27

There are many aspects to hard rock singing, and each singer (hell, each song) has a different approach. I know that even death metal vocalists can do their scary vocals without doctoring them in the studio, and I know some really "clean"-sounding singers have to fix uo the tone in the studio. So it depends a lot. In hard rock, a lot of the "aggresiveness" ...


22

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


14

It depends, is the answer. And it also depends on what you call "distortion" - do you mean it in the sense that a guitarist would, or just that the sound is changed? Microphones are the first potential source of distortion. Sometimes you want a "smooth" mic, but sometimes you want one which puts a bit more "grit" inio the sound. Mics are fairly consistent ...


10

It actually goes back to the Medieval period when music that was not church music nor followed the church's rules was the devil's music. Madrigals were considered the devil's music because they were mostly about sex. Ending a piece on a minor chord was also forbidden which gave us the Piccardi third (raising the third of the final chord of a piece in a minor ...


9

The second chord is a chromatic passing chord: the bass line is descending (A -> G#) whereas the top line is ascending (A -> B). It doesn't really have a name which describes it properly (CaugMaj7 is a possibility as is Eaug). The third chord is a true C with G in the bass, so again the bass descends (G# -> G) and the top ascends (B -> C). So, viewing the ...


9

I think the progression of 2&4 accents in Western (American) popular music probably starts with Swing, Jazz, Big Band where the drummers emphasized these beats and played 2 & 4 with the High Hat. Next I think this moved over to the snare drum in very early Rock n' Roll and Blues. Once it was on the snare drum, virtually all styles of American ...


8

We have two legs, and so we tend to like rhythms which 'go into' two. We also tend to like tempos which match things we can do with our legs -- slower than a stroll hardly feels like a rhythm, faster than a sprint and we mentally recalibrate to half-tempo. By the same token, there are lots of actions like scrubbing or sawing that are naturally fall into ...


7

Can one make an objective, quantifiable distinction between Rock-n-roll and Rhythm-n-Blues? Short answer: No. Long Answer: Alan Freed's use of the term rock-n-roll in the 1950s is often considered definitive. He used the term to refer to R&B combos, black vocal groups, saxophonists, black blues singers, and white artists playing in the authentic R&...


7

This is really one of the most subjective areas in music, and one that individuals who follow a sub-genre get most militant about. In my opinion, the only real way to do this is by comparison with other songs/bands in a particular genre. There are exceptions, for example Industrial - which has well defined descriptions based around the use of industrial ...


6

The "gritty" sound in rock singer's voices is their natural voice, albeit a technique that gives the sense of screaming or growling. Something else that should be considered is that there are many hard-rock style singers who are smokers, which can significantly affect a singer's voice. Note: Increasing your risk for lung cancer is not worth it to achieve a ...


6

Since the solid bass playing will stop during a bass solo, only coming back in during the last couple of bars, maybe, the drums often continue. That is to keep a rhythm going, sometimes even against what the bass is doing to solo. On occasions such as that, I may put stabs in, usually on beat 1 of every four or eight bars, or where there's a fundamental ...


6

I think it's a beautiful song, but it doesn't seem to stick to a key signature very well. I'm not sure where that happens. Here's some sheet music, and the whole thing stays in a single minor key. a) Would you consider this song atonal? No. It's one of the most tonal uses of a minor key in popular music I've actually seen recently. It's pretty much ...


5

It sounds like you are approaching this from a very analytical perspective, which will ultimately leave your music soulless and no more than an analytical exercise. Music is not analysis. Music is feeling. Guitar can be played by inputting visual patterns and by having your analytical mind guide your note choice. Or it can be played where the player ...


5

The Beatles' distinctive vocal sound was shaped largely by double-tracking, in which the singer would record himself twice, attempting to repeat the performance exactly as before. Later recordings used the equipment to accomplish a similar audio effect on only one recorded track: automatic double tracking. A similar, but scarier, effect is obtained in ...


5

'Rock' is an umbrella term referring to an area of music containing many sub-genres that has been evolving for nearly 70 years now. Even at its birth, it evolved from multiple genres such as Country, Blues, and Boogie-Woogie piano music. As time has moved on it has taken in more and more influcences such as folk, classical, jazz... and ultimately, every ...


5

In one sense the questions are "clear" (as you say) but in a more important sense any answers are somewhere between misguided and irrelevant. Looking at a collection of musical works and identifying some common characteristics of them is what musicologists do for a living, and if what they find is something that a typical listener can actually follow just ...


4

The first thing that comes to mind is «backmasked» messages (i. e. hidden by the means of recording it backwards) with sinister and supposedly satanic contents: http://www.religioustolerance.org/chr_cul5.htm http://www.nauglefest.net/backmask.htm The best example of such message is the classic passage from reversed «Stairway to Heaven»: "All yours, ...


4

Replying to Michael Thibodeau: I would love to see any reference to non-church music being called the devil's music during the medieval period that cites medieval sources. I've been working on medieval music history for quite some time and never seen any reference to any of this history. The reference to the tritone being the devil's interval can't be traced ...


4

A modal chord progression would just be a chord progression in whatever mode you are in. The following explains chords in each mode where an upper case Roman numeral is a major chord, a lower case Roman numeral is a minor chord, and a lower case Roman numeral followed by a 'o' is a diminished chord. A 7 next to a chord just means it has a dominat 7th(used ...


4

First, I suggest you study the organ playing of the keyboardists for classic rock bands, including: Deep Purple The Doors Boston Booker T. and the MG's Spencer Davis Group & Traffic (Steve Winwood playing B3 in both bands) Emerson, Lake, & Palmer A very few Led Zeppelin songs You might also check out some great B3 players who aren't exactly rock ...


4

Major chords, minor chords, dominant 7th chords, and "power" chords (perfect fifth intervals). There are certainly some tunes that use suspended chords (Pinball Wizard), major sevenths (25 or 6 to 4), minor sevenths (Black Magic Woman), 7#9 chords (Purple Haze), and others, but for the most part rock music is harmonically pretty simple.


4

First of all the I IV V is also very common in Classical music, not just rock and other modern pop genres. It is a very old progression that I see in pre-classical era music. From a chord substitution perspective the ii is (relatively speaking) the relative minor of the IV, as the iii is to the V, and the vi to the I. So in a very real sense ii-7 --> V7 -->...


3

The word also has a descriptive character and is not merely a historically appellation. The beat has a rocking feel because the even accents make it syncopated. From the Macmillan Dictionary: "syncopated sounds or movements emphasize the weak beats instead of the strong beats." The popular notion that TWO and FOUR are the strong, or accented beats is due to ...


3

Note that in rock/pop music, not all the modes are used equally. The modes that are used most often are: ionian (major) aeolian (natural minor) dorian mixolydian So if you are just starting with modes, I would recommend you concentrate on these ones first. Generalizing to the other modes will be easy once you've understood the basics. Let me now give you ...


3

A strong, steady pulse makes a kind of very stable skeleton for the music. If it's there, you can do other things without completely breaking the style or making the piece incoherent. Compare it to this: Play a strong, continuous low note. You can play almost anything on top of it and the music still seems to be "calm" and rooted in a way. Play a strong, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible