44

This question has been asked many times and various reason have been proposed: The saxophone is too loud or doesn't blend There are numerous recordings proving that the saxophone in the hands of a good player can play extremely quietly and blend anywhere. There was a cartel of French instrument makers who wanted to protect their market and hindered ...


7

I think the reasons are economic rather than musical. I don't really buy the argument that it was "invented too late", because it's just 11 years younger than the tuba (1846 vs 1835). And composers did start using it pretty early on - there are pieces by Bizet, Delibes, and others who included the sax. But composers didn't really start considering the sax ...


6

If it works for you, keep on doing it. The only issue you might run into is if you get a new horn or mouthpiece that requires more consistent use of the octave key, you'll need to develop the habit of pressing it. How easy is it to play low notes on your sax? It's possible that you're easily getting the higher octave out due to a small leak in the upper ...


4

What instrument do you play? What is the reed strength? If you are a beginner, you should stick to 1-1.5 reed strength (2 on the alto would be fine too). Is the instrument new or used? If used, when was it checked/repaired last? Saxophones are notorious for having a poor low end and a big difference between middle C and middle D. I have a professional-level ...


4

First of all, I strongly disagree with your teacher about using the key. The key is there for a reason: to make it much easier to produce the desired pitches. Now, it is certainly true on most if not all wind instruments that you can "overblow" to produce the upper register sans octave key. I had a couple teachers (clarinet) who recommended this as an ...


3

The connection is useful if you are playing combinations like C♯-G♯: you can leave your left hand fourth finger on the C♯ key and you only need to move the right hand fingers. The same for the combinations B-G♯ and B♭-G♯.


3

I think it is good for practice to not use the octave key for certain passages, you learn how to voice the notes better and makes some transitions smoother in my opinion, this works for me on clarinet and saxophone as well. Properly using he register key will deliver the best sound and pitch without any doubt, that is how the instrument is designed, there ...


2

My Take the Sax is would be easier choice you can work around the embouchure. I play both the clarinet and saxophone (Alto and Tenor) I struggled on the tenor for a few months due to the less firm embouchure needed on the Tenor Sax. but today the tenor is my first choice instrument... Fingering is also much easier on the sax compared to the clarinet


2

With no keys pressed you should be producing a C#2. A C#3 should only come out if you are pressing the octave key. If the note is jumping between C#2 and C#3 you are you are biting too hard or doing something else wrong, or your instrument is leaking. It's impossible to tell without seeing you play. Here's a link to a good introduction to the saxophone ...


2

Honestly, the one you like most. They all have up and down sides. Play what you like the sound and personality of the most.


2

Basic transpositions for sax,l trumpet etc Bb instruments (Bb clarinet, tenor/soprano sax, trumpet ...) Up one tone. C => D, F => G etc Eb instruments (alto/baritone sax) Down 3 semitones. C => A, F => D etc Players of transposing instruments need to know these by heart (and being able to do simple transposition more or less by sight is also ...


2

If you mean that your written sax music will be in A, then you are not changing the key, as it would still sound in C. If you mean you want the song to sound in A, then that would put your sax part into 6 sharps!


1

As it turns out, it came from what I think is the high F key (I've never actually used it before)? I went back to where I was practicing and found a small rod-like piece on the floor that I hadn’t noticed before. So, it looks like the screw actually came loose from a rod that connects the high F button to a lever above it. Got it all fixed now!


1

Yes, the screws around that size are usually key guard screws. It may also be a lyre holder screw if your model has one. Look on your key guards for a matching screw head and then look for open holes. https://www.votawtool.com/key-guard-screw-large.html


1

In the case of clarinets, at least, the use of cork is preferable (yeah, I know, opinion; but this is the view of all my teachers and most colleagues) because not only is it easily adjusted (sand it down if too high) but it provides a nice solid stop. Felt or equivalent can make the keys have a "squishy" feel -- and of course is not applicable where the ...


1

Felt bumpers are often quieter than cork, but other than that there is no reason you can't use cork (or any other material with similar properties e.g. foam rubber). You don't have to buy cork: you can use the cork from a wine bottle. You don't need to replace the felts just because they look bad.


1

I know that to transpose I play 3 half steps up from the note she plays on the sax. What I'm looking for help with is when she plays a minor scale ... Well, if there is a trick behind this question I give this second tricky answer: As your daughter wants to improvise and you are asking for some chord progression and you say you know the difference of the ...


1

The whole point of transposing instruments is that they, well, transpose. A B♭ sax is so-called because when the player sees a note, and plays it, it comes out a tone below what is written. In order to compensate for this, the music needs to be written one tone higher than what would be played. So in your case, for the sax player to produce a C note, ...


1

First of all, there are sax mutes which are basically small plush pillows to jam into the horn. However, the proper answer is, you guessed it: practice, practice, practice. It does take a lot of strength and training to play almost any wind instrument pp and maintain good tone. One other mechanical thing to try: get a plastic or rubber mouthpiece ...


1

Here's the quick dodge for transpositions (as long as you know your key signatures!) E♭ baritone has three 'built-in' flats. It's 'in E♭' after all! So, to play music for an instrument 'in C' (i.e. normal untransposed piano, no 'built-in' flats or sharps) we have to take away those three flats. Which is the same as adding three sharps. So ...


1

It seems from your question that you want to play a song in C major on your baritone sax so you can play it in the same key as any accompanying instruments (that is, in "concert pitch"). To do that, you have correctly identified that you will be playing in the key of A major. You can do this at sight by imagining that the treble staff's bottom line isn't ...


1

Saxophone are transposing instruments: Your instrument is called Eb-Sax because it plays an Eb when you play a written C. This means it transposes a minor 3rd up (and as a Bariton an 8ve down!) So you have to notate and play an A on your instrument when you want to hear C. (your instrument will transpose the A a minor 3rd up ...)


1

I would say Saxophone is the easiest instrument I have learned but the hardest to get a good sound on. The fingerings are easier than clarinet and the embouchure is easier than flute. The fingerings on saxophone are very similar to recorder (and flute) so they are very easy. Just try to get lessons if you can to avoid any mistakes while learning. Also alto ...


1

Among woodwinds, clarinet and flute have the most varied repertoire. Much more than oboe, subcontrabassoon, ocarina, etc. Flute embouchure may be more foreign to you than the clarinet's. Also, as a transposing instrument, clarinets are closer to trumpets (B flat is common) than flutes (C, G). So, clarinet.


1

It is common for saxophones to go sharp in the higher register because of the conical shape of the instrument. Saxophonists do learn to adjust their embouchure to up for this. (Changing the airflow IS changing the embouchure. You must change the position of your soft palate and tongue in order to change air direction.) However, it is important to make sure ...


1

Are you able to play the entire range of the saxophone without the use of the octave key, including the highest notes using the LH palm keys? And can you jump from every note to any other note instantly on the saxophone without the use of the octave key and perfectly in tune? If so, go ahead and keep on doing what you are doing. But if you cannot do all of ...


1

I think you've just run into a "Cranky old Lady" model. Just as beginners have difficulty producing the lowest notes until they learn breath control, some saxes are less forgiving than others. It is possible that the C-pad is too close to its hole, thus partially blocking airflow for notes above C. If so, then closing the C-pad to produce C would be fine. ...


1

You beat me to it! In a nutshell Adolphe Sax had a battle in Paris between his invention, the saxophone, and French instrument makers who wanted to protect their market for other comparable instruments. That and his brusque personlaity saw the saxophone sidelined for policial reasons rather thna its virtues.


1

I know this question already has an accepted answer, but it's actually lacking in substance, in my opinion. Also, your reference manual is a good one but it's incomplete as well. I only use it for multiphonics personally. In my opinion, this is a much better resource of alternate fingerings. My teacher recommended playing C + palm D for quick switches ...


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