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11

That seems just a poorly written arrangement, with wrong keys, chords, notes and transposition. The song is indeed in F minor, so it should have 4 flats, and since the melody is written for Alto sax, that part should be written in D minor (one flat). Also, the second bar should be Ab and the third Db. The reason for that (wrong) transposition is that songs ...


8

TL;DR (the specific answer) Your voice part's key signature has one flat. The corresponding alto saxophone key signature will have two sharps. The general answer Voice is written in what is called "concert pitch". Concert pitch means that when you write an "A" (specifically, the "A" above "middle C") it is tuned to ...


8

There are different EWI fingerings but the general idea is that standard saxophone fingerings will work, and some other that are not working on a real sax will also work. In my experience, palm keys for the right hand will move the output a certain number of semi tones higher or lower on every notes whereas it only works for some on a real sax. For instance, ...


8

It's a "scoop" or "slide". It means you bend into the note, starting a bit flat and then bending the note upward until it's in tune.


7

This effect is usually called a "growl". There are two techniques (as explained in the linked video). The one in "Shotgun" is most likely the "'growl' in the back of your throat while playing" technique. The other technique is to hum while playing. When humming, the more consonant the hummed and played pitches, the smoother the ...


7

The alto sax part needs to be written in the key of D Major (2 sharps). The alto transposes, and It's sounding pitch is a major sixth below its written pitch. When the vocals sing do-re-mi in F (notes F-G-A), the alto player must see this in D. He/she will read D-E-F# and they will sound in F major. To verify this, look at any concert band score. The ...


3

How old is the instrument? A440 was only adopted in 1939 and although older instruments can play in tune to an ensemble tuned to A440, or in actual practice in most high schools, Bb, 233 hz, the fact is that they can sound "pitchy". Correcting this is a bit more complicated than just tuning the instrument with the lead pipe. You have to have ears ...


3

I'd say these are mordents, since they start and return to the same note. The audio example is closest to the first group in the picture. However, jazz has so many quick patterns that it might just be better to call them grace notes:


3

One of the terms is "lower neighbor." This is a bit more general than terms as the lower neighbor need not be just an ornament. It's a non-chord tone played (usually a half-step) below the main tone. A mordent is the main note, a neighbor (upper or lower), and the main note again. ("Mordent" is used for one and "inverted mordent"...


2

Assuming your instrument is in good condition, I'm pretty sure it's the embouchure. One important thing to remember is that no matter how you do voicing and tone imagining etc., finally it all comes down to five basic physical aspects which together decide the tone 1. point of contact between lower lip (jaw) and the reed 2. the amount of pressure you're ...


2

Welp... the string quartet is by definition four mainly non-chordal instruments, and there's the Turtle Island String Quartet. They recorded a lot of standards (I think they have a whole album of Coltrane), and since they were the "cool kids" to string students in the 90s-2000s, many of their transcriptions are published. However, that might have ...


2

The classical term is "mordents" but jazz musicians usually call these embellishments "turns". Often the higher note, is a semitone higher than the main, and the following note one step lower, but there are other possible constellations.


2

The pad that the G# key operates is normally closed. That's the way the instrument is designed. You have to depress the G# key to open that hole.


1

I am also a self-taught alto sax player and agree with the above. I had to hold my saxophone further away from my chest. By loosening the neck strap a bit, I could hold less of the mouthpiece between my lips and play more quietly. In my case, it wasn't about the strength of the reed, but only about the neck strap


1

There could be several reasons your playing doesn't sound right: the music you downloaded might have mistakes. the music you have might not be transposed for tenor sax. The notes need to be transposed a whole tone higher. The key signature will have two more sharps (or two less flats). You might not be playing the notes correctly. there might be something ...


1

It has been known that stuff on the 'net isn't always accurate! There's also the possibility you haven't taken the key signature into account. There's also the possibility that it's your own mistakes, touching the wrong keys on the sax. Answering the header directly - you look at the key signature - the sharps or flats at the beginning of each line, and ...


1

Totally agree with Laurence. Listen very carefully to what it is you wish to play, establish its key, and either listen and play each note/phrase, or write down what you think it is. Referring to sax or piano whenever possible. That way, which won't come easily, will make you a better player and musician. Absolute pitch is entirely not needed, and you could ...


1

Better still, write the notes yourself! Perfect pitch isn't required, just the perfectly normal musical skill of Relative Pitch - check the first note against a piano (or against your sax) - heck, check EVERY note until you get into practice! - and work from there. Also, just listen and play. Sure, there'll be some trial-and-error. Off you go!


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