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47

The notes with stems up are for singing in Italian, while the notes with the stems down are for singing in German. Thus, in the first picture of the original posting, in Italian it would be ... while in German you should sing In the second picture of the original posting, the Italian lyrics have only one syllable (“voi”) while the German lyrics have two ...


17

A single dot after a note (or rest) indicates that you add half the value of the note before it. Each additional dot adds another half of the increment. In 4/4 time, a half note is 2 beats. There will be 2 quarter notes left in the measure. A dotted half note is 2 + 1 = 3 beats. A doubly dotted half note is 2 + 1 + 0.5 = 3.5 beats. A triply dotted half ...


16

It has to be this. An 8th tied to a half. Or, possibly, if the grouping is 2+3, split the dotted quarter into a tied quarter and 8th. I know you asked for NOT a tie. But that isn't how rhythmic notation works. And inventing a personal system for something as simple as this isn't sensible. Sorry!


14

A triple-dotted half note is two beats plus half of that, plus half of the addition, plus half of THAT addition. Easier to show in notation! Some engravers eschew double and triple dots on principle. Others find them acceptable in situations like my second example. They're mainstream enough to be offered as standard notation in all the popular notation ...


13

Well, I suppose this might be theoretically possible with some sort of combination of nested tuplet brackets, but then you'd just create a bar that would be incomprehensible to normal musicians. Keep in mind that where you put ties is not arbitrary: ties are frequently used to represent the beat structure, even when it is possible to write a single note ...


13

As mentioned in the other answer, it is convention, but there is a bit of logic behind the convention. A time signature of 3/4 is taken to mean that there are three quarter notes in each measure, so the fact that there are six eighth notes in a measure of 3/4 follows from subdividing each of the three quarter notes into two eighth notes. Logically, a time ...


11

They refer to non-tonal/non-harmonic sounds; be it drum sounds (these sounds don't follow a harmonic structure), or dead notes on a string instrument, or, as is the case in this example, rap (the rapper speaks the words without tuning them to a specific pitch). This is useful for notating rhythm parts that don't really have a pitch. It's used instead of "...


9

Just as with intonation, the ability to differentiate tempi exists within most musicians to varying degrees. I've met some drummers who could give you the BPM of a song they'd never heard before down to an error of 1 or 2 BPM. But that's kind of like the "perfect pitch" thing, where it's a cool skill to have (especially for a drummer), but it's not an ...


9

There are a number of different possible ways of measuring the threshold of tempo perception. It's one type of task to say to someone: "Play me a tempo of 120bpm" out of thin air with no context, and then to measure how accurate they are. It's a completely different task to say: "We'll start you off playing at Tempo A. Maintain a consistent tempo for a ...


8

You could also have a pickup measure at the start of your piece if that extra beat happens to be the first beat of your song. They look like: Note also that if you do this, convention dictates that the last measure of the piece be shorter by the amount you added to the beginning (but recently, this convention's been on the decline in modern music).


8

The basic rule is not to write a note which "crosses" the mid point of a bar in 4/4. Either of your bars 3 and 4 are OK, and 3 is usually easier to read. One exception to the "don't cross the mid point" rule is if the whole bar is syncopated, like the last bar in the example below.


8

As it turns out, you just plain can't do this with only one note value. In fact, in Are ties necessary?, the questioner cites this exact problem of five eighth notes as one possible reason why ties must be used in our notational system. Which leads to the next obvious question: why are you seeking a solution that uses only one a single note? In all meters, ...


8

It is convention. The two are different, even though mathematically they contain the same amount of notes. In 3/4, the count is 1-2-3,1-2-3.Simple time. Thus, as you state, there would be 3 beats, each containing two quavers. Since 6/8 is compound time, it will be written out differently. It's basically two 'beats', each comprised of three quavers.So it's ...


7

If you are talking to other musicians about what is or should be played you might say "on the upbeats" "on the off beats" or "on the up strokes". Context is key here as the meaning can easily be confused with weak beats. You could even clarify by saying "the 'ands'" but this could sound a bit amateur so use sparingly.


6

My first thought is do it the way that is most comfortable to you. However, It can't hurt to learn it every way you can think of. Reason being it will help you down the line when some odd rhythm is put in front of you. Practicing it different ways will help you be more versatile if you really work at it or it will allow you to find some weak spots in ...


6

Your example was the standard notation for vocal parts up to about 1950. The beams indicate the notes sung to one syllable of the lyrics. You will find almost all "pre-computer-engraving" vocal scores written that way. The slurs in your example show exactly the same thing as the beaming, and were sometimes omitted, except over quarter notes or longer which ...


6

The 'rule' about not crossing the centre of 4/4 time is an old one, but a good one nevertheless. It makes reading easier - which after all is what writing music out should be about. Personally, i'm happier reading things like this with ties, where it can be seen simply that there's syncopation. However - since the sound of drums generally don't have any or ...


6

By crikey this is broad. You've basically asked "What's the difference between 'white' music & 'black' music?" Because you could write entire books on the subject & still not arrive at any real definition, especially in this day & age when everybody's borrowed from everybody else to such a degree as it's almost impossible to disentangle any more,...


5

If it's called anything, it's called the 'and'. But it isn't really called anything special.


5

Counting while playing is already the way to go! Be patient and don't give up. It will come. I think what will help you is practicing to identify the big beats in a rhytmically complicated measure. Do it often just with the score, away from the piano. There's no shame in indicating with a small pencil line where every beat falls, for complicated rhythms you ...


5

If you have a strong enough 4/4 mindset you can impose it on this piece I suppose! But I really think you ARE imposing it. Maybe MY knowledge of how it's notated is affecting my perception. But I think the slurs, to mention just one element, work against your hypothesis. I think the music is intended to depict a relaxed stroll around the exhibition, ...


5

In the early stages it's sometimes difficult to count, especially rests and longer notes. Something needs to be there at the point where you don't actually play a note - either because the last note lasts longer, or there's a rest. Various things can help, whether it's a nod of the head, shrug of the shoulders, tap of the foot, or even a sniff. In other ...


5

Music notation conventions have changed, at different times in history. Bach did not give any tempo indication for the prelude and wrote it in common time. Therefore the written "beat" was a quarter note, i.e. every four written notes. In Bach's time, musical tempos were defined relative to the human heart beat, not as MM values (the metronome had not yet ...


5

This is always a tough situation, but it is definitely something pro musicians will have to deal with at some point. A friend of mine once pointed out several instances of the beat getting flipped during some classic jazz recordings. I can't remember them specifically, but the recordings included some of the best jazz musicians ever, like Thelonius Monk and ...


5

Rudiments are compared to scales in the way that scales are an exercise for warming up your fingers, working on speed or getting certain motions in to your hands/fingers. They can be used in the same way, as warmups, as speed exercises and to get certain aspects of technique down. Just like you might hear a scale run in a song or a partial scale run in a ...


5

Yes, typically what you're hearing referred to as "boom bap" is what's called (to normal musicians) a breakbeat -- which differs from a steady or "four-on-the-floor" beat, in the sense that the lower percussive element (kick) is on a broken beat. So you have four distinctive rhythmic elements in play. As far as I know, all of these have roots in rock/blues/...


5

There are actually four possibilities: IMHO all of these are acceptable, although I find the first one easiest to read. The third one looks unneccessarily complicated and the fourth looks a bit 'unusual', but would probably be a good choice if there was half a page of this rhythm.


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