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6

I've worried about this same thing in the past. Unless the symptoms are unbearable you should be able to make some simple adjustments and avoid further harm. The easiest way to describe the most gentle picking hand position is to straighten your wrist so it isn't bent at all and then position your guitar in such a way that the strings end up in the proper ...


3

What you are experiencing could be what I would call an overuse injury caused by repetitive stress to muscles, tendons and joints without adequate rest for recovery. Many athletes experience this type of injury and it is often exacerbated by using improper form. But even if using proper form, continual stress without adequate recovery time can lead to a ...


3

Guitar playing is a physical activity that involves muscles and varying degrees of tension. Provided that all things are equal: a) your posture is correct or relaxed (ie. not slouching or twisted) b) the instrument is comfortable and easy to play (eg. low action compared to high) c) the combination of your posture and instrument is correct (ie. you've not ...


2

I agree with all of the answers that have been posted here. I would also stress the importance of learning to use your larger muscle groups whenever possible. A lot of the time, when employing certain techniques, we wind up over-using our wrists and forearms when larger muscle groups, like the bicep-area, are perfectly suited to take over and relieve the ...


2

What to do while you're not playing I agree with the other answers that you should probably rest your hands for at least 2 weeks, then take it slow. 15 min first day, 30 min second day, no more than an hour for the first week or so of playing. If there's no pain, then you can relax these restraints. But this doesn't mean you should stop practicing! Now is ...


1

Which arm? Picking or fretting hand? I see you say classical. The strain may be due to a change in position, especially if you mostly play electric then tried acoustic (classical) for the first time. I can't tell from your post if you are mainly a professional classical guitarist or like I said a guitarist who started classical recently. I fall into ...


1

As a drummer I had some pretty severe tendinitis in my wrists and found that changing the height of a few drums and my throne forced me to sit with better posture and this help tremendously. I also changed the way I was gripping my sticks. This may be completely different for your situation but some things that you may be able to try: Get a teacher to take ...


1

Look back on times when you may have had a trauma inflicted on your hands or fingers. It will come back in the later years of your life . playing guitar actually after I get the stiffness out is a great way to keep the fingers from succumbing to the affects of arthritis. I find after doing a few stretching exercises with the fingers and using DMSO ( horse ...


1

I don't agree. I also recently started playing guitar excessively without engaging in any other activity and I am also struggling with stiff fingers (especially in the first ligament of my index and ring finger). This mainly due to the new song I'm practicing containing "unfimiliar" chords like Gm, Cm, Bm.


1

BS! You cannot get stiff fingers in any sort of way from playing guitar, it's the exact opposite. When you start playing guitar, your tendants start to become more elestic, your muscles obtain more control and you are able to control your fingers accurately without any problem. Rock climbing on the other hand forces the muscles to become tougher, less ...


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