43

This question has been asked many times and various reason have been proposed: The saxophone is too loud or doesn't blend There are numerous recordings proving that the saxophone in the hands of a good player can play extremely quietly and blend anywhere. There was a cartel of French instrument makers who wanted to protect their market and hindered ...


12

The all-open C# is a tricky note on all saxophones. It tends to be very flat compared to the other notes, but it is also very sensitive to changes in embouchure. Personally, I don't think it is a great note to tune to on saxophone. When possible, I produce this note by use the low-C# fingering with the octave key pressed down. The tone of this fingering can ...


8

C4 as 440Hz (1) seems highly unlikely. Tuning standards have changed a lot over the years but it is fairly fixed today (outside period ensembles). The saxophone is a relatively new instrument and won't appear in these period ensembles (unless it is imitating an unavailable obsolete instrument). There is a complication with the saxophone which is that it ...


7

I think the reasons are economic rather than musical. I don't really buy the argument that it was "invented too late", because it's just 11 years younger than the tuba (1846 vs 1835). And composers did start using it pretty early on - there are pieces by Bizet, Delibes, and others who included the sax. But composers didn't really start considering the sax ...


6

If it works for you, keep on doing it. The only issue you might run into is if you get a new horn or mouthpiece that requires more consistent use of the octave key, you'll need to develop the habit of pressing it. How easy is it to play low notes on your sax? It's possible that you're easily getting the higher octave out due to a small leak in the upper ...


6

∧ (Italian "martellato") is a symbol used to denote a strong accent, usually a rhythmic thrust followed by a decay of the sound. > (Italian "marcato") is a "lighter" version of the same accent. In jazz scores, like the one in the question, it usually also means that the note is supposed to be played for approximately ​2⁄3 of its normal duration. With the ...


4

What instrument do you play? What is the reed strength? If you are a beginner, you should stick to 1-1.5 reed strength (2 on the alto would be fine too). Is the instrument new or used? If used, when was it checked/repaired last? Saxophones are notorious for having a poor low end and a big difference between middle C and middle D. I have a professional-level ...


4

First of all, I strongly disagree with your teacher about using the key. The key is there for a reason: to make it much easier to produce the desired pitches. Now, it is certainly true on most if not all wind instruments that you can "overblow" to produce the upper register sans octave key. I had a couple teachers (clarinet) who recommended this as an ...


3

I think it is good for practice to not use the octave key for certain passages, you learn how to voice the notes better and makes some transitions smoother in my opinion, this works for me on clarinet and saxophone as well. Properly using he register key will deliver the best sound and pitch without any doubt, that is how the instrument is designed, there ...


2

I'll focus on the end, which is where the tune deviates from a normal blues. Harmonically, the bass is ascending chromatically from B, while the chords descend chromatically from E♭Maj. (You can most clearly hear these chords in the saxophone, which outlines those triads in the melody.) The combination of ascending and descending creates an interesting ...


2

My Take the Sax is would be easier choice you can work around the embouchure. I play both the clarinet and saxophone (Alto and Tenor) I struggled on the tenor for a few months due to the less firm embouchure needed on the Tenor Sax. but today the tenor is my first choice instrument... Fingering is also much easier on the sax compared to the clarinet


2

Written C is Concert pitch A - 440Hz - for a transposing instrument 'in A'. There's a 'Clarinet in A'. Can't think of anything else in general use that uses that transposition. Certainly not a sax. So either you or your teacher has got muddled.


2

Claiming C4 to be 440Hz is wrong. The international pitch standard is A4 440Hz. Some orchestras, particularly in Europe, tune higher (up to 445Hz). Note: Baroque music is often performed at 415Hz (which is very close to a semitone below standard), but that's not going to be at all relevant for a saxophone player


2

"Finger a C, hear the key." This is the phrase I learned to help keep the transposition straight, and it works for all transposing instruments, not just saxophones. This phrase will help keep you from transposing the wrong direct, but as badjohn pointed out, the octave transposition is something you will just have to learn. A variation that I have heard ...


2

I don't think that there is any very easy short cut. First you need to remember that saying an instrument is in Eb means that when it plays a written C, you get an Eb. It could have been done the other way: name the written note played to get C but it wasn't. Remember that bigger generally means lower, particularly for related instruments. Order the ...


2

With no keys pressed you should be producing a C#2. A C#3 should only come out if you are pressing the octave key. If the note is jumping between C#2 and C#3 you are you are biting too hard or doing something else wrong, or your instrument is leaking. It's impossible to tell without seeing you play. Here's a link to a good introduction to the saxophone ...


2

Honestly, the one you like most. They all have up and down sides. Play what you like the sound and personality of the most.


2

If you mean that your written sax music will be in A, then you are not changing the key, as it would still sound in C. If you mean you want the song to sound in A, then that would put your sax part into 6 sharps!


2

Basic transpositions for sax,l trumpet etc Bb instruments (Bb clarinet, tenor/soprano sax, trumpet ...) Up one tone. C => D, F => G etc Eb instruments (alto/baritone sax) Down 3 semitones. C => A, F => D etc Players of transposing instruments need to know these by heart (and being able to do simple transposition more or less by sight is also ...


1

I would say Saxophone is the easiest instrument I have learned but the hardest to get a good sound on. The fingerings are easier than clarinet and the embouchure is easier than flute. The fingerings on saxophone are very similar to recorder (and flute) so they are very easy. Just try to get lessons if you can to avoid any mistakes while learning. Also alto ...


1

Among woodwinds, clarinet and flute have the most varied repertoire. Much more than oboe, subcontrabassoon, ocarina, etc. Flute embouchure may be more foreign to you than the clarinet's. Also, as a transposing instrument, clarinets are closer to trumpets (B flat is common) than flutes (C, G). So, clarinet.


1

It is common for saxophones to go sharp in the higher register because of the conical shape of the instrument. Saxophonists do learn to adjust their embouchure to up for this. (Changing the airflow IS changing the embouchure. You must change the position of your soft palate and tongue in order to change air direction.) However, it is important to make sure ...


1

Are you able to play the entire range of the saxophone without the use of the octave key, including the highest notes using the LH palm keys? And can you jump from every note to any other note instantly on the saxophone without the use of the octave key and perfectly in tune? If so, go ahead and keep on doing what you are doing. But if you cannot do all of ...


1

I think you've just run into a "Cranky old Lady" model. Just as beginners have difficulty producing the lowest notes until they learn breath control, some saxes are less forgiving than others. It is possible that the C-pad is too close to its hole, thus partially blocking airflow for notes above C. If so, then closing the C-pad to produce C would be fine. ...


1

You beat me to it! In a nutshell Adolphe Sax had a battle in Paris between his invention, the saxophone, and French instrument makers who wanted to protect their market for other comparable instruments. That and his brusque personlaity saw the saxophone sidelined for policial reasons rather thna its virtues.


1

Just one line beneath the stave I think. Saxophones go down to a written Bb. For which the fingering, logically enough, is 'everything closed'. (Yes, it could be written as A#, which would be two lines below. Not sure why the chart includes lots of enharmonics but not that one.) Chart from https://www.reedmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/Alto-Tenor-...


1

As a clarinet and saxophone player, I learned to transpose on sight as I would sometimes play music written at concert pitch e.g. the vocal line above a piano score. If playing alone, I could just play the written notes but if the piano was also playing then I would have to transpose. In the early days, I would envy players whose instruments played at ...


1

It's not a dealbreaker for a high school audition. Transpose it so it comes out 'right' or play it as written. Maybe state which you're doing. But they want to hear you PLAY, they aren't fussed what key you do it in. But there's another issue. Yes, flute is used in jazz bands. But almost always as a double with sax and clarinet. If you can ONLY supply ...


1

I think what may have happened is that your teacher got it backwards: A (which has one octave at 440 Hz, as already established) on the alto and baritone saxophones sounds like concert pitch C. So they may have been thinking that C on these saxophones is A in concert pitch. You could say your teacher...transposed the notes.


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