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13

mode = set of notes + tonic Modes sound different, because each scale degree's distance to the tonic i.e. home note is different. The home note is in a different location relative to the other notes of the scale. The tonic is your zero-point, your viewpoint, where you place your camera: depending on where it is, everything around you is in a relatively ...


10

Stand in your kitchen and look around you. Now stand on your head in your kitchen, so that you are upside down. Do things look the same? (Or if you're not so good at gymnastics, lie on your back and try the same experiment!) The things in the room are all in the same positions relative to each other; nothing has moved. But the world looks very different ...


10

In tonal harmony, all major (Ionian) scales follow the same pattern of whole steps and half steps: W-W-H-W-W-W-H. When you want to play all of the major triads for a particular key, you stack each chord up in thirds and use the notes from that specific scale. For example, if you are playing the D Major scale, the D triad would have the notes D-F#-A; D to F#...


8

Scales! By learning the scales of each key, you'll know the diatonic notes from each key. At the same time, by starting on different notes from each of those scales, the modes will gradually be revealed. Arpeggios! By learning the arpeggios of each key, you'll understand what a m3, M3, P5 etc. is in those keys. Then start transposing one line tunes into ...


7

Unfortunately, notes and chords (triads especially) are often called by the same names. When someone says 'play a D', it could mean play a D note, or play a D major chord.That's confusing, and it's where you came unstuck. You already know the note names for the D major scale, that's fine. The first answer explained the triads. From a major scale there's ...


6

learn the circle of fifths rules and you can work them out in your head. Its then easy to memorise the more you do it. Its even better than counting sheep to get to sleep. So, Start at C (C D E F G A B), move to the fifth G and sharp the fourth giving G A B C D E F# . repeat, taking D and sharping C gives you D major. Repeat ad somnolum.


4

True, the seven modes of one key all contain the same notes as the parent key (Ionian). But it's the key centres that differ. In the Ionian mode (major key)in C, the actual note C is the root, home if you like. When a piece is in that key, the note where everything feels like it's at rest best is that C. All the other notes bear some relationship to that ...


4

II7 could be labelled a 'secondary dominant' - particularly if it DOES progress to V. But we must beware of giving functional names to a chord which DOESN'T have that function. Like calling the second chord of a Blues a 'dominant 7th'. It's that shape, yes, but it isn't being the dominant of anything. The current trend to always call that shape chord a '...


3

In isolation what you have is simply an altered chord but as noted above it can be use functionally as a 'secondary dominant' by (in your specific case) setting up tension which pulls towards the D major. See Secrets Of Song Writing To address the comments below An altered chord is a chord in which one or more notes from the diatonic scale is replaced ...


3

If you are referring to the 5th mode of the harmonic minor scale, that scale is typically referred to as the Phrygian Dominant scale due to it being the Phrygian scale with one alteration that makes the tonic chord a dominant 7th. It does have other names one which is "Spanish Phrygian". Built off of A, it would contain the following notes: A B♭ C&...


3

So you already know how to construct a scale from semitone jumps, and you know that frets are spaced at semitone (i.e. half step) intervals, and so you were able to put these two things together to form major scales on one string. Now you only have to see the string-to-string intervals in terms of semitones, and you'll be able to utilize more than one string....


3

Basically, I want to have all the notes in every usable key memorized so that I can instantly just call them to my memory and play them. To me, recalling 'the notes' - (plural) - sounds slow, because it sounds like you need to remember and think about more than one thing before you've even touched the instrument. Personally, if I want to play in E minor, I ...


2

If you think of what 'CAGED' is, it's learning 5 shapes - C, A, G, E, and D - and then thinking of how those chord (and corresponding scale) shapes fit together them to give you a way of seeing the whole of a given scale pattern (or chord shape pattern) for the whole neck. So to think about chords in terms of CAGED, you do have to learn those basic chord ...


2

I have literature that defines the CAGED system with illustrations and diagrams the are exactly the same fingering patterns as you have in your illustration of scale patterns. One of the things I have noticed is that when players study scale patterns, they often learn one or two and then choose to use them in their playing without going any further in their ...


2

The pentatonic scale(s) leave out two important notes. The major pentatonic uses, in key C, C, D, E, G and A. Missing notes are F and B. They themselves are a tritone apart. The tritone itsellf is deemed to be a dissonant interval. The other 5 blend better with each other - let's face it, 3 of them constitute the major triad in that key! So in any order, ...


1

There are many different patterns for playing a major scale on the guitar. All will use the same formula of TTSTTTS (or WWhWWWh) - gaps between successive notes. The simplest one will start on one string, somewhere, and go progressively up that same string in the increments shown. It works, but is hardly practical. Probably the most common uses all of the ...


1

Also, am I using the term "degrees" correctly? For example, how many degrees in a scale like this: C Db Eb Fb Gb Abb Bbb (h W h W h W mi3rd) Is it 3, since the Fb, Abb, and Bbb are enharmonically natural notes, or is it 6, since all six notes are altered? Enharmonic notes do not imply the number of degrees in a scale. You have used all 7 letters, so ...


1

I don't know what you mean by the primary scale. Do you have a reference which defines that term? Do you intend to find ways to divide the octave up into 7 intervals, and then somehow decide which of the pitches would have to be the tonic in order for the scale to be primary? If so, then I don't know of anyone else who does that, so I don't see the value of ...


1

Secondary Dominants. A bit like an optical illusion, where you realise that what you're looking at isn't what you first thought. When you first hear the C Major and G Major chords you assume that you are in the key of C Major and those two chords are I and V of that key. However - when you hear the D Major chord, you realise you're in G Major not C Major, ...


1

That sound can also be expanded if you make the III major as well. So I, II, III. In your case it'd be G chord, A chord, B chord. I had the same question in the key of C major. I was told it was called "Real Planing". See here: What's the relationship between the chords Cmaj Dmaj Emaj?


1

You're asking for the wrong thing. Don't ask for scales and modes for selecting notes randomly, as if that was "jazz". It's not jazz, it's just dumb and it sounds like what it is, random rubbish. The tune in question is not modal anyway, it has an actual chord progression. Find out where the tonic, i.e. home note is in each section of the song, and is the ...


1

This site has a lot of good information about scales, as well as diagrams of where they fall on a piano keyboard. This site is a good reference for notation, intervals, etc. The way to get faster at it is to keep studying it until it becomes automatic. To get to where you want to be, study what intervals fall where in the different modal scales. Start with ...


1

I have been asking myself the exact same question as you. I study classical guitar, and I first played scales by accidentally touching the other strings. Like other people said, this did not alter how the scales sound, so there was no apparent, immediate need to avoid touching the neighboring strings. However, I later started to practice other Etudes ...


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