Hot answers tagged

8

Your 'minimum requirements' are "Does it have enough plugs, sockets & knobs to do what I need?" After that you tend to get what you pay for, but on a logarithmic scale… ie twice as good costs 10 times as much, or, to avoid the pedants who don't think that classes as truly logarithmic… jump from amateur to pro & it will cost you 10 times as ...


3

Start by re-setting the neck - with lower pitch comes lower tension, so the strings may be affected by the action. A high action will necessitate the strings having to be pressed harder, sending them sharp. Using the 12th fret harmonic is a time-honoured way to check against the fretted 12 pitch. That's of course after putting on a new set of strings, as old ...


2

I'm more experienced with Telecasters than Stratocasters, but I see this problem with gauges much higher, such as .013s trying to get into standard-neck baritone territory. I took off the low-Es spring to gain some space, but it seems impossible to have blues-rock post-1982 if you can't intonate a Strat in Eb. Taking it to a luthier for a setup is a ...


1

Yes. It doesn't take much computer power by today's standards to record a few tracks of audio. And the Focusrite is a competent interface. You could probably get just as good a result with a mic half the price though. Above a certain price level mics might sound different, but not really 'better'. Have you got a really nice-sounding room to record in? ...


1

I cannot be definitive, as I'm not a Strat guy, but later G&L bridges have a set screw to force the saddles together so they resonate.


1

I do not hear a resonance can you provide more info on the time where it occurs, you are playing many notes. You have to ask yourself what could resonate on a solid body electric? This is typically something that happens on an acoustic. What I hear is a possible fret buzz, and based on the wave file it isn't that bad. If tweaking the bridge didn't help you ...


1

There are systems like the Steinberger Trans-Trem that are supposed to allow a chord to be in tune through a dive-bomb, but for the Stratocaster, it isn't in the cards. In a video for Musicians Institute and Guitar World, Carl Verheyen describes his setup for a floating Strat bridge, giving him a minor third on the G string and a whole step on the B. I think ...


1

If you're hoping to get all strings to stay in tune with each other whenn playing a chord (E major pulling up to F major, and dropping down to E♭ major when the vib. is pressed), forget it. You can get the mechanism to balance (somewhat) by adjusting the springs underneath, but with only two springs, it's only going to be approximate. Put the middle spring ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible