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8

If you are basing your harmony off of F minor, this chord progression makes a lot of sense especially wanting to use C major instead of C minor. This is very rooted in the traditional study of harmony by weaving though the 3 minor scales which are F natural minor, F harmonic minor, and F melodic minor which gives the following sets of notes: F natrual minor ...


7

Let me take a controversial stance: the tonic is always subjective. There is no such thing as one objective tonic at any particular point in a compostition. I'm not arguing that the idea of a tonic is useless, though, I'm just saying that the best conceptual understanding of a tonic (or tonal center, or key center, or a bunch of other phrases that refer to ...


5

There are some rare tunes that are only built on notes of the triad of the tonic like a canon: 1111 333- 5555 888- 5588 558- 5533 551- Here we have an absolut clear situation: No cadence but only tonic ... or this fantastic march of the Swiss Army ;) There are many songs just commuting between tonic and dominant: "Hey ho, ...


5

This piece is in F Lydian. The Lydian is the fourth mode of the Major Scale: you can think of this as being the notes of any particular Major Scale but using the 4th degree as the tonic (root note). A simple example of a Lydian Mode would be the notes of C Major, but using the 4th degree (F) as the tonic. Coincidentally, this is exactly the mode used here. (...


5

Interesting chart! Let's see what it shows and what it doesn't. It shows a few characterstics of each mode: The 1st column summarizes specific intervals to each mode (ie: augmented 4th for Lydian, major 6th for Dorian). Each "cell" shows 2 chords/mode (generally the I and IV chord, but it varies according to the mode, showing the most identifying ones) ...


4

The best way to tell if the tonic has changed is to see if what Schoenberg calls "neutralization" over an extended period of time. Neutralization occurs when a chromatic form of a note is used instead of the original version. For example, in effecting a move from C major to G major, the F# should emphasized to show that we're no longer in C. One method is to ...


4

The way to figure out what the tonic is, is to see around which note the melody revolves and resolves. If you have a song that is in C major, the melody will most likely be based around the note C. Take note though, that the melody will emphasize the note C. That means it will be played in cadences, in strong beats etc, if the composer wants to give you the ...


4

No scale (I could find) contains those chords. Well, one scale that definitely contains those chords is the chromatic (12-tone) scale. You're free to use all those notes in whatever way you want! It's also likely that there's a way to see your progression in terms of diatonic scales too, if that's important to you. But to answer your question directly, If ...


4

I will try my best to answer your questions. 1) So what I understand is , If we are playing in Key of CMajor , we can play only these chords with Whatever Roman Numeral Chord Progression. And if we have to shift the key, we have to go according to circle of Fifth and that will be Gmajor Key next. Is that correct ? A1) To your first question/statement "If ...


3

You may be aware of the interval formula for building the major scale, (w - w - h) - w - (w - w - h) where w = whole step and h = half step. There are 8 notes, one repeated, and 7 intervals or spaces between notes. I put parenthesis around a common, and repeated, pattern called a tetrachord. Dorian is built in the following manner, (w - h - w) - w - (w ...


3

Is A Dorian a G major scale No. Both have the same key signature of one sharp. But they have different tonics. The tonic is the "home" tone of the mode/key. If you just noodle around either of the two, they might seem interchangeable. If you play with some harmonic sensibility, you will hear the seemingly exact same tones between the two scales don't ...


3

The scale of the A Dorian mode contains all the same notes as the G major scale, and the set of notes can be found by starting on the second note of the G major scale. But that fact doesn't tell you anything about what A Dorian sounds like. The A Dorian modal feeling has almost nothing in common with G major. A Dorian is a minor mode, G major is not. A ...


3

There's nothing objective that makes the tonic the tonic. It's a question of judgment and perception, rather than well-defined rules. It's certainly possible to point to conventions within certain styles of music, but nothing definitive. Sometimes, two people will disagree on what the tonic is. Sometimes it might not be clear that there's an established ...


3

Here's what we know about your melodies: uses C Major scale uses D, E, F, G, A starts on D "didn't feel resolved ending on C ... [on] a D it sounded resolved" Your melodies are either in D Dorian or D Aeolian (minor), not C Major. D dorian is the second mode of C Major so it's understandable that you have confused them with one another. Likewise, they ...


3

Aebersold and Berklee have a lot to answer for! They formalised a system of improvisation that was teachable and testable. But they gave a generation of players the idea that this was THE way to approach jazz. It's harder to emulate Armstrong or Beiderbecke 'by numbers' (though their approach CAN be analysed and studied). I recommend you do so, ...


3

First off you came across a standard education method of exposing new students to the connection between modes are chords but that is just one ingredient to understanding music. By the way this connection isn't special to Jazz, it exists in classical music too. Not sure how you derived the statement "...were the ultimate key to jazz improvisation and ...


3

It is not quite clear to me what you are trying to do but I think you are transcribing or changing the progression to a minor key from a major. So, in C major the I and ii chords are C maj and D min. As 7th chords they'd be C Maj7 and D min7. All you need to do to get the correct chords in sequence in a major or minor key is look at the triads created by ...


3

Literal transposition from major to minor doesn't work very well. You have discovered one of the reasons. You seem to think minor' just means 'natural minor'. There's the Harmonic and Melodic minor scales as well. Those non-flattened 6ths and 7ths are very useful options when attempting functional harmony.


3

This is not remotely a complete answer, but just a hint: There are many "flavours" of minor that you can mix and use in various combinations. For example, try this. (And do try it now, if possible, before you read further, so the first impact is not influenced by the theoretical aspect) Take your C minor scale, and see how it sounds over this progression: ...


3

The problem is that you cannot transpose from major to minor. You can observe the analogies and differences between parallel keys, but they are not supposed to work interchangeably. Playing a sequence of chords in a key or mode does not guarantee you a similar effect in any other key or mode, because you are playing completely different notes. Of course ...


3

I would just like to add something to Tim's answer. I do not think it's good to think of natural minor in the way you do ("I'm going to flatten the 3rd, 6th and 7th degree"). I was taught to think of minor keys in terms of their relative majors, not their parallel majors, and I think it's a lot better, especially when you start to get into modes (natural ...


3

Write the enharmonic equivalents of D# and A# (=Eb and Bb). Then you have the progression V-bVII-IV-I. Eb is a borrowed chord of f-minor. (As the other chords are are sus4 we even don’t know whether they’re major or minor. But if you are soloing in f-minor, it will be f- minor - or you have blue notes in mind ...). Is this o.k.? Every pthing is o.k. ...


3

You're approaching music theory from the wrong direction. Take a real piece of music - take LOTS of pieces of music - and see what they actually do. You'll find that some songs do confine themselves to the notes and chords of a single scale, but many don't. C, Am, F, C. The 'four chord trick' behind a lot of simple pop songs of the 50s and 60s. C7, ...


3

You have discovered they way I practice scales. If you are playing C mixolydian after playing C maj you are in the Key of F maj. C Dorian is Bb Maj, etc. You are changing key up a 4th each time you change modes like this, and as you discovered the pattern comes back to Ionian but a half step up from where you started. Keep going until you've covered the ...


3

"Where do these chords come from in "When the Sun Goes Down" by Arctic Monkeys? The chords do not line up with the key of B. I am confused." You are indeed! Confused in your concept that the chords of a song SHOULD all be diatonic - using only the notes of the home scale. Where did that come from? Ditch that concept, then you can ditch a lot more '...


2

It's always going to be a compromise going from major to minor. Mainly beause minor consists of one change in the lower 5 notes of the minor scale - the 3rd, going major to minor. The defining note. Still going up the scale(s) gives lots of options. In fact all the remaining notes chromatically! So you stating flatten the 6th and 7th doesn't have to be the ...


2

I have perhaps a bit of a different take on this. Sort of the same, but maybe a little more practical in use. You ask if it's ok to play a pentatonic scale over the harmonized chords of the scale. Yes...it is. And no, it isn't. You know that a full scale has seven notes. Also, it has seven harmonized chords, based on seven modes, using Ionian (what ...


2

Today's trend in jazz education is to focus a lot on scales, but this seems to be pretty recent. I think it can be linked to the rise of the Jamey Aebersold method. He started producing his play-a-longs in the 1970s, and each one contains a primer on "chord/scales." This series is still being produced and is probably the most popular jazz teaching aid in the ...


2

...other than forcing the listener to come from and go back to the selected note as the center? I take that to mean devices like repeating a certain tone or rhythmic things like putting a tone on a strong beat or ending of phrases. That pretty much leaves harmony as the means of defining the tonic. In the major/minor system cadential harmony defines the ...


2

There are two parts to your question though that may not be obvious. First, "How does one compose in a minor key?" (even if only for a few bars). Second, "How does one re-write a given piece from a major to minor key?" The answer to the second requires answering the first. Melodies are not generally too much a problem. One can often tell by ear whether one ...


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