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2

I'm not sure of the term "isometer" in music. There is a similar term: "isorhythm" which is a technique of using the same rhythmic structure, usually short 4-7 or so notes, against a fixed pitch-pattern. For example, using 4 notes such as C-A-G E (but not played as quietly as the original) with a rhythm of half-whole-half- whole-hole ...


2

One thing to add to Tim's excellent answer: Notice the first three eighth-notes in the measure are written in a way that implies two hands should be used (one in each staff). The remainder of the measure, the final 5 eighth-notes, are a bit ambiguous, and quite possibly spaced too far apart to be playable with one hand, but are certainly a single phrase. ...


17

There's two things going on here that may be a bit confusing. There are cross-stave notes, like you already noted. The rhythm is a so called 'tresillo' rhythm, that's often used in latin-american music. Here the rhythm is structured as 3+3+2 in eighth notes. The note groupings and accents reflect this rhythm. That's why it can seem a bit awkward to read ...


0

This is similar to the hemiola rhythm. IME hemiola is more often found in pieces in 3/4, where accents on the 1 and 3 of one bar, and the 2 of the next bar, give a momentary feel of a 3/2 bar -- still three-time, but with the beats being twice as long. Now if you changed the notation, and wrote triplet quavers/8ths instead of crotchets/quarters, then the ...


1

Above you have eighth-note triplets, and below you have quarter-note triplets. It's largely as simple as that. Keep in mind that a triplet is three notes within the time span of only two of those notes. So you can have all kinds of triplets based on all kinds of note values. Similar logic applies to tuplets more generally. Occasionally I've heard quarter-...


0

The excerpt shown is composed and performed in a consistent 3+2 meter. In the score Bar 2 Although the tenor and bass sing stressed syllables on beat 3, there are other elements working against this being a point of emphasis within the measure. The presence of a descending line tends to draw emphasis away, particularly when set against an ascending line, ...


2

This post comes in three parts: 1) basics 2) techniques 3) examples Rhythmic counterpoint basics Rhythmic counterpoint requires one of two conditions: Pulse onsets occur at different times, Pulse onsets occur at different intensities. Example of condition 1 X:1 T:Rhythmic Counterpoint T:condition 1 example K:none M:C V:P1 K:none clef=perc stafflines=1 V:...


2

No need to over-think this. Homophony is when two (or more) musical voices follow the same rhythm. Counterpoint is when they don't. The terms are most often used to describe music where pitches as well as rhythms are involved. But it's an easy leap to the concept of purely rhythmic counterpoint. And poly-meter - like a 3/4 rhythm being played against a ...


1

I think what you are asking about must be about polyrhythm not polymeter. Counterpoint literally means "point against point" as in pitch against pitch, or two melodic lines that follow different pitch contours. But, another way to describe counterpoint is independence of parts. Different rhythms in different parts is an effective way to achieve ...


1

A better looking grouping: \relative c' { \override TupletBracket.bracket-visibility = #'if-no-beam \times 2/3 { c16 c \set stemRightBeamCount = #1 c } \times 2/3 { \set stemLeftBeamCount = #1 c c c } } yields this:


2

A good performer should be able to make almost any sequence of notes sound in almost any metre. They will do this by emphasizing key beats in some way, with subtle (or, if they're forcing something far outside its "natural" metre, not-so-subtle) variations in volume and/or intonation.


1

The main point of time signatures is that they compartmentalise the rhythm of a piece. Often, a piece can be 'written' without the 'composer' even considering what the time signature might be. It's when it actually gets written down as music that it becomes important, academically.That's when the emphases are notated. If there's a pulse that gets repeated ...


1

If the piece is a vocal, the stress pattern of the lyrics generally indicates the rhythm. There some options as to the number of unstressed syllables between stressed syllables. For example, dactyls can be represented by a long note and two short or an accented note and two unaccented or something similar. A choice may be chosen based on tradition (makes ...


1

It totally depends on the mood you're going for, and honestly I'd say deciding a time signature, a key, a melody, and a concept are all things that are a part of your decision when composing a piece of your own and there shouldn't really be an answer. That being said, here's my personal tip: start with trying to find a basic melody, or at least a subject / ...


0

It's mostly to do with musical grammar. For example, as a general rule, crotchets or minims shouldn't be placed on the 4th quaver of a 4/4 (and more so a 2/2) bar - as in your bar 12 - as they conceal the mid-point of the bar. Ties are needed. [4/4 bars ARE often divided into eg. 3 + 2 + 3, but your left hand here is clearly in standard 4/4 or 2/2.] I haven'...


1

One simple way is to simply play notes/sounds with a different velocity/volume. If you take a single note and play it at regular intervals, but in a pattern: Loud - soft - medium - soft - Loud - soft - medium - soft - Loud - soft - medium - soft etc... you'll have created a rhythmic feel. As well as volume, you can also alter timbre of the note, or how much ...


2

It seems that you're asking how music without direct rhythm instruments (like drums as the most basic example) ends up still sounding with a specific time signature and beats. If not I'll re-answer but I'll do my best to explain how rhythm is indicated with just pitched notes. TL;DR you can repeat notes/chords which basically acts like a drum, or you can use ...


1

My understanding is that old plainsong was deliberately non-metered. According to a book I have about hymnody the purpose was to distinguish it from secular, metered music. The quote from the book seems to reinforce that idea by promoting a flexible approach to rhythm: "...allow the singers freedom of rhythm..." He also says the various notes used ...


3

agreed this is a Typical Bolero with a 3:2 then 2:3 Clave Pattern - I wrote this song in 2005 for my Group Guitarra Azul on our first Album! I hope you Like it!


3

For MIDI purposes, you'll have to stick with ties. Because standard notation is binary (i.e. whole note = 2 half notes; half note = 2 quarter notes; etc.) there's no way to build a "5" note without them. For a "performance edition", here are a couple of alternatives. Notate in 4/2 time, half-note = 76bpm, "swing" feel. This ...


2

We walk in straight rhythm and skip in swing rhythm. When we walk the sound of our feet goes: LEFT (wait) RIGHT (wait) LEFT (wait) RIGHT (wait) The 'waits' get shorter when we walk more quickly. When we skip (I mean without a rope) our feet go: LEFT (wait) left RIGHT (wait) right LEFT (wait) left RIGHT (wait) right I've written the loudest sounds in ...


0

Straight rhythm is exactly as quoted. Every pulse or beat is exactly the same length as every other. Swing is rather different. I use 'the Humpty Dumpty' rhythm concept with students. I suppose 'Frere Jacques' would be appropriate for the straight rhythm. By saying each of these, the idea of how they differ should be apparent.


-1

"Swing" is often interpreted as follows play two consecutive notes as if they were a dotted triplet, so count (1, 2) as (1, 2, 3) and tie the 1 and 2 together. By counting (1, 2) as (1, 2, 3) this has to fit into the same overall time. So 4/4 might get counted as 6, using quarter note triplets each half note is a group (1, 2, 3) and the swing ...


1

In "straight" rhythm, notes which last a half beat are of equal time value: that is, they divide the beat evenly in half. In "swing" rhythm, those same notes are played unequally, with the first a bit longer and the second a bit shorter. A John Philip Sousa March is the perfect example of straight rhythm. Contrast that with the rhythm in ...


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