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If you analyse the chords as if the song were C major (the relative major), it would read as: |Am / / / |C / / / |G / / / |Am / G / | |vi / / / |I / / / |V / / / |vi / V / | (as opposed to being in Am): |Am / / / |C / / / |G / / / |Am / G / | |i / / / |III / / / |VII / / / |i / VII / | Looking at this, it is obvious why the progression works - it ...


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I think "Why does this chord progression work" is a bit misguided question to begin with. I guess you're really asking for ways to see the chords so that you can relate their functions here to other chord progressions and songs you're familiar with. Albrecht already basically said it - why does anything "work", the chords are triads built on scale degrees ...


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Lasomiso,latidore,misoso... a,g,e,g, a,b,c,d, e,g,g ... The tune is in the aeolian mode and your analysis is correct (chords and R.N.) why it works? For the same reason that any other progression works. Why shouldn’t C,dm,em not work? Why works I IV V I or I vi ii V? These are all degrees and triads of a same key and mode. They work. Edit: Of course G (...


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it is noted that the key signature is D major If you mean the song by Simon and Garfunkel the signature of D major would be 2 sharps (F#,C#) and it must be in E-dorian, and the C# would be the major 6th of dorian. That means we have a major IV (A) like Richard says. Most images (sheet music) I found are in minor (looking like aeolian) with an additional ...


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You can use them exactly how you would use them in a major or a minor key. Your starting point (degree 1) is going to be different and will be the tonic of your mode. Aside from that, the only things that change are the numerals' case and the application of diminished or augmentations marks where appropriate. So, if you're doing 1, 2, 5, 1 in Lydian for ...


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The key signature here seems to be a red herring - and inaccurate. If the tonic is indeed D, then it may well be that the key sig. ought to be that of the parent key - C (No ♯/♭). And that doesn't dictate the tonic is C. The tonic is the note/chord where a piece appears to be at rest, at home. So, in this case, D. Dorian is a minor key (with m3),...


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Roman-numeral notation is relatively standard, and to determine any given Roman numeral you need two things: The scale degree of the root of the chord. (This demands knowing what tonic is.) The quality of that chord. Thus it doesn't matter what mode you're in, only what tonic is. If you're in E Dorian, E is tonic, and therefore an A chord is built on scale-...


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There is not one absolute standard. But Kostka/Payne's system in Tonal Harmony will allow you to write a unambiguous symbol for any of the four triad types (major, minor, diminished, augmented) on all twelve possible roots within any major or minor key signature. It will also handle diatonic seventh chords and at least a large variety of non-diatonic seventh ...


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Excellent question! Unfortunately, there does not appear to be a universal standard within the musical community at large. Even looking around this site will give varying systems of notation. However, allow me to provide an argument for the system I prefer: I tend to favor the system labelled above as "traditional" (defining every symbol relative to the ...


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There isn't a 'general standard'. Hence the confusion. I prefer the system ('traditional' according to Wikipedia) where scale degrees are related to the major scale and minor/major chords are lower/upper-case. Minor or major dominant chords are v or V respectively. (Does a 'natural minor' v deserve the functional label 'dominant' anyway?) But the other ...


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'How do you notate melody notes?' Well, I certainly don't use Roman numerals. They are kept for harmony and chords only. I might use Arabic numbers, with approriate sharps or flats before (or after) them. I might use solfege, whiich works well in movable doh, where doh is the root of the key. I might use fixed doh, where doh is C always. This can become ...


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Circumflex to indicate scale degree. But also, if the music is homophonic, label non chord tones. To the extent the music exhibits motifs, label those and their variations, along with inversion and retrograde. Not all music uses those devices, so label only if appropriate. I think labeling cadences, phrase ending types is helpful too. That brings in harmonic ...


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Lots of harmony books use numbers with a circumflex accent. It's sometimes not so simple to type. Then the circumflex is prefixed. Tonic note is ^1 and the dominant ^5, etc. Flats and sharps are prefixed meaning raise or lower within the context of the scale. I find it a bit clumsy as no tempo indication is given. While harmonies may remain for a measure ...


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