15 votes
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Roman numeral notation for a suspended chord?

Typically, in traditional classical music, non-harmonic tones like suspensions are not indicated in the Roman numeral analysis. You would simply notate the numeral and inversion for the chord to ...
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14 votes
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Chord exceptions in City of New Orleans

The chords you've listed in your table are what we call the diatonic triads of a key. "Diatonic" basically just means "within the key," so the diatonic triads are what are created when we only use the ...
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13 votes
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Harmonic analysis of the B section of "Have You Met Miss Jones"

That's Coltrane changes (before Coltrane actually used them in Giant Steps etc.), where the roots of the tonal centers move in (enharmonic) major thirds (either up or down): [Bb] -> (down M3) [Gb] ...
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13 votes
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Does the flat (b) in bIII flatten all the notes?

The only thing the flat symbolizes is the root is lowered by a half step. So in C, a III would be built off of an E while the bIII would be built off of an Eb. From there, you build the chord based ...
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13 votes

Should I use uppercase or lowercase roman numerals in Jazz harmonic analysis?

Having looked at many analyzed scores, I find the lower case for minor and diminished and upper case for major and augmented much easier to read. The most common places I found hard to read were in ...
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13 votes
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Is it really necessary to learn the Number System in Music?

As a bassist who has played predominantly jazz for decades I can say understanding and being comfortable with the number system is necessary if you want to progress to be an advanced player. Here are ...
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Analyzing an unfamiliar Roman numeral analysis: Cm/G-G notated as V6/4-5/3?

That's my answer; neat! This is a contentious issue for musicians. You're right that beat 3 is a i chord in second inversion; it has C–E♭–G, obviously a C-minor chord, and that should be i! But let'...
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What is the difference between the bIII and III chord in a minor scale?

If one is in a major key, then III is a major chord build on scale step 3. An example is in C major, the III is an E major chord, E-G♯-B (in some order.) The symbol ♭III in C major is an E♭ major ...
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12 votes

Should I use uppercase or lowercase roman numerals in Jazz harmonic analysis?

As long as you use the two systems with the degree of specificity that you've done in your question, it ultimately won't matter, because they tell you the exact same thing. As you've mentioned, major/...
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11 votes
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How do I determine the chord progression Roman numerals?

The other chords get Roman numerals based on the key you are in. For example in the key of D major you would have the following Roman numerals map to the following chords: D Em F#m G A Bm C#...
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Before the advent of Roman-numeral analysis, did musicians conceptualize applied/secondary chords as somehow moving towards their temporary tonics?

From what I've read on the history of western harmony (there's a good Cambridge Press book about the subject), these were viewed as temporary key changes. These modulations were driven by chromatic ...
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10 votes

Is it possible to know the exact chord from the roman numerals

The only thing about the distribution of voices that Roman numeral analysis provides is which voice is in the bass. Just some background on the symbols... The Arabic numerals added to Roman numerals ...
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Alternative Analysis for Non-Functioning Secondary Dominants

I agree, these are somewhat dubious designations, but there's a possible justification for looking at them more or less as analyzed in your example, in increasing order of dubiousness. The first ...
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9 votes

Harmony and roman numeral analysis: how to deal with chromaticism?

The term for chord connections like this, where each note of the chords changes (usually chromatically, almost always step-wise) one-by-one, is linear harmony. It's quite common in Liszt, Scubert, ...
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Roman numeral chord notation in minor scale?

Roman Numeral analysis requires the key of what you are analyzing to make any sense. Based on the key you can handle any basic progression. If you are in A minor, everything you are doing is centered ...
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What does this arrow mean in the chord annotations?

Just a quick answer: that seems to indicate a secondary dominant ("five-seven of four"). I believe it is more common to show them with a slash, e.g., V7/IV. Check out this question --- What is a ...
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9 votes
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Roman Numeral Analysis - Tonicization of relative major key in minor key

I recommend trying to clearly show the functional role of each chord with your labels. So for this example, you have two options: VII7–III V7/III–III The first option is not wrong, but it doesn't ...
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8 votes
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What does the roman numeral notation mean for this borrowed chord?

Ok. This is what it means. In your example, BVII6 As all of you have pointed out, B stands for "barre". It can be also a C, which stands for "cejilla" (the Spanish for "barre"). The roman number ...
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How to name a b7 chord

As is often the case for harmonic analysis: context is key. Especially true I feel when looking at postwar popular music, in which harmonic conventions vary a lot between period, genre and composer, ...
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8 votes
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Origin of Roman Numeral Analysis

To start off, here are some quotes from The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory: To designate the scale-degree placement of these chords, Vogler introduced roman numeral designations. ...
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Is it possible to know the exact chord from the roman numerals

Where you play the notes - in which ocatve, or even how they split - root in bass and others in r.h., or split them two with each, etc., is very much up to you, as the player. It's called voicing, and ...
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8 votes

Do incomplete chords get roman numerals in harmonic analysis?

No, not all three notes of a triad must be present for it to be given a Roman numeral. Common practice requires at least two pitches to be present to recognize it as a triad: the root, so that we know ...
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7 votes

Roman numeral notation for a suspended chord?

If I'm not mistaken, the way to symbolize this is: IVsus or IVsus4 (or IVsus4). (Usually, when you see a IVsus chord, it refers to a sus4 chord, but not everyone writes it this way).
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7 votes

Is there more than one use for Roman Numerals in music notation?

Roman numerals can be used for aspects of instrumental notation, which are for performance, rather than analytical purposes. For instance, Roman numerals are used to denote: positions in classical ...
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What is a roman numeral analysis of the chords from Coldplay's "God put a smile upon your face"?

In some cases, Roman numerals aren't all that helpful, and this piece might be one of them. In my opinion, Section A is best understood by considering two simultaneous actions: The chromatic descent ...
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7 votes
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Roman Numeral Treatment of Suspensions

Actually, without seeing the preceding measure, there are quite a couple of things that might be going on in your first example (as @replete noted in the comments). D is a non-chord tone and it could ...
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7 votes
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Do Roman Numerals for a chord progressions change capitalization when played in a different key than the original?

The quality of the chords given by upper/lower case hints at the mode, major or minor. I ii iii a major chord on the first scale degree, and two minor chords and the second and third degrees fits the ...
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7 votes

What is this lead-sheet chord?

It's definitely a real chord! The Roman numerals indicate the root of the chord, and the Arabic numerals next to it tell us the inversion; we call these latter numbers "figured bass." A &...
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