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1

Learn the stick grips and how to use them and switch between them. Basically do a YouTube search for how to hit a drum and how to hit a cymbal. The precise way you hit drums and cymbals makes a big, big difference. Learn drum rudiments, and not just how to play them. Practice them every day using the exact sticking notated. Practice with a metronome, ...


0

You need to see a teacher. Period.


0

the Indian rhythm system called konnokol gives a very good approach on applying rhythm in a musical and oral context. It connects the improvisation by using spoken rhythms in combination with keeping control with the clapping of your hands. For example try this: Speak "ta ki ta" repeatedly representing 3 notes with equal length. clap on every 1st, 4th, ...


11

They refer to non-tonal/non-harmonic sounds; be it drum sounds (these sounds don't follow a harmonic structure), or dead notes on a string instrument, or, as is the case in this example, rap (the rapper speaks the words without tuning them to a specific pitch). This is useful for notating rhythm parts that don't really have a pitch. It's used instead of "...


2

Basically you would count it like that:


-2

How the count is constructed: (2 Bar count is 1&2&3&4&1&2&3&4) wher the number represents the downbeat and the "&" represents the upbeat: Proper count for this example: 1 2& & & Proper count if the bar is repeated: 1 2& & &1 2& & & VISUAL:


0

No, the explanation is not clear. The 'four in the bar' slashes tell you to 'play time'. Basically do what a rhythm section DOES, in a suitable style for the piece. The explicit rhythms in bars 2 and 3 of the first example tell you to play exactly those rhythms, and nothing else. The second example tells the rhythm section to continue playing time, but ...


0

It's not crystal clear! in the top example, I'd be playing kick on 1,2,3 and 4, while bass plays four A notes - or possibly A C E G. Second bar is syncopated,so kick and probably cymbal (maybe choked on notes 1 and 2) on all three notes, but bass would play A, A B♭ - the last 'pushed'. The second is ambiguous! Perhaps the writer wants the bass and ...


1

Your interpretation of the first example is good. The second example should be played exactly like the first one. It's just notated differently. Both examples are badly notated: the Bb7 should be over the last eight note in the bar before.


2

When played without an accent on the second 3/4's downbeat, then you're right in hearing it as 4/4 + 2/4 or, more pedantically, 3/2. That accent may often be omitted because it would distract from the melody, which is more interesting than the straightforward harmony. Why do "they" still notate it as 3/4? Because how it progresses from teacher to pupil ...


0

Trying to turn comments into an answer - though I'm with Peter's answer too... Someone has to take charge - who that may be might depend on who is normally in charge, who noticed it, who can think how to fix it without further confusing the situation... it's not easy & I'm not sure how much preparation can go into 'practising' for such a recovery. By ...


5

This is always a tough situation, but it is definitely something pro musicians will have to deal with at some point. A friend of mine once pointed out several instances of the beat getting flipped during some classic jazz recordings. I can't remember them specifically, but the recordings included some of the best jazz musicians ever, like Thelonius Monk and ...


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