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5

There may be no reason not to explore 8+-note asymmetrical scales: the various bebop scales are derived from diatonic scales and often contain 8 or more notes. Points of interest in these scales include the insertion of chromatic passing notes in between the familiar notes of diatonic scales such as the major scale. Granted, bebop scales are most commonly ...


4

Music theory usually attempts to describe what has commonly been done in a particular musical practice. If you're seeing a lack of discussion of scales with more than 7 notes, it's because such scales are uncommon or perhaps have no recognised status at all in the music you're studying. That doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't experiment with such scales ...


3

The quick answer is yes you are right. Guitars are chromatic and thus would have all the same pitch classes as any flute would have. However, guitars being Western music instruments, and Native American flutes being Native American instruments, might not be using the same size of intervals so some notes might not match exactly. But then again it is quite ...


2

Check out Persichetti - 20th Century Harmony chapter 2 or other more advanced (as Tymoczko's A Geometry of Music or Kostka's Materials and Techniques of Post-Tonal Music). There's a lot of ways to treat these big scalar materials. Usually, as it was 20th century classical music standard, you break them down into smaller sections based on equal divisions, ...


2

There is a D# major scale. However, the D# major scale has 9 sharps (including E#, B#, F## and C##) which makes it very hard to read. The enharmonic equivalent (Eb major) only has 3 flats (Bb Eb Ab) and is much better and preferable. Ask yourself this question: Would you rather play a piece containing the notes: D# E# F## G# A# B# C## D# or Eb F G Ab Bb C D ...


2

In the common practice period, at least, melodic inversion was a common concept. But note that this was often done with adjustments to the inverted melody to make it fit a recognized scale and/or a predefined harmonic scheme. So the prevalence of melodic inversion needn't necessarily lead to the discovery of scale inversion. And indeed, as far as I know your ...


1

The keys refer to pentatonic minors. So the A flute will play A C D E and G.Those notes also match up with C major pent. The G gives G B♭ C D and F, also usable as B♭ maj. pent. And the F♯ will work with A maj. pent. So, it will depend largely on which keys you and your accompanists want to use. There's also the propensity to use minor pents over major ...


1

It appears that a dizi in D is easier to play than the others, and a lot of traditional music is written in that key. So there's a solution. I'd have advocated buying three or four, but they aren't cheap! Good quality, at least. Having had a look around, there are cheap ones available for £10-£20, so it's feasible to buy those three or four for some people, ...


1

I'm not certain I understand what you're actually struggling with, but here goes. You know 'the CAGED system' and use it to play chord shapes, arpeggios and pent. scales, but only in key C. For me, the CAGE(D) system works for chord shapes only. I must have learned everything else in other ways. Its use in chord shapes is that there are 5 basic shapes on ...


1

It's just a game of maths as far as I'm concerned. For example, take the C major triad - C E G - and think about all the possible places where you can play those notes. Looking at C. E string - 8th/20th fret A string - 3/15 D string - 10/22 G string - 5/17 B string - 1/13 You can figure out E and G yourself... An inversion is just playing the same chord from ...


1

What does it mean to "play the blues" and what is "the scale" or key of the Blues? The blues changes are typically, but not exclusively comprised of all 7th chords on the I, IV, and V. So in the key of C that would be C7, F7 and G7. The fact is you could play C mixolydian, F mixolydian, and G mixolydian changing when the chords change. ...


1

The Blues is a strange term. It includes minor and major Blues. Those notes that are involved in both comprise nearly all of the notes available from the whole gamut of chromatic notes. Let's be more specific. C major blues notes are C D E♭ E♮ G A , while C minor blues are C E♭ F G♭,G, B♭. That leaves just a few notes - namely C♯,A♭ and B that are 'foreign'. ...


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