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19

It's not hopeless, but may take more time than others would. A couple of ideas. While listening to music, start tapping, singing, nodding, whatever, and turn down the sound, initially so it's still just audible, for several seconds. Turn back up, see if you're still in time. Gradually leave the silence longer until you can manage several bars. I used to do ...


14

One of my mantras as a teacher is to tell my students to play things "painfully slow." In other words, so slow it hurts. I would say you are practicing too fast. When playing an instrument, there are many, many things to consider all at the same time. In your case, you have rhythm, notes, strumming direction, etc. It takes time for the brain to process all ...


13

The pause is one that comes straight to mind - the rhythm stops, and everything hangs for some moments. Rubato has a similar effect, as do rallentando and accelerando. Crescendo and decrescendo can also be used to produce tension - especially in the way Beethoven used it. Never felt certain that it wasn't his frustration showing through... A key change is ...


12

It's definitely a mess; there are a couple of notational aspects that suggest the person that did this is not well-versed in notational norms. Listening to the recording on the website you listed in the comments, it's clear that the triplet figure should encompass the first three eighth notes, not just the first two. (Indeed, there is a weird 3 above the ...


8

First, let's remember what time signatures like 3/2 and 3/4 indicate: that each measure comprises three of the denominator's note values. In other words, a measure of 3/2 comprises three half notes, since the denominator "2" signifies half notes. As such, any time signature with a 3 in the numerator already "divide[s] the measure [by] 3," since that's ...


8

There's one word that clearly distinguishes these two concepts, and I'm a little stunned it doesn't appear in any of your sources: hierarchy. (Edit: Although I see Dom's answer at Music Fans uses this term!) Meter is a hierarchy of beats. Such a hierarchy determines which beats are emphasized (though authors vary on how they define "emphasis" here), the ...


8

Oh, goodness. Please, for your own sake, find another version of this. No musician should ever have to play from something like this. It's likely this score wasn't created by a human (or at the very least, not a musician). Find another score ASAP; you're only wasting your time by trying to read this score. As a sample of some of the notational atrocities ...


8

You could also have a pickup measure at the start of your piece if that extra beat happens to be the first beat of your song. They look like: Note also that if you do this, convention dictates that the last measure of the piece be shorter by the amount you added to the beginning (but recently, this convention's been on the decline in modern music).


7

In very general terms, I'd say that deliberately withholding some element of music that the listener knows (or thinks they know) is coming will always build tension. It could be a harmonic a resolution that's a long time coming - for example, if you use Emin, Fmaj and Gmaj chords, then the listener might assume you're in the key of Cmaj/Amin, because that's ...


7

On and off beats really exist on a spectrum, and determining whether beats 2 and 4 are on or off is really a question of tempo. If the music is fast enough, we can start to feel the 4/4 time in (as we say) a large 2, meaning that 1234 starts to sound like 1&2&. In such cases, 2 and 4 are definitely heard as off the beat, with 1 and 3 being on. But ...


7

Go back to playing basic notes - the pentatonic scale will do. Se t the metronome for around 80-90 bpm. Play notes on each beat. So far, so simple! Then play on beats 1,2 3, not 4. Then try beats 1,2 not 3 but 4, all for several bars. There are several different combinations to try, using similar ideas. Then try 1,2,3,4, 1-3- in two bar sequences. The idea ...


7

If you are talking to other musicians about what is or should be played you might say "on the upbeats" "on the off beats" or "on the up strokes". Context is key here as the meaning can easily be confused with weak beats. You could even clarify by saying "the 'ands'" but this could sound a bit amateur so use sparingly.


6

It can happen when the groupings of note change per measure and don't stress any exact metric pattern. While not common, it can happen and the most famous example of this is in the 3rd movement of Quartet for the End of Time. As you can see the tempo is defined, but the meter is not. The eighth note gets the tempo markings, but it's not technically the ...


6

Polyrhythms, especially more complex ones like this, make much more sense if you chart it out. Find the least common multiple. In this case, its 51. List out all numbers between 1 and 51. Circle every 17th number. Square every 3rd number. What you have left is a way to count any given polyrhythm. Obviously the larger your multiple, the harder it is to ...


6

My first thought is do it the way that is most comfortable to you. However, It can't hurt to learn it every way you can think of. Reason being it will help you down the line when some odd rhythm is put in front of you. Practicing it different ways will help you be more versatile if you really work at it or it will allow you to find some weak spots in ...


5

I don't personally see anything wrong with this notation; it's perfectly clear! If I came across it in a score, I would know exactly what was intended. It's a slightly tricky rhythm to perform, because the performer must subdivide the first two sixteenth notes in three before immediately switching to a duple subdivision starting on the third sixteenth note. ...


5

I'm not sure about a "family tree" per se, but you may be interested in reading Rhythmic Archetypes in Instrumental Music from Africa and the Diaspora. It's a scholarly article available for free at Music Theory Online. The author (James Burns) discusses six rhythmic archetypes in instrumental music of Africa and the Diaspora. (Here I slightly broaden your ...


5

We could try to guess what that notation meant, but it would only BE a guess. If the two bars are supposed to be the same length, the two dotted 8s add up to... No, I'm not even going to try. It's a mess. Just possibly if you showed us the whole page, or at least a whole line of music it might make sense.


5

I doubt anything's messed up. You're just having to think too hard about where your fingers go. When this becomes more automatic, you'll be able to think more about keeping in time. Practice SLOWLY to a click. Or use a 'drum machine', it's more fun. CAN you get your fingers to the next position on time? If not, practice even slower. And make sure your ...


5

Short Answer: Just tap eighth notes throughout the entire subject. You'll find that the G♯ lasts four eighth notes, not three or five. Furthermore, Gould gives slight accents to the first of each slurred two-note grouping; this shows that he's accenting the stronger downbeats as opposed to each upbeat. He's definitely playing it the right way! Long Answer: ...


5

I'd start easy. See if you can feel triplets. See if you can switch easily between feeling triplets and feeling duplets or quadruplets. Once you've got that down, see if you can feel quintuplets (or at least have a strong enough pulse that you can try stuffing 5 notes in each beat instead of 3 or 4).


5

Yes, your markings are correct. Remove the stems-up voice from the RH and all will become clear. A little more horizontal space would have allowed the engraver to make it rather more clear. But once you see the pattern of repeated D# 16ths, it's not too bad.


5

It looks fine to me. It would also fit into 4/4 but the main difference is where the accents fall. Usually, you want the downbeat to be the strongest beat in the measure. Combining the first line into two 4/4 bars would mean that the second beat of your current 2/4 bar would become a downbeat. If that doesn't seem right to you, I would keep it the way you ...


5

The top line in the snap above is the right-hand part of bar 7. The bottom line might help you work out how to count it. I've rewritten the dotted eighth note as a sixteenth note tied to an eighth note. If you took all the ties out it would be the ra-ta-tum-tum rhythm from 'The Little Drummer Boy' Firstly try playing the phrase leaving out the tie marked ...


5

Beatmaking stems from the use of a regular acoustic drum kit in rock, pop, and perhaps especially R&B and funk. Early beats that were made with drum machines or samples were usually meant to re-create beats played on actual drum kits. The most commonly used pieces of the drum kit are just as you list: Kick Snare Hi-hat (open and closed) Many of the ...


5

In the early stages it's sometimes difficult to count, especially rests and longer notes. Something needs to be there at the point where you don't actually play a note - either because the last note lasts longer, or there's a rest. Various things can help, whether it's a nod of the head, shrug of the shoulders, tap of the foot, or even a sniff. In other ...


5

If it's called anything, it's called the 'and'. But it isn't really called anything special.


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