22

If you look closely, you'll see that the 4 and 6 have slightly different font size and orientation. The 4 refers to the finger, the 6 to the sextuplet (in the next bar you can see that the "6" is above the staff). Writing them next to each other is a terrible idea, as the "6" could have been written on top just like the next bar, and the ...


11

The circled chord in bar 11 is wrong: the lowest note should be an F-flat. From the published first edition (from imslp.org): There's also an error in bar 16: the A-natural should be an A-flat.


8

There are two alternative notations for 31-TET. One of them uses double sharps and double flats: Note name A B♭♭ A♯ B♭ A♯♯ B C♭ B♯ C D♭♭ C♯ D♭ C♯♯ D E♭♭ D♯ E♭ D♯♯ E F♭ E♯ F G♭♭ F♯ G♭ F♯♯ G A♭♭ G♯ A♭ G♯♯ A Note (cents) 0 39 77 116 155 194 232 271 310 348 387 426 465 503 542 581 619 658 697 735 774 813 852 890 929 968 1006 1045 1084 1123 1161 1200 The other ...


8

This notation is incorrect, but it does save space here (better would be "col 8" or "col 8vb" but "+8vb" or "col 8vb" are often used): the E should be played in octaves exactly like the bar before. In the piano part for the piano and orchestra version the octaves are written out.


7

Yes, it's a misprint; it should be the same as the preceding chord. (See images below.) However, in an interesting twist, Richard Zimmerman, who was the first to record Joplin's complete works, plays a variation not represented in the OP edition or in the editions below. Measure 11, as well as its repetitions at m. 15 and m. 43, he plays the F♭ major chord a ...


7

Generally, you don't notate for 31-edo. Recall that we don't really notate for 12-edo either, otherwise there would be no such thing as enharmonics. Rather, as long as you intend to use it for tonal 5-limit music, you should mostly notate for meantone tuning, which can apply to both 12-edo and 31-edo. I.e., you notate in diatonic tonality, just as you're ...


6

I believe you're missing an important point: melody is not just a succession of notes, it is a timed succession. As you pointed out, with the same "list" of notes you can get drastically different melodies depending on the duration of each note (and rests!) related to the others. The horizontal/vertical orientation that is often used for harmony/...


5

It's just a visual aid to show that widely (vertically) spaced notes or chords are to be associated with a particular voice/hand. The clearest example is in the Rachmaninoff Prelude in C# minor. In m. 52 it is impossible to play all four staves exactly as written. The brackets just clarify which hand is to play which parts. (IMAGE SOURCE: IMSLP) The same is ...


4

I get that harmony is the vertical dimension of music (thinking in terms of sheet music or a piano roll view in a DAW) and melody is the horizontal dimension. If you're really thinking about sheet music in standard notation, or a DAW piano roll, then the vertical dimension is note selection (which in itself is an abstraction of pitch), and the horizontal ...


4

There are various different conventions. One of the more common ones is to incorporate symbols for quarter sharp: quarter flat: three-quarter sharp: three-quarter flat: (Images are screenshots from MuseScore) Of course, to compose in any "style" (using the term loosely here), it's highly instructive to study the scores of existing pieces. ...


4

Errors are hugely common — to the point of being the norm — in "unofficial" scores ("unofficial" meaning, "free, downloadable transcriptions published illegally on the net"). The E in the melody, on the word "Five" is correct. In the first verse, I agree that the chord sounds like A major (the F#, if there, might be in ...


4

Another way of looking at it is the distinction between diatonic and chromatic semitones. Obviously 12-EDO* doesn't distinguish between them, but 31-EDO (and 19-EDO) does. A diatonic semitone ("between tones") is between two note names in the standard major scale, represented by B-C and E-F, and also by implication between F♯-G, A-B♭, etc. A ...


4

It's phrasing mark, and it connect the notes of a musical phrase. In this case it's also showing that the final C in the left hand belongs to the right hand melody.


4

There's no point in repeating the chord symbol if the chord remains the same. Only when it changes is it necessary to indicate the new chord. Which won't have its symbol repeated, but that will continue, bar by bar, until a different chord is needed. Hence the next A, after which it keeps getting played until...the next change. (Which I'm guessing will be E)....


4

Yes, the A chord applies to all of the measures until the next chord indication. That chord in turn (the D) lasts until another different chord is given.


3

Once you start operating outside of standard major/minor scales all bets are off key-signature-wise. Especially in microtonal music, you can "invent" your own key signature as is most convenient to express your ideas.


3

As it was printed in a hobbyist magazine, I think we can be fairly certain they are references to the accompanying text. It's certainly not any sort of optional notation.


2

The reason is about professional play of similar instruments of different sizes (and therefore pitches). Think of "C" as a finger position: you read a C, you put your fingers in that position. If you pick up a B-flat instrument or whatever, then the same finger position will play a B-flat. It's up to the COMPOSER to figure out the right ...


2

Pretty sure this is a dupe, but - the clarinet, like several other instruments, is a transposing instrument. Yours makes the sound a whole tone lower than the music says. So when you see and play a C note, a B♭ comes out. There are other clarinets, but the 'B♭' is the most common. You'll have to either learn to play by transposing up a tone from your music, (...


2

From one answer from this post this seems to be another way to denote the fact these chords should be arpegiatted. This post give this list of musical symbols as a reference where it is precised that this way of noting it is "now uncommon".


1

I wouldn't say that the dimensions of music are "horizontal" and "vertical". The dimensions of music are in your head, so to speak. If we forget lyrics, the usual dimensions (as defined by me personally) humans consider when perceiving sounds they classify as music are: melody : the most prominent single leading idea that could be "...


1

Rather like when a given phrase can be said, using pauses, inflections, etc., to create a very different meaning, so a given list of pitches will give a very different melody when the same is applied. So, no, a list of pitches played in one order, but with different rhythms, could be used to produce thousands of different melodies. And that's without ...


1

Melody and rhythm work together. For the purpose of a rigid definition, one could consider "melody" as the ordered pitches and "rhythm" as the duration of each pitch. However, the two must be taken together: a given "melody" with different rhythms will sound very different; so, too, a given rhythm with a different melody. To ...


1

A6 contains all four of the same notes as F♯m7 - A C♯ E F♯. The lowest note of those doesn't necessarily make the name. If A is the lowest, the chord could be A6, root position, could be F♯m7 1st inversion. In your copy, F♯ happens to be the lowest note, so someone decided it must have that name. It could just as easily been named A6, in 3rd inversion. Often ...


1

The more usual sign is a vertical squiggly line. Meaning play them slightly staggered - lower before higher. Partially here, it's because of the stretch. Some players might manage the two notes simultaneously, but in any case, the composer wanted it arpeggiated - not played together.


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