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18

T T S T T T S is the pattern for major scale notes. So W W H W W W H, as you state, is another way to describe it. Look at the last part - it's a semitone, or a half step, isn't it? That then is the space between the penultimate note and the root note again. A half step below D has to be C♯. Maybe the confusion is that TTS etc is the 7 intervals ...


7

"Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half " takes you from D to the D an octave higher. The last half is the gap between C# and D.


6

A simple answer! Pentatonic uses 5 notes - let's for now address the pent. major. Notes 1,2,3 5 6. In key C, C D E G A. Leaving out two other diatonic notes - F and B. Together, those produce a tritone, which is considered dissonant. All the other notes will not clash with each other, in any order - thus are consonant. Adding the B and F into the mix means ...


5

I've been quite happy with the Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half tone construction of major scale ... How was this with understanding the major scale of G? C major scale = C - D - EF - G - A - BC = G major scale = G - A - BC - D - EF - G??? -> EF is a halfstep between the 6th and 7th degree! What we need is a whole step from 6 to 7 and a half ...


5

Edit: my answer was based on the assumption that the OP was playing on a major/minor tonal pop song (whatever the correct classification might be), and soloing felt OK as long as he kept using a pentatonic scale, and introducing the two additional notes IV and VII created clashes with the backing track's harmony. But after a few rounds of comments it turns ...


5

Try to think of this piece less in terms of harmony and more in terms of counterpoint. In other words, try to think of this piece more in terms of the horizontal musical lines that are written instead of the vertical harmonies that are the byproducts. You'll notice that the "keys" of each hand are related by fifth. The right hand at the start is "in C," but ...


3

Let's pretend we are in key D. The V chord will be A, and to make it more dominant, we include the G - which is in key D. That would usually resolve to something as close to itself as possible - hence your F# - M3 of D. So, it almost sounds like, after 4 bars (often) in A, there's a modulation into D. It's only temporary, but at the time, who knows? That, ...


3

That is called "woman tone", really famous Les Paul tone.. You absolutly need the humbucker pickup on neck position (you can clearly see it in the video too), turn your tone knob down to somewhere between 0 and 2, volume knob at 10 and you are halfway there. Slash usually used high volume and a lot of gain on his amplifiers to make the tubes scream. You ...


3

It's in Eb (D# will do, but Eb is easier to work in!), probably due to down-tuning to Eb. The 'odd' note is b5, as used in Blues. So, rather than being modal, it just incorporates a blue note - that note in question being Bbb or A natural. I'd put it in Eb blues.


3

C# is in the D major scale, because the ^7 scale degree is a half step below the tonic - the ^1 degree D. ...C#, surely that is a whole tone up from B not a half Yes, but that is the position of the half step. The half step is between C# and D, between the ^7 and ^1 scale degrees. ...why is the last note not C? The last note of the D major scale won'...


3

There is a perfect fit for this chord: CM7b9 with interval set 0,1,4,7,11 Double Harmonic: C Db E F G Ab B chord: C Db E G B There is one inversion without clashing note functions GM6b5add11 with interval set 0,4,5,6,9 Asian (5th mode of Double Harmonic): G Ab B C Db E F chord: G B C Db E


3

Dodecatonic would seem to fit, but since we can already refer to it as the chromatic scale, there seems little point.


2

I've seen some say the altered scale can be used whenever the 5th of the dominant chord is altered. Just wanted to point out it can be used for a #5 or a b5 too. The altered scale is just the seventh mode of the melodic minor scale. That may help you with learning the scale which upon first sight seems like a very strange scale. FWIW, several other modes ...


2

There are many ways to play the B♭ minor scale on the guitar. Assuming you want the natural minor scale, this is one example of how to play it, shown in standard tablature: ——————————————————————————————-6-8-9- ————————————————————————-6-7-9——————- ————————————————————-6-8————————————- —————————————-6-8-10————————————————— ———————-6-8-9——————————————————————...


2

Bbm chord x13321 Bb minor pentatonic scale You mention playing "lead". The most common "lead" scale in rock and blues is the minor pentatonic scale. A pentatonic scale is a scale with 5 tones. You can play other scales over a minor chord, but minor pentatonic is probably the place moost rock/blues players will start. This one chord form and one scale isn'...


2

The term "Dodecatonic" is most commonly used to describe a 12-tone scale. This naming is consistent with "dodecagon" (a 12-sided figure) as well as a "dodecahedron" (a 12-faced three dimensional shape).


2

There are various types of cadences that sound resolved. Classical music tends to focus on perfect cadences (V>I) and, to a lesser extent, plagal cadences (IV>I) in terms of resolved cadences. But there are other cadences that sound resolved too, and bVII can have a relatively strong "pull" to the I. Not as much as a V7 does, but it's still very much ...


2

A 7th chord tends to pull down fifthwise (or up fourthwise), so changing the I to a I7 is a way to pull to the IV. It's just like in a perfect cadence, where you have V7 > I, but in a smaller way. You also see the same thing in Latin music in a minor key, they'll swap the i (minor) for I7 (dom7) to lead into the 4 chord. Example of the minor variety (...


2

Maybe 'sound consonant' is the wrong description. If you linger on many of the intervals in this piece - the 4th, 5th and 6th notes, and their equivalents in the next phrase for instance, they are demonstrably dissonant. But Bartok is demonstrating that strong melodic lines can make dissonances acceptable - or, rather, irrelevant. He's not abandoned ...


2

Can somebody explain how the harmony works in this piece? There's is nothing to explain. The harmony is the result of the counterpoint of 2 contrary parts. This is a teaching example: The goal of this interval study is to demonstrate - or to find out by the pupils themselves - which intervals we will become by starting of a certain pitch and two parts are ...


1

you even find mp3 of scales in wikipedia. But why learn them by listening? As you have a guitar you could learn the intervals of the scales (writing a schema) play them on your guitar try to sing them and controle it with the guitar you can also record your singing with the syllabls of do re mi that will help you a lot and also sing all intervals starting ...


1

I think you are saying that bVII sounds like a dominant because bVII I feels like conclusion, even though you know that the dominant is V (or v). I think the concept you are referring to is a cadence, which is exactly that: a chord progression that feels like conclusion. Turns out the (maybe) most common cadence is the Perfect Cadence (V I), which involves ...


1

You seem a bit confused with your scales. In the C natural minor scale the Bb would work as the dominant, but to Eb, if it was followed by Eb, but not to Cm. Your progression is Cm > Ab > Bb > Cm. In the Eb major scale that would be vi IV V vi, whereas in the C natural minor scale this would be i bVI bVII i. If you want the dominant for the C ...


1

I guess: Regarding the piano scale-in-thirds will mean thirds played with one hand scales-a-third-apart played with both hands.


1

If you play the 12 bar blues so that the tonic is just a plain triad until adding the minor 7th in bar 4 (which is actually how a lot of blues work) it is easier to see what happens. With Roman numeral analysis under the chord letters: A A A A7 I V7/IV D D A A IV I G7 D A G7 V7 IV I V7 I left the seventh off of the IV chord to keep ...


1

The basic Blues progression - A7,D7,A7,E7,D7,A7 - is all dominant 7th shape chords. A7 is the dominant 7th chord of D. That's why. It's a little harder to explain (in a 'circle of 5ths' way, at least) why the last part of the progression - E7, D7, A7 - is so satisfactory.


1

You seem a bit unclear with the Greek language. Dodecaphonic comes from the Greek words Δώδεκα (dodeca = twelve) and φώνος (phonos = phone* as in phonetics, not as in telephone) Dodecatonic comes from the Greek words Δώδεκα (as above) and τόνος (tonos = tone) Dodecaphonic means something else, 12-tone composition. Yes, but not necessarily. As you see ...


1

Shifting the scale like this won't really work on a Bansuri, and even more generally for a composition that is raga based. This is because the relative pitches of successive notes are not the same, or in other words Indian classical music does not use an equal tempered scale. You could try shifting the notes and playing the song, but it will sound slightly ...


1

Each of the allowed chords for any mode of a scale is allowed in all of the modes. Only its function would differ. Here is a list of allowed chords for the 'Double Harmonic' scale and its modes. Note that each chord in the list is transposed to the key of C, while these should be mapped correctly to different keys depending on your mode and the function of ...


1

So my question is:if there exists a named scale that contain these six notes, what is it? Here are the common scales that fit your notes. As you can see, both the Harmonic Minor and Double Harmonic fit. Harmonic Minor Phrygian Dominant: A Bb C# D E F G Aeolian Harmonic/Lydian sharp 2: Bb C# D E F G A Ultralocrian: C# D E F G A Bb Harmonic Minor: D E F G ...


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