipedia, YouTube) Another example is Joshua Banks Mailman's "comprovisation" series, in which sensors are attached ...


8

In Couperin's time, a dot after a note-head didn't always mean to extend the duration by exactly 50%. Here, each dot means to extend the duration by just the right amount so as to make the durations in the top line match the bass.


8

I've found this pdf with an analog notation 3/2 like yours with 6 beamed white notes. They say that these notes have the double value (quarter notes, not eighth) and they must be played almost legato: The example on the far right is notated with white notes. It says “On la note aussi de cette façon6 ". In fact, Couperin notices three of the four ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible