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38

Put as simply as possible, horns are tubes. Blowing in special ways makes certain notes sound from those tubes. By changing one's embouchure, those notes start at a fundamental, then gradually go up in harmonics. The first notes (in key C) would be C, G, C, E, G.Those notes are the ones we hear when a bugle is played - Reveille, Last Post, etc. Bugles only ...


37

What we call THE pentatonic scale really wasn't created by removing the 4th and 7th notes from a major scale! It pre-dates the major scale. People have sung on pentatonic scales since they lost interest in tetratonic ones! "The five-note system was already considered archaic by the Greeks in 350 B.C. and [was] employed long before that by the Chinese." [...


21

The fourth and the seventh are the only tones that distinguish the different major and minor modes (not including locrian). The pentatonics represent the common tones in all these modes. Ionian, Lydian, and Mixolydian all have (1, 2, 3, 5, 6) in common. Only the 4th and 7th are altered. Similarly for the minor modes. Aeolian, Dorian, and Phygian all ...


19

It's not fake, it's theoretical. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theoretical_key There is a theoretical difference between E sharp major and F major because they are spelled differently and reside in different places on the circle (spiral?) of fifths. In practical terms, they are identical because they are enharmonically equivalent, thanks to equal ...


19

By very definition, the modes are created by taking the Ionian scale/mode and starting at a different point, not by rearranging those intervals at will. According to wikipedia: Modern Western modes use the same set of notes as the major scale, in the same order, but starting from one of its seven degrees in turn as a tonic, and so present a different ...


19

WARNING: This got a bit out of control. Please don't be intimidated by the diagrams and the wall of text. Also please note that in the following (and in the music, generally) the word "modulation" means just a change of key. Obviously, these modulations are the most common ones. However, you can modulate from any key to any other key without much ...


18

How do I understand the mixture of the major and minor blues scales in an applicable way? The short answer is that the mixing of major and minor tonalities is the essence of blues. Many people draw a distinction between "major" and "minor" blues scales, where in C the major blues scale is A C D E♭ E G and the minor blues scale is C E♭ F G♭ G ...


16

There are two different questions that could be read here, which it is not obvious (yet extremely significant) that they are different. One question is "what is the name of the scale consisting of the notes given by the first thirteen harmonics of C", and the other is "what is the name of the scale consisting of the notes C - D - E - F# - G - ...


15

"A minor" is a key. A piece being in a particular key means that the harmony will tend to resolve towards that note/chord, and mostly use notes from the associated scale. But almost all music involves borrowing notes from outside that scale. "A natural minor", "A harmonic minor", and "A melodic minor" are scales. In ...


14

What you're describing already exists. It is known as the Circle of 5ths (or 4ths if you go the other way). The regular diatonic major scale (Ionian) is symmetrical. Repeating symmetry; two identical tetrachords separated by a whole step between (w-w-h-w-w-w-h). Not "asymmetric chunks." Once you realize this and learn to think of scales this way, you will ...


14

A pentatonic scale isn't a major scale with the 4th and 7th removed any more than it's a minor scale with the 6th and 2nd removed or a major scale is a chromatic scale with C#, D#, F#, G#, A# removed, etc. etc. A pentatonic scale is a five note scale. Nothing is missing or removed. One way to generate a pentatonic scale with an additive process is to build ...


14

Music can, and often will, have notes in it that exist outside of the scale of the current key. We call these outside pitches chromatic, and it's these chromatic pitches in the Paganini that led to your question. (In contrast, we would call music that only uses the members of the A-minor scale diatonic, which basically means "in the key.") But in ...


13

I agree with other answers that the speed to practice scales at is the speed where you can play them accurately, evenly, smoothly, and cleanly. Beyond that, when you ask what the goal should be in terms of speed or where "diminishing returns" set in, I would counter by asking you, "Why are you practicing scales in the first place? What are you trying to ...


12

There is no E# in the G# minor scale, but there is one in the D# minor scale. If you look at the chord that is being played, you'll see it's just a D# minor chord. So I think the best way of viewing it is that you momentarily get a little glimpse of the key of D# minor (which is quite "near" to the G# minor since they differ only in one tone -- the E/E#) ...


11

Put me in the "beginner" category. Do others on here find the chord scale theory approach is detrimental to many guitar players learning jazz? My opinion: YES. Not just guitar, piano too. Probably the only place it isn't detrimental is with drummers :-) If you find your jazz standard in people like Charlie Christian, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, ...


11

But A♯ IS in the scale! There are three minor scales- natural, melodic and harmonic. And that note is in both the melodic and harmonic scales! It's there to produce a bit of tension - without it, the closest note under the root B would be a whole tone below. So that note (A) is raised to make a semitone under B. It's like the leading note in the major ...


10

In addition to NickGroove's outstanding answer, this technique is used in jazz to "go out" (depart from the written chords) when improvising. Consider this pattern: C-D-E- F-G-A- B♭-C-D- E♭-F-G- A♭-B♭-C- ... When "going out," it's more common to hear a pattern move around the circle of 4ths than around the circle of 5ths. Sequencing a 3-note scalar ...


10

According to this resource with lists of scale/mode names, some terms for this scale (with semitone groupings 2 1 3 1 2 1 2) include: Mela Hemavati, Raga Desisimharavam, Maqam Nakriz, Tunisian, Dorian sharp 4, Misheberekh: Jewish, Nigriz, Pimenikos, Souzinak (Peiraiotikos Minor): Greece, Ukrainian Minor, Kaffa, Gnossiennes This page suggests the name ...


10

There are two instruments in this recording. In the left channel is a Greek bouzouki, which is a fretted instrument, tuned in typical Western fashion (12 tempered semitones). In the right channel is an Arab Oud, which is a fretless instrument (imagine a medieval lute, but without the frets, played with a plastic pick that looks like a popsicle stick). I ...


10

The Musical Scale Search Tool offers four scales whose notes correspond to the OP, with only one -- C Minor Lydian -- containing the pitches in the order specified. The others would be permutations/modes of that scale. G#/Ab leading whole tone G#/Ab; A#/Bb; C; D; E; F#/Gb; G; G#/Ab; C minor lydian C; D; E; F#/Gb; G; G#/Ab; A#/Bb; C; D arabian D; E; F#/...


9

You can play pretty much anything, depending on context and what has been established both melodically and harmonically. All modes derived from the mayor scale are commonly used: Lydian easily fits any mayor chord Locrian can be played over V (VII m7b5 as diatonic substitution of V7) Phrygian can easily fit any minor chord (using that b2 as leading tone ...


9

Primitive flutes made from animal bone are sometimes found in archaeological sites, and when you try to play them you can get a clue to the type of scales they may have been designed to play. (It's reasonable to assume they made other instruments with other materials, but bone is longer lasting and therefore more likely to reach us in multiple samples, ...


9

Other answers have pointed out that generally 'the modes' refer to the different points at which you can start on the diatonic scale. As to why that particular repeating sequence ("WWHWWWH...") is important, it's because that sequence of intervals creates frequencies that have particular ratios between them that sound harmonious. Not all permutations of ...


9

Common Practice harmony is all about dominant - tonic relationships. About G7 going to C major. It NEEDS the dominant chord to contain the leading note, the seventh degree of the scale a half-step below the tonic so that it can combine with the fourth degree of the scale to make the tritone interval that powers the dominant 7th chord in wanting to ...


9

You can play several different notes with the same fingering, controlling the note with your lips. On a trumpet, starting at middle C, you can get C, G, C, E, G, B♭, C. Then each fingering (or slide position) will move all these notes downward by a particular number of semitones. Note that half-way valve-presses are not used. On a trumpet 3rd valve is the ...


9

You're talking about the difference between pitch and pitch class. Pitch class is a pitch and all its octaves, like C1, C2, C3... A diatonic scale contains 7 pitch classes. Usually people skip the term classes, because it's understood in context. Theoretically a scale has infinite pitches.


9

They're kind of the same thing. (But only kind of...) The Wikipedia entry for Extended chord includes an example of exactly what you're asking: a 13-chord "collapsed" into a tone cluster (though by convention, the chordal 4th/11th is omitted). Interpretation of 2-9 / 4-11 / 6-13 is open to debate There have been a variety of interpretations over ...


8

It exists but probably isn't included as an article because, whereas a scale like Db minor is a flat note with no "simpler" spelling*, E# is enharmonic to F which is a white key and arguably simpler / more common to read. Db minor also has double accidentals. Basically, E# refers to the same pitch as F, and there's not much reason to use E# as the root of ...


8

Let me take a controversial stance: the tonic is always subjective. There is no such thing as one objective tonic at any particular point in a compostition. I'm not arguing that the idea of a tonic is useless, though, I'm just saying that the best conceptual understanding of a tonic (or tonal center, or key center, or a bunch of other phrases that refer to ...


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