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As I already commented, I think the reason you're mislead is melodic rather than rhythmic. Simplified it is this: X:1 L:1/8 M:C K:C#m %%score T1 V:T1 clef=treble % 1 [V:T1] z5 c cd | e4 c2 z1 c | cb, cb, cb, ce | c4 r4 Crucially, the first note of bar 2 is an E. Now, that is contained in F♯7, but not in F♯ per se. Thus is has a bit of a non-chord-...


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I've always heard "Thriller"'s verse like this: (intro bass vamp) ... F♯7 chord lands squarely on the first beat of bar one of the cycle, and counting eighth notes, we hear: 1 + 2 + 3 "It's close to...". Alternatively, it's easy to remember that the bass riff B-C♯-E-F♯-C♯ lines up squarely on the eighth notes: 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + B C♯ E F♯ C♯ Notice where ...


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Basically, you 'learned' it the wrong way & every time you hear it again without preparation, you fail to correct it until that key moment. The word 'midnight' is on the first beat of bar two of the section, not one. Count it right from the top if you have to. A late thought on this is that it's relatively rare for a 'good' song to 'follow the chords'. ...


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Another problem could be latency when recording with the backing track. If you import the track, then attempt to play along with it. Depending on what you are recording, acoustics, electronic kit with internal sounds or electronic kit triggering samples there will be varying degrees of latency. It wouldn't be a big deal with drumless tracks but the double ...


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People tell me I keep good time when playing. If this compliment is true, I put a lot of it down to years of keyboard/drum machine/vocals gigs round the clubs in my (relative) youth. And later, playing with some excellent drummers. You soon learn the difference between 'expressive rubato' and simple not keeping up or rushing! Yes, if you're playing ...


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The examples are from Dave Weigert's "Workshop for bass and drums - How to play in bands" book, one of the authoritative sources, I'd say. The thing is, both examples are shown as examples of Non-Specific Notation. Basically, it is up to you to interpret it on the instrument. One way I interpret the instruction about the rhythm slashes is - the first case ...


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To partly address your question, I would recommend going through the video series on How to Practise With a Metronome in a Relaxed, Enjoyable & Precise Way. It does not seem very popular but shows an excellent method to become comfortable playing with the metronome and develop the sense of time.


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I developed my sense of the beat and rhythm as a small child when I did things like learn to dance and skip down the sidewalk and I listened to a lot of beat heavy music. Also I was fascinated by the person who led the choir at church and as a child often imitated the arm movements he made when I heard music playing, pretending to be the band leader myself. ...


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It can be hard to develop a consistent beat working only with a metronome, because one's own playing is often louder than the metronome, and because you can have a slightly inconsistent tempo and still not be obviously "off" from the metronome. The best thing is to feel the beat, or the tempo, in your body. Find different ways of moving around the room ...


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The question is anything but clear! But I'm guessing someone has told you you're emphasising beats 1 and 3, when they think it should be 2 and 4, or possibly vice versa. It's quite easy to get confused - does one clap on 1 and 3, or 2 and 4? Well, it doesn't really matter. As long as one knows where beat 1 is, either will do! In pop music, often beat 1 is ...


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If you really want to go full math-rock, you could always put notes on the beats given by floor( sqrt(2) * n), for n = 1, 2, 3, ... This will generate notes on beats 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, ... X: 1 K: Cmaj M: L: 1/4 A A z A A z A A A z A A z A A A z A A z A Mathematically, it can be proven that this pattern will never ...


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The 'rule' about not crossing the centre of 4/4 time is an old one, but a good one nevertheless. It makes reading easier - which after all is what writing music out should be about. Personally, i'm happier reading things like this with ties, where it can be seen simply that there's syncopation. However - since the sound of drums generally don't have any or ...


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The basic rule is not to write a note which "crosses" the mid point of a bar in 4/4. Either of your bars 3 and 4 are OK, and 3 is usually easier to read. One exception to the "don't cross the mid point" rule is if the whole bar is syncopated, like the last bar in the example below.


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Both are correct, but the 3rd bar looks more tidy and natural.


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