27

There are many aspects to hard rock singing, and each singer (hell, each song) has a different approach. I know that even death metal vocalists can do their scary vocals without doctoring them in the studio, and I know some really "clean"-sounding singers have to fix uo the tone in the studio. So it depends a lot. In hard rock, a lot of the "aggresiveness" ...


26

They are called "Stage monitors". Basically they are speakers so that the band members can hear themselves and their fellow musicians more clearly. When the stage is big, it is hard to listen to the amplifiers (both of your instrument and of the others), so the sound techs set up some of those monitors and the musicians can listen to what is being ...


23

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


23

There might be many different reasons for different bands. So I will be able to point just some possibilities. Studio recording and live performance are different ways to present the songs. Recordings are being listened to in a different way than live songs. Different techniques might be appropriate for each of them. In particular, at the end of the song the ...


16

There are two different ways this can be done: a) The band plays at a quieter and quieter dynamic level, until none of the players can be heard anymore (over the crowd etc. noise). There are a couple of problems with this: Playing quieter almost inevitably also changes other aspects of one's playing.What and how exactly depends on the instrument and the ...


16

Adding to the existing answers - monitor or foldback speakers - so-called because they literally fold the sound back to the band. Often, especially in open air gigs, the sound is fed to the audience through large p.a. speakers which are in front of the stage, therefore out of earshot of the players/vox. This results in the sound being lost to those on stage. ...


15

It depends, is the answer. And it also depends on what you call "distortion" - do you mean it in the sense that a guitarist would, or just that the sound is changed? Microphones are the first potential source of distortion. Sometimes you want a "smooth" mic, but sometimes you want one which puts a bit more "grit" inio the sound. Mics are fairly consistent ...


13

I have seen bands do fade-outs live, and I have played in bands that did fade-outs live. So it does happen. Exhibit A: Why does it not happen more often? It's hard to do convincingly, for one thing. The musicians will need to play softer and softer until they are essentially playing silently. Most electric instruments ...


11

They don't fade out in the studio. They keep playing in the studio. The engineer just slides the fader. Thus "fade out". A sound man can do that to a band, if the band has no acoustic drums and go thru D/I instead of amplifiers. Most bands hate playing like that, but sometimes that's what you can do. But no band wants to be controlled by the ...


10

The best way to start is by learning all of the Dylan songs you like. Transcribe them or if that's too hard at the beginning try to find transcriptions that other people have made. Once you have digested Dylan's harmonic language you'll probably come up with ideas to develop it in a different direction, and finally you'll develop you own personal voice.


9

The second chord is a chromatic passing chord: the bass line is descending (A -> G#) whereas the top line is ascending (A -> B). It doesn't really have a name which describes it properly (CaugMaj7 is a possibility as is Eaug). The third chord is a true C with G in the bass, so again the bass descends (G# -> G) and the top ascends (B -> C). So, viewing the ...


9

It's trivially easy to play a fade-out 'live', particularly if everything is going through a mixing desk. We don't do it, because the audience need an ending so they know when to applaud. Audiences LIKE to applaud a song. They feel cheated if they're not given an opportunity. When a well-known song ends on a fade, backing tracks made for cabaret singers ...


8

This is a portion of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. The poster is titled "Sony Tape. Full Color Sound" (1979), by Milton Glaser (Wikipedia). You can see a complete image at Milton Glaser Studio. To identify it, I was able to see in the lower of the two systems that all instruments in the first two measures appeared to have the same "fate motif&...


7

The "gritty" sound in rock singer's voices is their natural voice, albeit a technique that gives the sense of screaming or growling. Something else that should be considered is that there are many hard-rock style singers who are smokers, which can significantly affect a singer's voice. Note: Increasing your risk for lung cancer is not worth it to achieve a ...


6

The Beatles' distinctive vocal sound was shaped largely by double-tracking, in which the singer would record himself twice, attempting to repeat the performance exactly as before. Later recordings used the equipment to accomplish a similar audio effect on only one recorded track: automatic double tracking. A similar, but scarier, effect is obtained in ...


6

Since the solid bass playing will stop during a bass solo, only coming back in during the last couple of bars, maybe, the drums often continue. That is to keep a rhythm going, sometimes even against what the bass is doing to solo. On occasions such as that, I may put stabs in, usually on beat 1 of every four or eight bars, or where there's a fundamental ...


6

I think it's a beautiful song, but it doesn't seem to stick to a key signature very well. I'm not sure where that happens. Here's some sheet music, and the whole thing stays in a single minor key. a) Would you consider this song atonal? No. It's one of the most tonal uses of a minor key in popular music I've actually seen recently. It's pretty much ...


6

First thing that comes to mind is that Dylan can go off the chords you'd expect in any key. First example is actually a song he covers but didn't write, "Baby Let Me Follow You Down". G F Baby let me follow you down C Eb Baby let me follow you down G D C D I'll do anything in ...


6

The I - III♭ chord progression in rock is so common, we could probably spend the rest of the year citing examples. It occurs in a certain metal song about some man made of the chemical element Fe, which evidently brings on the wrath of the record label, and take down notics if we were to even talk about it. So let's avoid all that. Let's get to the meat of ...


6

I don't think I have heard/read from musicians explaining why live fade outs aren't common, but I think you can come to a sensible answer by first asking why bands often play so loud? Of course they play loudly to be heard over the crowd noise. If the crowd is so noisy that the band plays loudly to begin with, then how will that effect a live fade out? When ...


6

Simple answer? Because humans make symbols. Because we associate the minor mode with all the things metal wants to stand for. Long answer? (Ok, you asked for it—) We’ve been conditioned by several centuries of Western tonal tradition to associate major mode with happiness, life, light, and positivity, and minor mode with sadness, death, darkness, and despair....


6

These are called monitors speakers or stage monitors or floor monitors in this case. In your picture there are more on either side of the stage). Monitors are speakers aimed at the performer to make sure they can hear what they need to hear. The typical example is the singer: With the loud drum and guitar amps on stage, they would not hear themselves ...


5

'Rock' is an umbrella term referring to an area of music containing many sub-genres that has been evolving for nearly 70 years now. Even at its birth, it evolved from multiple genres such as Country, Blues, and Boogie-Woogie piano music. As time has moved on it has taken in more and more influcences such as folk, classical, jazz... and ultimately, every ...


5

It's been in every rock song since the late 60s. Went out of favour in the 80s then came back with a vengeance with Madchester and Brit Pop, from 89 or so right through the 90s. In the version as scored in your OP, I think I must have played that in my first ever gig on drums… in 1973 ;) This is the earliest one that springs to mind. Mountain, Long Red, live ...


5

yet they are complex and mysterious and rich Um, no, not the first two. They're entirely appropriate to the song, which is the key part. That's not about chord progressions though - it's much more about fingerpicking and strumming patterns. This may lead to some effect of inversions if you look at the theory, but that only derives from standard picking ...


5

Those are stage monitors - basically, general-purpose loudspeakers with built-in amplifiers, designed to sit on the floor and be audible to people standing in front of them. Their purpose is for each musician to hear clearly and reliably what they and their bandmates are playing. Sometimes in big concerts, you can see a sound engineer standing at a mixer at ...


4

First, I suggest you study the organ playing of the keyboardists for classic rock bands, including: Deep Purple The Doors Boston Booker T. and the MG's Spencer Davis Group & Traffic (Steve Winwood playing B3 in both bands) Emerson, Lake, & Palmer A very few Led Zeppelin songs You might also check out some great B3 players who aren't exactly rock ...


4

The word also has a descriptive character and is not merely a historically appellation. The beat has a rocking feel because the even accents make it syncopated. From the Macmillan Dictionary: "syncopated sounds or movements emphasize the weak beats instead of the strong beats." The popular notion that TWO and FOUR are the strong, or accented beats is due to ...


4

A modal chord progression would just be a chord progression in whatever mode you are in. The following explains chords in each mode where an upper case Roman numeral is a major chord, a lower case Roman numeral is a minor chord, and a lower case Roman numeral followed by a 'o' is a diminished chord. A 7 next to a chord just means it has a dominat 7th(used ...


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