25 votes
Accepted

Difference between a ride and a crash/ride cymbal

At the risk of covering something you may already know well, let's take a detour and be clear about what crash and ride cymbals are and how they are different. Then the explanation of what a crash/...
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  • 50.9k
9 votes

How do i differentiate a crash cymbal from a ride cymbal which looks so similar

The purist, jazz drummer in me will tell you there is no difference. You can place a cymbal wherever you want and play it however you want regardless of what word the manufacturer decided to print on ...
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  • 309
4 votes
Accepted

Adding cristality to ride and hats

I generally use EQ to boost the frequency ranges that I want and drop the volume on the hi-hat channel to suit. The key frequencies I use for tweaking hi-hats are: 200 to 300 Hz - This is where the ...
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3 votes

Where are the bow, bell, and rim on a ride cymbal?

Wheat Williams has an excellent diagram for where the Bell, Bow, and Rim are. As for how/when they are typically played I will attempt to give some insight. Let's start with the bell: The bell is ...
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  • 309
2 votes

How do i differentiate a crash cymbal from a ride cymbal which looks so similar

To add to what's here: Ride cymbals will not be very loud when struck (comparitively), but will have overtones that last for much longer than crash cymbals. Crash cymbals, for the most part, are ...
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1 vote

What makes a cymbal "dry" or "wet"?

In general wet will have more sustain. Dry will be dark with a very fast decay. Simply put wet just rings more.
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1 vote
Accepted

Cleaning Up Zildjian Cymbal Stains

Cymbals use an alloy containing copper so they tarnish and corrode over time, even if they are not touched with sweaty fingers. Some drummers prefer tarnished cymbals, though I think it's more about (...
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  • 434

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