New answers tagged

13

If you write it in larger note-values I think the palindrome becomes clearer. Did you transcribe it from some recording, or make it up?


1

This notation is absolute nonsense! The aim of a rhythmic notation is to convey and transfer a rhythmic idea that is readable and hopefully performable for the musicians and understandably for the audience. We even don’t know what to count and where to place an accent, which notes are on or off beat. If 1/8 is the beat a 15/8 time could be notated in 3x5/...


1

Imagine the strings are railways and the fingers are the wheels of a train. You can't displace one wheel after the other. The whole wagon has to be moved at once. *1) Start with Am and E changing tonic and dominant (pattern 123) or C - G7 only changing the index (1) and the Bass (C-G) then play the full chord 123 and turn softly the wrist diagonally that ...


0

My thoughts on this: Perhaps a recording device with multitrack capabilities and a recorded metronome (click) track of your choosing. I'm no expert in digital technology, but a recording program probably exists with such features as part of the package. Other folks on this site may be able to be more specific.


0

I'm sure this isn't the answer you're looking for, but a metronome is likely what you want. It's a device (or application - there are plenty) that gives off a tempo so that a musician can hear it and practice their rhythmic consistency. Metronomes have a long history of effective use in musical pedagogy, and I think it will do pretty much exactly what you ...


7

A bit more detail following piiperi's good suggestion. First play a good clean chord. Try to have at least some fingers touching others. Then release pressure, but still keep fingers touching the strings. press down again, and strum, to check the sound is still clean. Do this with each chord several times. Next, play a chord, but this time, take your ...


2

If you know the chords well that is a plus. When changing chords during strumming, quickly lift all your fingers simultaneously off the strings of the first chord and with the shape of the next chord in your head try and make your fingers change to the new shape all at once and land simultaneously on the next chord. The idea is to make it one consolidated ...


4

Practice the instantaneous pressing-down of the chord shape with your left hand fingers, without doing anything with your right hand. The pressing-down of strings makes a "hammer-on" sort of sound. It can't be as loud as fingering normally with your right hand, but try to make it reasonably loud, or at least loud enough to hear each of the fingered strings ...


0

There's SO much irritating about that tempo indication! All it needed was 'Swing q=120', or maybe 'swing 8s q=120'. What does 'c.120' mean? Indecision - 'pick a tempo somewhere round 120'? Fluctuation - 'play rubato centered on 120'? FFS just say 'q=120'. It's not as if the police are standing there with a metronome, we're going to play it how we ...


4

plays each 2 quavers in 'shuffle' style 2/12+1/12 instead of 1/8+1/8 That's exactly what he is supposed to do! When you see this at the start of a piece, you are basically told not to play straight eighths, but shuffle eighths (triplets like they are shown above -- that would be 2/12 and 1/12 like you said, although I've never heard anyone call them that)....


1

The first answer is on the money (BTW quaver = 8th note, semiquaver = 16th note). His or her advice is based on sight readers wanting to clearly see the beginning of every beat (in this case beat 2 of each bar) when 16th notes are involved. You can also substitute a single dotted 8th rest for the 16th and 8th note rests if you like.


2

As Peter explained, ties are not used in hand percussion. I agree with his suggestion to use the rest because it would be easier to sight-read for most performers. Also, your stem directions need to be adjusted if you're concerned about "correct" stems. Here's what that would look like: Note: StackX does not allow photos in comments, so that is why I posted ...


1

Ties are not usually used in percussion notation because they are considered unnecessary, since the player doesn't sustain the tones like wind or string players. There are a few exceptions to this rule, like piano and vibraphone, but generally percussion notation just needs to indicate the beginning the notes. So the second option is the better of those two,...


2

I agree with you. If the intention of the composer is the exact rhythm posted, don't use a tuplet. Write out the dotted eighths, so one can see how they line up against the beats. For additional comprehension, one could use both: I've definitely seen scores with the literal (in this case, dotted eighth) rhythm written on the staff, with tuplets stemmed ...


2

Looking at the whole piece, I'd say the the first 5 measures are a rather rhapsodic introduction to an otherwise fairly metrical main section and I think the slightly odd rhythmic notation helps to emphasise this. There isn't a 3rd or 4th beat in the measure, and I don't think that renotating in dotted eighth-notes would help much. Play the first two quarter-...


-2

Any meaningful argument either way needs more context. These two bars don't exist in isolation from the rest of the piece, which we haven't seen. For all we know, the "best" notation might be something completely different, like


3

I know many people in the "English" system (not just in England, of course) who would say that the "e" and "+" should be silent, as if represented by rests. This method only emphasizes the attacks of notes, leaving duration ambiguous. The method you describe focuses on the binary state of "sound is present" or "silence", and it represents this unambiguously....


0

Yes, the Wikipedia writer classes a simple backbeat as syncopation. I disagree. I'd just call that a 'backbeat'. Reserving 'syncopation' for rhythms with accents that DON'T align with the prevailing beat.


0

You could really just think of it as a 4/4 swing/tuplet. I know the real classical guys are going to hate me for that ;)) I don't get any kind of 3/4 vibe from it at all, listening to it, & as it's mainly in dotted crotchets, it sits mostly in a straight 4 with the occasional triplet. 1 2 3 2 2 3 3 2 3 4 2 3 is really how it feels to me


1

Before the invention of the metronome, musical tempo was described relative to the human heart beat rate, usually assumed to be around 80 BPM. In general the tempo was counted as something between 60 and 120 BPM. So in its historical context, there is no way this would have been counted as 3/4 time at a very fast tempo. That sort of interpretation by a ...


0

As far as basic music theory goes, it COULD be 3/4 time. A piece in 3/4 may well fall into 4-bar phrases, aurally indistinguishable from 4 bars of slow 12/8. There are historical conventions that tell us a Jig is likely to be written in 3/8 rather than 3/4, a Viennese waltz in 'one in a bar' 3/4 rather than 3/8 or 12/8. Military marches used to be notated ...


2

Without access to a tempo marking, it's quite ambiguous.It's a very slow 12/8. and I could easily have identified it as 6/8. As 3/4, the count would be quite rapid, although that in itself wouldn't discount it from being in 3/4. There is often a discrepancy as to what time sig. one puts on anything - 2/2 or 4/4, for example. And often 12/8 is written in 4/4 ...


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