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9

They're kind of the same thing. (But only kind of...) The Wikipedia entry for Extended chord includes an example of exactly what you're asking: a 13-chord "collapsed" into a tone cluster (though by convention, the chordal 4th/11th is omitted). Interpretation of 2-9 / 4-11 / 6-13 is open to debate There have been a variety of interpretations over ...


7

Modes are defined by two things: (1) the home note, i.e. the tonic, and (2) the relative harmony around the tonic. A backing track has much more power in setting the home note than any guitar solo. You can play the D Dorian scale all you like, but if the bass player keeps playing the C note, you lose the battle, the total mode (which is a feeling really) ...


5

Scale is a bit abstract concept. You can play a melody based on a scale, or you can build a chord from the scale steps. But if we say "play a scale" we really mean to "play a melody consisting of consecutive notes of a scale". If you play several notes together it's a chord. What's the difference between C-D-E-F-G-A-B and C-E-G-B-D-F-A (...


5

One thing is to take a simple tune in a major key, and sticking initially to one key, try to play it all over the neck, using the shapes and positions you say you've learned. Then play it in different keys, all over the neck again. Not from the dots - which will only be in one key, but using your fretboard knowledge. Another is to use 1,3,5 (and maybe 7), to ...


5

The starting note has to be accurate for me to find the rest of the melody accurately. This makes me suspect you are working from your memory of a recording or of a particular edition of notated score. Normally I would expect this to be the case with a pop song, not a nursery or folk tune like Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, because pop songs are usually ...


4

Any backing track will basically use chords/harmonies from a particuar key/mode In that track, one chord in particular will feel like 'home'. That will be the key chord - literally. Let's take C major as the Ionian - parent - key. A backing track that uses chords from that key will home in on C major. There will be no confusion as to where it belongs. You ...


4

Tonal center is a name of the note that "feels like home". If you can name such note, then it is the tonal center. But you can use many different chords and scales in a single piece, while still maintaining the same tonal center. A very simple example: you have a progression in C major, you use C ionian scale, but when the dominant G chord comes, ...


4

One possible approach to this is exactly what you mentioned in your post: to recognize the inherent asymmetry in tonal music. The perfect fifth, for instance, does not split the octave in two, but rather just barely misses it. Same with the major triad: the third doesn't split the perfect fifth in two, but it just barely misses. So one of the ways in which a ...


3

These chord-names evolved to describe what musicians were actually playing. Your major 11th and major 13th chords would rarely if ever have been played: they don't sound good. Gm7 over C is common and it was named G11 as a kind of shorthand description. But the third (E) is left out. It does of course contain the 11th (F). You said, From my understanding, ...


3

Your problem, if I understand the question, is that many songs do not start on the tonic. Those that do are far easier to play from that note, but if you try something like Fur Elise, which starts on 5, or With a Little help from my Friends, which starts on 3, and assume that's actually the root or tonic, you come unstuck. So, you need to establish what any ...


3

Several answers already point out the importance of voicing and common omissions with 13th chords so I won't repeat those points. ...From my understanding, the notion of calling them 9, 11, 13, instead of 1, 3, 5, 7, 2, 4, 6, is telling users that those notes should be higher in pitch than the 7th note. A few additional things you might want to know about, ...


2

Simply expained: the scale is an ascending and descending set of notes - the diatonic scale meaning each neighbouring note is either one semitone of one tone away from each other. And - eacch played as a separate sound. Chords are played with all the notes sounding simultaneously. So even that negates the two being the same. A 13th chord - which actually ...


2

What's the difference between a 13th chord and a full heptatonic scale? You mean "a theoretical 13th chord". In practice, when someone writes a chord symbol like G13, they don't mean a full theoretical 13th chord, they mean "9 add13". A commonly used guitar chord fingering for G13 is 3x3455, which doesn't have an 11th anywhere. Or even ...


2

Following the theory by Schenker a “train” of a 5th 54321 or octave 87654321 or a triad 531 defines the tonal center, no matter if minor or major or any other mode. Urlinie in relation to the tonic triad. The fundamental line (German: Urlinie) is the melodic aspect of the Fundamental structure (Ursatz), "a stepwise descent from one of the triad notes to ...


2

I think you've already pointed in your question to one reason that a scale can have a tonal centre: because we're free to simply define it as having one. People are free to talk about the D chromatic scale, for example - and it might be entirely sane to describe the tonality of a piece as 'D chromatic', in some cases. The reason why a particular scale might ...


1

Try first to play the scale do-re-mi-fa-so-la-ti-do (with the halftone steps mi-fa and ti-do). You have to know the whole and semitones of the major scale! If you find the melody is fitting to this scale, you will also be able to identify the starting note of the melody, this may be the 1st, 3rd, 5th (very seldom another, or even chromatic approach to one ...


1

A simple picture is sometimes better than a huge explanation, so i'd also encourage to check the graphs in this link, you can mouseover the 10edo to the 19edo for example to see the differences between various divisions: http://www.tonalsoft.com/enc/e/edo-11-odd-limit-error.aspx ( just look at strongest consonances : 3 - 1/3** , 5 - 1/5 and 3/5 - 5/3 , the ...


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