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12

The Set-Up your guy is talking about usually involves three points: Adjusting the truss rod - neck relief Adjusting the action Adjusting the intonation The truss rod is a metal bar of some sort, embedded into the neck of your guitar. It is used to adjust the curvature of the neck. All guitar necks have a certain degree of curvature - convexity or concavity ...


12

In all the guitars onto which I've put much lighter strings, (dozens, if not more) there's not been a problem. The tension will pretty well keep the strings from rattling round in the slots. Should there be a problem - very unlikely - then a tiny strip of paper will sort it out. Obviously, the intonation will alter, needing adjustment of the saddle ...


11

Change strings, bring it up to tune, leave it or a couple of days. Check neck relief, change using truss rod if necessary. Change action height to preferred, by adjusting bridge/saddles height. Check intonation against 12th and 19th (and 24th if there) frets using harmonics. Re-tune. Leave to settle for a couple more days, while playing it. Go through ...


10

You don't normally need to worry about the nut slots being a little wide - usually the break angle of the string over the nut plus the tension on the string is sufficient to keep the string in place. This assumes that the nut slot has been correctly filed into a suitable (roundish) U- or V- shape - if it's filed too flat at the bottom, that increases the ...


9

It is not too ambitious, guitars are simple creatures and it takes quite some effort to do any permanent damage (namely excessive truss rod adjustment). Basically you slacken the strings then tighten the claw screws till the bridge is held hard up against the body and will stay that way when string tension is reapplied. You don't need to slacken the ...


7

I understand your frustration. The pegs behavior is related with different factors. Most usual factors are: - weather changes (humid/dry weather); - bad adjustment between peg and peg hole; - when the pegs are long periods without being adjusted (because of use of fine-tuners or because the instrument is not played often). Some advices: If the peg sits ...


7

It makes sense for the bridge tuners to be about in the middle of their travel (a couple of turns in from the top is recommended) while the new strings are being tuned using the head machine heads. That way, any subsequent adjustment at the bridge will be available, up or down. Maybe the tech didn't do this, but should have. Yes, your plan should work - and ...


7

Why not try it yourself. If the difference between a professional tune up and a new similar guitar is negligible you have little to lose. The experience will be priceless. Reading your Question again I noticed that you have recently changed the strings. If it is a Strat and you have fitted a different gauge you may have to adjust the bridge height.See Here ...


7

Ahhh the old "it's your faulty playing technique" response from the guitar tech who did the set up. I've heard that one before too - but did not fall for it. You should not have to alter otherwise proper playing technique to get your guitar to play buzz free. Sometimes positioning of certain phrases you play will necessitate placing your finger farther ...


7

You have a few options depending on how much you want to spend and how you might use the equipment in the future. The ideal product that was invented for just the scenario you described is the JamHub Bedroom available at many music specialty stores at a price of $299.99 US. It allows up to 5 musicians to plug their instruments into one of the 5 stations ...


7

It appears that the top string has a problem on fret 14. The fretwire is too high. Or - fretwires 12 and 13 are too low. Either way, the string is sounding from 14 when pressed at 12, 13 and 14. Second string has the same problem. The third string is odd, in that with the same problem, the note heard should be A! It might be salvagable by raising the bridge,...


6

Your guitar may need to be "set up" properly. This means getting it into its best playing condition, and in particular, it includes adjusting the height of the strings above the fretboard (called the "action"). If the action is too high, the strings will be difficult to press down, just as you are experiencing. If the action is too low, the strings will buzz ...


6

While @RockinCowboy's points are all good, in reality you do need to play close to the fret - playing your finger in the middle between frets is not going to work. Your fingers should all be tight up against the back of the fret. If you ever try playing a scalloped fret guitar, you will see just how badly wrong it can go, but this holds true for all guitars....


6

Many folks think it's a rather simple operation of just tightening the nut on the truss rod, but actually it is recommended that the neck be clamped in a jig that causes the neck to be bent backwards the desired amount and then tighten the truss rod in order to hold it in the newly desired position. Many a truss rod has been ruined by trying to force the ...


6

Any vibrato is set up as a balance between the strings and the springs. So once that balance is achieved, it shouldn't make much if any difference whether they're .008s or .013s. Obviously the bendability will be different, but that's a different issue. You may also need to check action and intonation.


5

Firstly, all, not some, guitars require neck relief. This is simply because the amplitude of the strings vibration is greater nearer the midpoint of the vibrating length. Of course if the action is set very high this may not cause any problem in the same way high action will hide the effect of poor fretwork or a warped neck etc. The risks when adjusting a ...


5

This looks like a hardtail Strat bridge; definitely not the "Tune-O-Matic" of a Gibson. I've had intonation issues before that seemingly defied a solution. Here are some suggestions: First, what's the difference in tuning between the 12th fret harmonic and the 12th fret itself? You need to make sure the problem really is in the saddle length. Pluck the ...


5

Your guitar will tell you the answer. It will respond with action changes, and those may be within your realm of "normal", or they may exceed that and become undesired. With the lighter (original) strings installed, did you measure the action in order to quantitatively assess the change in tension? Do you have a new measure with the heavier strings for ...


5

A new set of strings will never be a bad idea - unless it's a couple of hours before a gig or an exam. Replacing like for like should mean the intonation stays as is, but it's always worth checking anyway. A set of decent strings are around £6-7, and a cheap set maybe £4-5, so it's hardly going to save the manufacturers if they put a cheap set on. And, as a ...


5

Is there a benefit to using fresh strings on a guitar that arrived pre-strung out-of-the-box? At the risk of stating the obvious, it depends if there's a problem with the strings - or if the strings are the main problem! Many instruments, when they come new, have set-up problems much more serious than the strings. Should I expect tension or intonation ...


5

It depends It's not always necessary, but is a good idea if any of the following are true: The guitar has been sitting in the store for a long time and has been played by many shoppers and its strings are really old. You like the guitar but not the setup or you feel it could be more playable. I've definitely gotten setups on new guitars, and some stores ...


5

Okay, here's your answer from a luthier. Yes, if you change from .10 gauge to .12 gauge strings, assuming that all strings are thicker in this proportion, then there will be 44% more tension on the guitar for the same tuning (because tension is a square factor of diameter at the same pitch). It's a logical consequence that this means more wear and tear on ...


5

Even a really cheap guitar and cheap amp these days should work consistently, from new. If not, back to the shop! If second hand, you don't know its history - it may have been dropped, have a dry joint (prime suspect) etc. Always also consider the humble lead - often a poor quality example in packaged kits. The wattage of the amp is no guarantee of quality, ...


5

I don't like that I have to switch out my guitar every single time I want to play over my amp or audio interface You might look into getting either an ABY unit or a direct box that has a "thru" output. Try to get a decent one to minimize the tone suck that could occur (Radial does these type of products well). So you'd plug your guitar directly into the ABY/...


5

Depending how far you might want to get into this, there are some books by author-guitar tech Dan Erlewine on guitar maintenance and setup that explain in detail, step by step, along with what tools are needed, and how to deal with problems one might encounter in the process of doing a set-up. I found his books very helpful when I started setting up my own ...


4

Your string height isn't important here - as you can tune to whatever tuning you like and have the string height to meet your preference. What is important is the exact length of the strings, which alters the intonation Have a look at this question on intonation to check yours and to set it up correctly.


4

In my experience (all over Scotland) it comes down to one of two ways. Either try them and see how your guitar comes out, or use my preferred option: Ask the opinion of guitarists you know - ideally ones who play similar guitars/style to you. If a few of them recommend a particular guitar tech and can tell you why, then you should have reasonable assurance ...


4

Eventually you might want to get a better guitar. But your Fender should be easy enough to set up yourself. The two fattest strings are more prone to buzzing because the oscillation pattern of those strings is wider than the thinner strings. Changing the string gauge in either direction (heavier or lighter) could potentially contribute to such a buzz. ...


4

The short answer is that lighter gauge strings will be easier to play and easier to get clear tone when you fret the notes. Most beginners and even many seasoned guitarist prefer lighter gauge strings. But going from medium gauge to extra light gauge will probably create the need for a new set up. So let's talk a little about "set up" for acoustic ...


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