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0

A rhythm generator seems more adapted to what you want to do. There are plenty of them available as free (and open) softwares (hydrogen for instance). You can also set a complicated metronome in most DAWs, but this is not really a rhythm...


10

There are many other good answers here but I wanted to add one thing: Get a Looping Pedal! Besides actually playing with real people, nothing will improve your improvising, timing, and ability to experiment more than laying down some chords or riffs, trying it 3-4 times until you get the timing perfect, then playing other stuff over that, then trying to loop ...


1

How about combining the Blues with dancing and March music? Drawing a square - each side 4 steps = 1 measure. Marking the 4x4 footsteps by small circles. Walking the square by counting 1234 and left right left right Each side = 1 bar, 4 sides = 1 line of the blues Walking the square 3 turns = 12 bars of the blues = 1 verse When this pattern went over ...


2

As others have said, it's important to train yourself to respect rhythm if you want to be able to jam with others. It's also important to be able to anticipate planned chord changes correctly. However, starting with counting is probably not what you need. You already seem to have a feel for rhythm (otherwise your beatboxing wouldn't sound great), though not ...


1

Definitely a problem if ever you want to play alongside others. If everyone in a band picked their own timing then complete chaos would result. May I suggest you practise by introducing a spoken count into your beat-boxing. So: One ****, Two ****, Three ***, Four ****, One ****, Two ****, Three ***, Four ****, etc. Also playing along with a metronome is a ...


1

A metronome is a useful tool to use - particularly one that goes 'ping, click, click, click, ping'. A drum machine is, in my opinion, an even better tool, especially for those of us who are used to playing with a drummer. Both are used regularly by musos, with no shame. They provide something steady that we latch on to, giving our attention other maybe more ...


1

It may be annoying now to count, because you need to go through the training process, but eventually it will become instinctive and you won't need to count. While doing the training actually count beats out loud. This can difficult at first, especially when one of the parts starts to use syncopated rhythms. But eventually it will come to you. Keep in mind ...


3

Rhythm is a part of music. A very important part in today's popular styles. And, while rhythm CAN be free, mostly we prefer it when it's organised into a repetitive 'groove'. I suspect your beatboxing IS 'in time', you just haven't formalised the concept. This 'one chord per bar' thing sounds like the instruction for an elementary exercise in improvisation....


4

This is something I struggled with when I played improv trumpets solos in my school's jazz band years back. I had always practiced at home without any metronome and I would just play around chord changes that I made up in my head rather than listening to an external source and improvise. What did this do? Well the biggest thing I noticed was that it was ...


1

"Is it necessary to practice staying in time while improvising?" Nothing is "necessary" in this context. Improv is improv, even time and tempo fluctuate during improvisation, as well as in orchestrated pieces. The real question is whether you are in control of what you do. In my youth I often heard young musicians respond to their own ...


0

It will bite you in the butt and hinder further development if you are ever told to improvise on an established chord progression such as the 12-bar blues. Mess up and make the initial tonic chord section more than the standard 4 bars long, and listeners may no longer treat you so kindly. Shorten the first time the IV chord is used to 1 bar long instead of 2,...


18

While playing by yourself, you do what you want. In time, out of time, seems no-one cares! The potential problems will come when you play with others. I've played with many like you appear to be, and it's not hard work - it's almost impossible! So, the decision will be yours. If you only ever want to play alone, probably for your own amusement, then take no ...


0

Here's a way of thinking about it that helps me. You are trying to fit a group of 6 notes into the same space as a group of 4 notes. 6 / 4 = 1.5 So your right hand should play 1.5 notes for every note the left hand plays.


1

What you have there are groups of six in the RH against groups of four in the LH. In principle, that's the same as groups of three against groups of two, in other words triplets vs duplets - you just have two sets per note grouping. If you are used to playing triplets in one hand whilst playing duplets in the other, you'll do fine playing them using the same ...


0

Each beamed group is a beat, and the two hands have a different number of notes within each beat. You’re playing six notes in the right hand while only playing four notes in the left. The result is that the first and fourth note in each beat of the right hand will line up with the first and third note of the left, but the other notes won’t happen at the same ...


1

I’d say that many - if not all - performances differ from score, as each score is only an approximation of the musical intention of the composer. Only a computer will play exactly what is written - because this machine is not a musician. In the other way: If you want to notate exactly the performance of an artist the score would be unreadable because of all ...


4

These are called duplets. They tell you to play two quavers (8th notes) in the time of three quavers. These are used in compound time-signatures (6/8, 9/8, 12/8, 6/4, 9/4 etc.) where each beat consists of three sub-beats (or sub-divisions). As these time-signatures group notes in threes, a duplet allows you to have two equal length notes in the time of this ...


2

the 3-3-2 pattern is called a tresillo. It's a very popular rhythm in Latin influenced music (as the first answer states) and can be found in pop music like Ed Sheeran's "Shape of You."


4

Yes, this is very common in popular music with a Latin influence. It's like the first half of the 'clave' rhythm that underlies much of this genre.


3

The basic 'rule' - 4/4 bars should be split into two equal halves. That way they're easier to read. But if there's only a minim breaking that 'rule', it's not difficult to read anyway. And more and more, written music seems to be ignoring that, which makes some not so easy to read. The whole purpose of writing dots on paper is so that they can be read as ...


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