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2

It is convention. The two are different, even though mathematically they contain the same amount of notes. In 3/4, the count is 1-2-3,1-2-3.Simple time. Thus, as you state, there would be 3 beats, each containing two quavers. Since 6/8 is compound time, it will be written out differently. It's basically two 'beats', each comprised of three quavers.So it's ...


1

I would do it differently. Eighth rest, eighth note tied to quarter note tied to half note. (I can't post graphics easily.) The suggested pattern avoids breaking any "normal" divisions and makes sight reading easier.


5

There are actually four possibilities: IMHO all of these are acceptable, although I find the first one easiest to read. The third one looks unneccessarily complicated and the fourth looks a bit 'unusual', but would probably be a good choice if there was half a page of this rhythm.


2

Not sure if this will satisfy the "good music" requirement... ...Yesterday by The Beatles famously has a seven bar phrase length. "Examples" is plural, so at least one more... ...Eleanor Rigby by The Beatles uses a five bar phrase length. Notice that both examples are phrase lengths of uneven counts in common time. It's not part of the question, but ...


0

Moonlight In Vermont has a 6 bar A section. Also many popular songs (I Got Rhythm for instance) have a 2 bar "tag" towards the end which breaks up the usual 4 bar thing a bit.


0

Las ketchup's "Aserejé", which has been a super-mega-hit back in the early 00s, does runs of six measures during the chorus. Not sure if this qualifies as "good music", but surely is a non overtly experimental thing, and people found it enjoyable back then.


2

It's not clear whether you mean to exclude all classical music or only classical music that employs irregular meter. In case it is the latter, I offer this example: There is a lovely trio sonata by Buxtehude (opus 1, number 4) whose first movement is a chaconne built on a three and a half measure long bass.


0

This is a typical 2/4 time rhythm: the 8/16 are grouped 212111 but you can hear as well the 332 rhythm. If you can play it you actually don't need to count it. But you want analyze it ... so first do this exercise: counting the 8th notes 1 _ 2 _ 3 _ 4 _ => Da _ Da _ Da _ Da _ etc. the 8th notes you count: one two three four (or singing Da) the 16th ...


3

When trying to count in music, it's worth slowing it all down. On guitar, life's a bit easier, particularly with rhythms. Here, you are strumming basically down, up, then down again, then up again, etc. Let's face it, in order to do the next downstrum, it needs the hand to come up again! A lot of rhythms start with a downstrum on beat 1. You do it here. ...


2

It's a fairly brisk 4/4, and the rhythm is Q-EQ-EEE 1+2+3+4+ (Q for quarter notes, E for eight notes). So I'd count One-TwoAnd-andFourAnd. I don't hear any swing in the way you play it.


0

My method when recording: Play the song using your recording sofware(DAW) in a simple 4/4 measure straight through. When you feel the tempo is not right adjust it until it feels right. It's ok if it's all sounding sloppy at this point as long as your changes are where they need to be. Adjust your metronome tempo at the parts you have changes if needed. In ...


0

Yes, but differentiating between tempos should not be the basis for a good musicianship. A musician is a human so even though he or she keeps a consistent tempo when playing, the tempo is not 100% accurate and should not be. Computers are made for that. The best grooves come from musicians whose tempo includes those micro-changes (that are existent all the ...


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