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It's worth looking at a book on musical form. There are lots of levels that form can be analysed on, from "motifs" (small musical phrases of just a few notes) up to whole sections that last several minutes each. In this case, the dominant pattern does indeed seem to be the rhythmic phrase that consists of 5 bars followed by 4 bars (of 3/4). Although the ...


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I think the term to apply is strophic, meaning the same music is used for all verses.


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Because these answers are coming from a "music theory" perspective, rather than an audiation perspective, my hope is that this response adds clarity. Music moves in 2s, 3s, or a combination of 2s and 3s. That's it. Note that I wrote "moves," as the basis for rhythm is movement. "Time signatures" do not have the same meaning that they did when first used, ...


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Hi and welcome to the music stack exchange. The term that best describes the phenomenon to which your question refers is misinterpretation. Examining the songs that you reference, both the beat and the tempo are fairly straightforward... There is nothing out of the ordinary as far as how the beat or tempo can be quantified; at least according to music ...


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In trying to interpret this question, I think partly it's asking whether there exists detailed music theory of rhythm, beyond just the basics of rhythmic notation and meter that one would encounter in a class on the fundamentals of music. And yes, there is a huge amount of scholarship out there about various theories of rhythm and meter (some of which dates ...


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I'd consider the equivalent of the tonic in rhythm to be the downbeat, or 1's and 3's. In terms of resolution, 2's and 4's lead to 3's and 1's, and syncopated rhythms in general lead to the next major beat. There are also grace notes in the form of the flam/drag rudiments which are single and doubled grace notes before an accented or normal-volume note, ...


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This is simply a rhythmic progression with a varied meter. Directly from the article that Albrecht Hugli references in the comments: There is a varied meter (metre in UK) in this poem, a mix of trochee and iamb with anapaest. The underlying beat in some lines is iambic, the well known da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM beat, the most common in English poetry... ...


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That's almost correct. The flags on the first note on the third quarter of the first bar should go to the right, and if it's supposed to be a 16th note (it's hard to decipher) there's no need for a dot on the rest immediately after. The second bar would be easier to read if you combined the two 16th rests into one 8th rest.


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If you mean the rhythmic accompaniment of the right hand: On certain beats, instead of a full strum of the strings, we mute all the strings with our strumming hand, and simply run the pick across the dead strings, creating a "blip" kind of sound. This sound creates a very pleasing rhythmic contrast to the rest of the strums, which carry a full tone. The ...


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