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15

You seem to have confused the concepts of (1) chord, (2) scale, and (3) key. Your teacher gave you the E minor scale because of the E minor key, not because of the E minor chord. :) Confusing? Let's see: The E minor chord, abbreviated as Em, has three notes: E, G and B. The "E minor scale"... you probably mean the E natural minor scale. It has the ...


14

The problem is that intervals are ratios, so using subtraction to calculate the "extra" interval (frequency) is the wrong operation. The "extra" interval is ~ 1.014. (3/2)12 / 27 = 129.746337890625 / 128 = 1.0136432647705078125 One quarter of a semitone is In equal temperament ~ 1.015 (21/12)1/4 = 21/48 = 1.0145453349 In Pythagorean ...


11

Chord tones and not chord tones When improvising against any chord, the "primary" notes are those in the chord itself. Other notes are more or less decorative: adding color, passing from one chord note to another, or serving as embellishments to a particular note. An example of chord tones and not chord notes and how to use them Take an A minor ...


7

Sound pitch increases with logarithm of frequency, which makes calculations somewhat non-intuitive. For this reason pitch is often given in the units of cents, which are additive. Number of cents of interval between frequencies f and f₀ is calculated as x = 1200 · log₂(f/f₀). For example, an octave, or f/f₀ = 2 has 1200·log₂(2) = 1200·1 = 1200 cents. An ...


4

Yes, chords in the verse are G and F, with G being the tonic. So it's a major key, and F is indeed out of key. In this case it could be considered a modal interchange from the key of G minor. You could notate the chord progression as I bVII. Interestingly, while in the intro G and F are clearly outlined by the melody, in the verses the melody sticks to G ...


4

Let's look at this a different way. You are thinking that the notes from one scale maybe won't fit four different chords. How about if notes from that same scale won't even fit the root chord in question? Key is Em. Play the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th, or 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th - all in simple order, on the 4 beats, over the chord of Em. You may agree that they ...


4

Is there another name for the scale defined by the interval pattern 1,3,1,3,1,3? This resource provides the following names: Messiaen truncated mode 3, Hexatonic Set, Prometheus (Liszt), Genus tertium inverse This page gives the following "common names" for the scale: Western Modern Augmented Inverse Six Tone Symmetrical Named After ...


4

There is. In fact, there are two! Due to the pattern, there are two modes of this set of notes. One is more simply named: Symmetrical Augmented. m3 - s - m3 - s, etc. The other - s - m3 - s - m3, etc has been given the catchy name Messiaen Inv. III Truncated n2, not really tripping off even a jazzer's tongue, not even a triple tonguing trumpeter's... Used ...


3

I think there is, but the augmented scale as three semitones/one semitone is maybe the common way it's described. I know some articles that define a hexatonic scale as a semitone/3 semitones: Tymoczko - The semitone constraint in scalar structure Tymoczko - Scale networks and Debussy https://www.michaelnorris.info/theory/pressingscales a nice summary of ...


2

The B major scale contains B, C#, E, F#, which happen to be all the notes of A major pentatonic, minus the root. The G# is the 7th of A, playing might give the chord an Amaj7 feel. The D# (#11) and the A# (b9) definitely provide some tension, with the former providing a lydian feel, which is common enough in some genres. My guess is it sounds good because it ...


2

This video: refers to the regular augmented scale as a “minor third/half step scale” at around one minute in. Following that logic there’s no reason not to call your 1-3-1-3-1-3 scale a half (or half step)/minor third scale. In the video it is mentioned at around the 1:48 mark.


1

The tonal centre is, indeed G, and the chords are indeed Fmaj7/G and E♭maj7/F. Fmaj7/G is a specific voicing. It's rooted on G, but it isn't based on a G triad. There's no B, there's no D. We'd have to call it G13(sus4)(omit5) or something just as ugly. No, Fmaj7/G is fine! There's no functional 'cycle of 5ths' stuff going on here (I seem to be writing ...


1

I was listening to a musical cadence of A maj to F# maj. The melody run in the A measures sounded intriguing to me and I knew there was something "different" about it so I transcribed it. (Wanted to include the transcription in this comment but doesn't seem as though attachments are allowed.) Basically it started on low C#, went all the way up to a ...


1

...soloing over an A major chord using a B major scale "works"... Define "works." Anything can "work." A major and B major scale only differ by two sharps, D and A sharp. Common tones are B C# E F# G# - which superficially looks like an E major pentatonic scale. That set of tones over both an A major or B major chord give ...


1

Super Ultra Hyper Mega Meta Lydian (or just Metalydian for short), is simply a repeating pentachord consisting of four repeating intervals: WWWH-WWWH-WWWH etc. The first two iterations happen to reproduce the seven degrees of the Lydian scale before diverging on the #8. When the diatonic scales first were introduced as "church modes," they were ...


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