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If you are going to do this a lot, I strongly suggest you shell out the cash for a music writing software. I won't recommend one, I haven't done this for years. A good one can scan your sheet music, then you can grab the notes with the mouse and transpose them by just pushing, or use the built in functions. You still have to adjust it by hand, but it will ...


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The alto sax part needs to be written in the key of D Major (2 sharps). The alto transposes, and It's sounding pitch is a major sixth below its written pitch. When the vocals sing do-re-mi in F (notes F-G-A), the alto player must see this in D. He/she will read D-E-F# and they will sound in F major. To verify this, look at any concert band score. The ...


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Aaron's answer is correct. To simplify any future writing, the simple formula for E♭ alto is to add 3 sharps to the existing key signature. That's what happens writing for concert F major - add 3 sharps to become D major. So, if the original concert key is 1 sharp, adding 3 sharps will take the key to that of 4 sharps. Original key 4 flats becomes 1 flat (...


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TL;DR (the specific answer) Your voice part's key signature has one flat. The corresponding alto saxophone key signature will have two sharps. The general answer Voice is written in what is called "concert pitch". Concert pitch means that when you write an "A" (specifically, the "A" above "middle C") it is tuned to ...


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You can certainly teach one sax, even if you play a different one. In fact, an awful lot of sax players will possess and play at least a couple in the same band. Alto and Tenor are the most common. The main problem is that Alto and Baritone are both E♭ instruments, while Soprano and Tenor are B♭. This is compensated for by use of transposed keys in the ...


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