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5

I can hear the extra sa ni in the example he plays, but he makes it sound more like an ornament. When he sings the example the notes sound much more deliberate. In my experience when musicians are both playing and talking in a video it's much better to orientate yourself to what they are playing rather than what they are saying (or singing).


4

The other answer by @SoulEater asserts that the numbers refer to the octave of the note. This is incorrect, so I am adding my own answer here to address the OP's question. The sapta swarās, namely Sa, Ri (or Re), Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha and Ni, are employed in a 12-note system in Hindustani music and in a 16-note system in Carnatic system. In Hindustani music, ...


4

One reason for your struggle is that Dave Harsh is singing the swaras incorrectly at many points. You are correct that at 7:06 the last dha should be a ga (however I do hear Dave say ga and not dha). You are also correct that at 7:36 ga sa re is incorrect. Dave is not notating the music accurately here, causing your confusion. Even based on a cursory ...


2

You are partly correct. It is right that the song is in the mandara (lower) and madhya (middle) sthayis (octaves), whereas the notation incorrectly places all the swaras (notes) in the middle octave. However, not every dhaivatam and panchamam in the given notation should be played in the lower octave. Only those that correspond to the lines "O Re Piya ...


2

Ultimately much base of all instrumental music is also came from "gayaki ang", so its a good practice, also you can practice words when practicing with bansuri, it will help you to make "bansuri sing" rather then to make "bansuri play".


2

First of all, I have to tell you that I'm for sure not an expert at Bansuri's :P However, when you say that ~ is transitioning between two notes, it's basically legato. So you just want to go from one note into the other. You can achieve this by covering the holes slowly. Just watch this video from the point I set it to. First he plays the notes by covering ...


2

I'm not sure what you mean by 'balancing'. I assume you mean ensuring that both notes have the same tone quality and dynamics, and that you get a smooth transition between them. Yes, that's 420 pairs of notes to consider, but only very few of them will be difficult. Ignore the easy ones (revisit them later) and concentrate on the difficult ones. Do all ...


1

Hindustani musicians name pitches using a system called Sargam, the equivalent of the Western movable do solfege: Sa (ṣaḍja षड्ज) = Do Re (Rishabh ऋषभ) = Re Ga (Gandhār गान्धार) = Mi Ma (Madhyam मध्यम) = Fa Pa (Pancham पञ्चम) = So Dha (Dhaivat धैवत) = La Ni (Nishād निषाद) = Ti Sa (ṣaḍja षड्ज) = Do Both systems repeat at the octave. The difference between ...


1

Shifting the scale like this won't really work on a Bansuri, and even more generally for a composition that is raga based. This is because the relative pitches of successive notes are not the same, or in other words Indian classical music does not use an equal tempered scale. You could try shifting the notes and playing the song, but it will sound slightly ...


1

It is definitely a good idea to practice singing even while learning to play the Bansuri. One advantage is that it gives you another way to internalise the positions of the notes (swaras), the form of the oscillations (gamakas), etc. It helps build a solid grounding when you have more than one method or tool to master the basics. The different forms of ...


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