New answers tagged

-1

Thank you all for nice thread of discussion. There is some light on that. I shall explain here in most simple and most convincing way. Actually, it is quite easy to understand why it is called as di-a-tonic scale. It basically means a scale with TWO (di) tonic centers. The one tonic (root) note is, (say) 'C' in C-Maj. scale. The second tonic (root) note is (...


0

A pentatonic scale is just a normal 7-note one with the two 'wrong' ones taken out. What we used to call the 'avoid notes'. But restricting yourself to those 5 notes just means you'll play something that doesn't sound wrong, not something interesting. Look at all the available notes (and that's ALL of them!) and think what their place would be over a C ...


3

TL;DR: Find the home note and home chord. Do not play random notes from a single scale First of all, two bad ideas you should try to get rid of: Bad idea #1: Select notes from a scale randomly. Bad idea #2: Use one single scale for the whole song regardless of what's happening in the backing chords. The scale you should think about often changes with the ...


1

It's probably more useful to know why to use which, rather than which to use. As a basic, with Am and C in the sequence, Am pent. and C maj. pent would be a good choice. As it happens, they're exactly the same notes! The pents work well, as they leave out the two notes which can be awkward to fit in: the 4 and 7 of maj. pent., or the 2 and 6 of min. pent. ...


1

This isn’t a very helpful or complete answer but Tchaikovsky wrote a harmony book. It might not cover everything about his technique in particular - it was intended as a text for him to teach from - but you can at least get valuable insight to what he was thinking, particularly where he disagreed with the classical masters. The only example I can think of ...


1

The 'sound good' part is subjective. Those particular notes are part and parcel of the Blues. If ♭3 and ♭5 work (if that's what you want) over I7, then why shouldn't the respective ♭3 and ♭5 (and ♭7 for that matter) work over IV7 and V7? Those particular notes are the key notes that produce the Blues sound. Whether they 'sound good' cannot really be a ...


4

I’m having trouble hearing these resolutions unless it’s a resolution into the tonic For the most part this IS what tendency tones do, they resolve to the tones of the tonic chord. The tones involving the half steps are the real strong tendencies. TI up to DO and FA down to MI. Those movements imply a dominant chord moving to the tonic. You can fill in the ...


1

An interesting feature of Collier's Super...Scale is that there is a half-step between each segment. That is, the final pitch in one segment can serve as the leading tone to the next. That makes for very smooth harmonic shifts. Compare that with some of the "circle of fourths" patterns presented by jdjazz. When the transition is upward (e.g., C-D-E-...


3

To begin with the end of my searches, it seems that the most frequently recommended book covering Klezmer theory (among other Klezmer topics) is "The Compleat Klezmer", by Henry Sapoznik. Here is the blurb from Amazon: (Tara Books). This book is the definitive anthology by the world's foremost authority on klezmer music. Features an in-depth ...


0

You're overthinking it. What composer would care what something like that looks like? Concentrate on using your ears. The sound of the mode comes from the intended tonic by the composer. If I take C Ionian (Major) and emphasize the second degree (D) in a melody, then I'm playing Dorian. If I emphasize E, I'm playing Phygian and so on through the seven ...


3

A mnemnonic for which mode turns into which is numbering them 1-7 but starting from Aeolian rather than Ionian. Every mode reversed is the mode which brings the sum of the two up to 8. So Aeolian (1) is Mixolydian (7) reversed, Locrian (2) is Lydian (6), Ionian (3) is Phrygian (5), Dorian (4) is Dorian (4). As this numbering makes A the first and G the last,...


0

If you go around the circle of 4ths starting with locrian you get loc, phry, aeol, dor, mix, ion, lyd. Then if you keep going you get the 5 hyper modes. (Modes that don't contain the root.) Personally I think it's just a scale that modulates through the hyper modes.


1

The short answer Your fingering is fine as long as it's comfortable for you and allows you to accomplish your musical goals. The longer answer (Note that @hirschme's comment on your question sums this up quite nicely.) Ultimately, fingering depends on context. But for the purpose of running scales, your fingering (versus the standard fingering you also ...


1

I know this scale as "locrian ♮2"


1

A scale is defined by two tetrachords or with other words: by the tones between one octave, whereby the octave of the root (8 => 1) is identified as the same pitch class, and the scale remains the same 9 = 2, 10 = 3 etc.


2

Your example is in fact A natural minor. There are other minor scales with slightly different notes - but still called 'A minor'. It matters not which notes you play - they are all actually the white keys on a piano - any (all) of them belong to A minor. You may have trouble singing a song with A4, B7 and C3 - those are big jumps in pitch! If you start at ...


9

You're talking about the difference between pitch and pitch class. Pitch class is a pitch and all its octaves, like C1, C2, C3... A diatonic scale contains 7 pitch classes. Usually people skip the term classes, because it's understood in context. Theoretically a scale has infinite pitches.


4

A scale can be continued in both directions as far as you want.


-1

Pentatonics. Here, pent. major. In key C, C major pentatonic works well. Especially over any bars with a C chord. That's particularly due to two 'avoid' notes missing. C maj. pent. has C D E G A. Missing F and B. Those avoid notes are so called because they are the ones which can easily clash when played over a C chord. Out of C maj. pent. the C E and G are ...


3

When you compare all the diatonic chords I ii iii IV V vi viio with the pentatonic scale on the tonic C D E G A you will notice that most of the various chords don't have all their tones available in the pentatonic scale. Chords I (C E G) and vi (A C E) are complete, but all the other chords are incomplete. Ex, you can't get the two other primary chords IV (...


2

What makes a Pentatonic scale so "useful" is that you can play it on any scale degree, not just on I chords. The Pentatonic scale has at least one note in each of the chords you listed, so it will never technically be wrong to stick purely to the scale. Now, that wouldn't make for a very interesting jam, but it is a really good starting place for ...


5

In addition to the other correct answers here... It's the third mode of the Lydian dominant (or Acoustic) scale. Lydian dominant = C - D - E - F# - G - A - Bb - C = WWWHWHW Thus the third mode = E - F# - G - A - Bb - C - D - E = WHWHWWW Or, transposed: C - D - Eb - F - Gb - Ab - Bb - C It's also called the Half-diminished scale ().


2

The bottom of your question has been answered correctly. Just to help and give some additional information referring to your comment: I fiddle with keys and not really study the theories and relationships behind them. I might be lacking the terminology to search for. The lacking term you have to look for is: the modes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mode_(...


3

Putting the notes into a better known order gives the melodic minor, rising (or the jazz melodic minor. E♭ F G♭ A♭ B♭ C D. Keeping the same order but starting on its 6th note gives a mode of that. C D E♭ F G♭ A♭ B♭. This mode has a couple of names - Aeolian ♭5 and Locrian ♯2.


1

why would you use one [pentatonic scale] over another? Each pentatonic scale has a tonal center -- a pitch toward which the others are directed. That's how the letter-name part of the scale is derived. So you would either pick a pentatonic scale that has its tonal center in common with the chord you're playing over (say, B minor pentatonic over a B minor ...


4

C D Eb F Gb Ab Bb It's 6th mode of melodic minor scale (it has the same notes as Eb melodic minor).


1

There are 2 common pentatonic scales, the major and the minor. Using the major scale degrees as a reference (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7), the Major pent is (1, 2, 3, 5, 6) and the minor pent is (1, b3, 4, 5, b7). I am not sure of a third but in fact you can create your own 5 notes scales (or 6, or 13 note, ;-)) but removing, adding, altering notes to Do-Re-Mi... ...


1

As @user1079505 already commented, the minor pentatonic scale contains all the notes that are common to the minor modes (aeolian, dorian, phrygian). So it all depends on the context (that is, the exact chord progression). Normally, if you're playing over a progression in Bm, you would play the Bm pentatonic. Regardless of whether your progression is Bm ...


3

I advice you to learn about modal scales and what modal scales fit what chord progressions. There are many resources about that, in particular in jazz music handbooks. Then you can think of the pentatonic as a subset of notes in the scale. You will understand which characteristic notes from the modal scales are present in given pentatonic, and which are ...


1

Here's a web page where you can enter a chord progression and it will show you which parent scales may be used over one or more chords. http://www.micrologus.com/tools/online_harmonic_analyzer You can then use major pentatonic scales instead of regular major scales, and minor pentatonic scales instead of regular minor scales.


-1

If you know there are 3 pents that work over Bm, then you will know what their differences are. It is pretty well dependent on what chord is prevalent in each bar. You can say there will be bars of Bm, Em and F♯m. There may also be bars of D, G and A, over which those 3 pents will work respectively - they're the relatives, after all. A lot of players - ...


2

Here's a simple Blues idea which illustrates inversions. 12 bar pattern, in key A. On the A bars, play B string 8th fret, e string 9th.Just the two. On the D bars, play top 2 strings one fret lower. On the E bars, play the top 2 strings one fret higher. For a variation, also try 2nd string fret 2 with top string fret 3 on A, down a fret for D, up a fret for ...


1

Triads are important in any genre because they are fundamental. They are key to how most music is composed (generally speaking "harmonized in thirds"). And inversions are important, regardless of how the music is harmonized, in order to smoothly switch between chords. You're talking about the blues. So let's pick any key and think about the ...


3

The notes are in the same order as a C major scale, it's just that the start point is different. The root note, or home, if you prefer, in C major (Ionian mode) is C. All the other notes bear some sort of relationship to that C, in particular, rather than any other note. (Although every note has some relationship with every other). And one main difference ...


3

What makes the modes differ is not the order of notes, but the tonal center. It is a note that feels like home, that resolves the tensions. In C ionian it is C, while in A aeolian it is A. In fact you can often take a melody, and depending on what chords you play along, it will feel like belonging to a different mode. Besides the tonal center in order to ...


5

@MMazzon is right but there is another way of thinking of this and that depends on you. I have a question for you, when you play your A scale over the low E are you thinking melodically in A or E? The reason I ask is if you’re thinking in E then it’s E mixolydian like MMazzon said. If you’re thinking in A then you’re playing in A major with a 5th (E) pedal ...


4

That would be E Mixolydian, because E is the 5th degree of the A major scale, and the 5th degree is where the Mixolydian mode starts. The Mixolydian mode is just like a major scale, but with a flat 7th, so it's associated with dominant 7th chords. In your case, playing an A major scale with an E on the bass would naturally fit an E7 chord.


1

Looking at the chord changes you are playing over and picking out which notes are affecting those changes, then accentuating those notes along with those changes, is a place to start. Here’s an example that focuses on accentuating the notes in Aeolian mode that are not part of the Pentatonic scale. You’re playing over a simple i-v vamp, let’s make it Em-Bm. (...


1

ti->do and fa->mi Minor pentatonic: La do re mi so la Aeolian: adding ti and fa -> la ti do re mi fa so la ti and fa are leading tones: ti resolving up to do, fa resolving down to mi. But both are used as passing tones in both directions, up and down.


0

Firstly bending notes has absolutely nothing to do with playing notes from pentatonic. make no mistake about that. There are two notes missing from Aeolian compared with pentatonic (minor). They are the two notes which are hardest to play in the right place. You need to isolate those two notes, and work out - by listening very carefully - how they fit into ...


1

I would say start by drawing the circle of fifths 2-3 times a day. And probably just do that for the rest of your life, lol. But seriously, if you have the circle of fifths completely memorized it'll tell you all of the flats or sharps in every major key and every natural minor key. From there it's just knowing the alphabet from A to G. Once you've got the ...


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