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10

It's 'allowed', normal and commonplace to use notes that aren't in the prevailing scale or chord. But this F is really an E♯, which IS in the scale of F♯ minor, in two out of three of its common forms, melodic, harmonic and natural. The book dumbs down E♯ to F.


8

You can play pretty much anything, depending on context and what has been established both melodically and harmonically. All modes derived from the mayor scale are commonly used: Lydian easily fits any mayor chord Locrian can be played over V (VII m7b5 as diatonic substitution of V7) Phrygian can easily fit any minor chord (using that b2 as leading tone ...


6

I would not use the G whole-half diminished scale to create a line on the V7 chord of a ii-V7-I chord progression in C Major. I would use the G half-whole diminished scale instead. The G whole-half diminished scale is G-A-B♭-C-D♭-E♭-E-F♯ and sadly does not contain a B♮, unlike the V7 chord of C Major (which is a G7 chord). The ...


5

If you are following the standard mode-chord mapping you should use Dorian over the ii Mixolydian over the V7 Ionian over I as your question alludes to. However this is not a useful approach to true improve. If you want to play "out" I find the blues (more specifically the minor blues) can be forced onto almost anything. You have the b5, b3, and b7. ...


5

There are different ways to see it. Your E minor pentatonic fits there, because the notes of the E minor pentatonic added to an A major chord either support the A major, or add to it creating more complex chords. Additionally the G note does something that's not found in plain A major scale, making it a dominant chord (A7). When vamped over instead of ...


4

In major keys, classical composers most frequently would modulate up by fifth to the key of the dominant (V), even in a short piece. While part of the rationale for choosing the dominant was probably the closeness in scale, it was also because dominant chords became associated with "tension" that needed to resolve at cadences in classical style. Moving to ...


3

Dorian-Myxolydian-Ionian If I understood correctly, you'd play dorian on the ii, mixolydian on the V and ionian on the I? No wonder you want variety, because that's practically like playing the same scale all the time, because you don't have even a single out-of-scale note anywhere. :) In modal playing, things stay in the same harmonic posture for a long ...


3

Go in the other direction, descending fifths: C, F, Bb ...Cb, Fb, Bbb, Ebb, Abb. You should end up see a similar number of double flats appearing. Also, you might look into the harmonic uses of double sharps and flats. Like using Fx in G# minor to spell a V chord D# Fx A#. Or, Bbb to spell a minor iv chord in Db major Gb Bbb Db. That takes things out of ...


3

The reason you didn't get more double accidentals is because you didn't complete the exercise. You made the arbitrary assumption that a the keynote of the scale can't be a double sharp or flat. For example B double flat major has two double flats. If you write all the scales in the cycle of 5ths from C double flat through to C double sharp, you will get ...


3

This task wouldn't make sense if we don't consider the in melodic minor scales the upper tetrachord is borrowed from the parallel major key, as in normal major keys there are normally (in the root scale) no double sharps. But if you have secondary dominants or secondary viidim7 chords the double sharps will be used. I don't think that Ockeghem was occupied ...


2

The proper scale for minor keys is not natural minor but harmonic or melodic minor. Harmonic minor has a raised 7th to create a leading tone. This is crucial to create a proper resolution or cadence to the minor chord. The melodic minor also has a raised 6th to get rid of the minor third created in the harmonic minor scale and create a scale with proper "...


2

Perhaps you like the sound of the 9th. Why wouldn't you? The scale has the root, the fifth and the seventh, and then you add the ninth. Leaving out the third probably has a big effect---it doesn't tie you down to a particular sound (major or minor). It's more rock than blues.


2

The answers so far provide a lot of good info. Have you tried any other mixtures of modes or degrees? Like D min penta on A, or E Phrygian, E Major? The reason I ask is that there are "compatible keys" in western music theory and no surprise they fall on the circle of 5ths (or 4ths depending on which direction you go). You can see this from the ...


2

Modulation would also be accomplished by going to the relative key, root going up or down a minor third : down if the original tonality is Major, up if minor (i.e. CM <-> Am ; Dm <-> FM ; etc ). Another common way is to modulate to any other tonality only sharing a common chord, asserting the new tonality using a cadential harmonic movement (i.e. V-I,...


1

One way to see and use a diminished scale is as a combination of two dim7 chords. As a starting point, one way to see and use one dim7 chord is as a dominant chord, and its "mount points" are on the third and seventh of the dominant seventh. For example if you have a G7, you take its third, B, and put a dim7 there. Or you could take the G# - a semitone ...


1

In a strict sense, the diminished scale is the whole-half scale, because that's the scale you want to use over a diminished chord. It has all the notes of the diminished chord and all notes a whole step above those chord tones. Since these extra notes are a whole step above the chord tones they are no avoid notes. If you used the half-whole scale over a ...


1

Dm6, as you have written, comprises D F A B. The fact that there's a B♮ in there isn't that important. That note features in the scale of D melodic minor (D E F G A B C♯), so it could be expected in Dm - or the relative F major too. As far as its function is concerned, it gets used as V/V, containing notes similar to G9(no root). It's also ...


1

Most frequent are probably modulation to the subdominant or dominant. Relative key and parallel key Modulation to the mediant key https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediant


1

it is hard to know for sure exactly what was in the minds of the classical composers. Remember that the circle of 5ths is just one representation of the commonality between the keys of the 12 tone system. Considering the thought that music might be the space between the keys, rather than the keys them selves; It might have been that the composers were ...


1

The picture shows the MM indication several times, first time MM=52 then a series of MM= without a number later on MM=40 and finalley MM= without a number MM indicates the metronome speed. So for the options without a number you probably decide the speed yourself. I can't think of any other meaning of MM in this context. As far as I know MM is an ...


1

It's the same idea as a lot of beginner players use for a 12 bar 'blues'. If they know the pentatonic minor scale notes in, say, A, then they'll play those over all three chords in a 12 bar in A. That includes over the other two chords - D and E. So particularly over the D chord, it's exactly what you do. But it works (by and large) over all three. There ...


1

or if there is in fact a name for techniques like this Oh yes, there is. Enharmonic equivalents.


1

1st Q: What common characteristics can you find in the works of composers like Holst, Vaughan Williams, or Grainger? I list these three in particular because of their propensity to build on existing folk songs A: Well, the early 20th century was a period of English folk song revival. Many composers wrote in the genre of the time. It's more accurate to say ...


1

Different modes of the pentatonic scale A Minor Pentatonic (aeolian) C Major Pentatonic (ionian) D Sus2 Pentatonic (dorian) E Minor Pentatonic (phrygian) G Sus2 Pentatonic (mixolydian) In relation to the diatonic scale, the modes of the minor pentatonic scale in order would be - Aeolian Pentatonic (missing 2 and 6) Ionian Pentatonic (missing 4 and ...


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