29

I could not find an orchestral score for The Apostles on IMSLP, but the same notation can be found in other Elgar compositions, like The Kingdom, which seems to be part of the same edition, so it also follows the same "standard": That score includes a page with the composer's notes, which explains those symbols as his own version of tempo change ...


14

But I don’t understand the numbers. Is it for the fret. This kind of notation is called tablature, and essentially, yes - the number tells you which fret to play. it doesn’t make sense to me, if I’m going to be playing the C chord. The arrangement and finger placement is different. There are many different ways to play each chord - there's not just one 'C ...


7

The first non-pedaled measure can be marked senza ped., the next measure can use either a standard pedal indication as in the question image or con ped., and then another senza ped. for the other non-pedaled measure. After that, con ped. will serve.


5

Chevron above Arabic number marks pitch of the notes with respect to the root of the key. In this case these notes are 6 and 5 in scale of the key. There is one flat in key signature, so the key could be F major or D minor. In this case it must be F major, as D is 6 in F (it is interval of major sixth above F), and C is 5 in F.


5

It's an E natural. The chord is an E diminished seventh chord over an F pedal tone, which leads back to F minor in the next chord. The marking would seem to be Chopin's own, as it appears in the Henle urtext edition (image below), and it is placed consistently at each parallel measure (see mm. 6, 14, and 22). It also appears in the (French) first edition, ...


4

The correct way to achieve this is to use ragged-last to tell Lilypond not to space out the last line and overriding the width of the note lines to the actual line width. Using spacer rests will kind of force the amount of tail space, which is not really optimal. So do this: { c' d' e' f' \bar "|." } { c' d' e' f' g' a' b' c'' \bar "|." } ...


4

Based solely on the natural's position and alignment, I'd also say it's for the E and not the D. It's redundant, but that wouldn't be the first time I've seen redundant non-courtesy accidentals in sheet music from books (I typically see those at the starts of measures, though). Musically, making the natural for the D and not the E destroys the inner ...


2

This question provides a nice complement to Does 3/4 time signature differ from 6/8?. The linked question addresses the "feel" of 3/4 vs. 6/8; the present question addresses the difference in notation. 3/4 as 3 beats per measure; 6/8 as two beats per measure In terms of single beats, a typical measure of 3/4 time would contain three quarter notes: ...


2

Have you tried adding in a spacer rest (s) after the final bar line? Spacer rests are invisible, but take up a space with the value of the corresponding note specified by a number (just like a regular note or rest). Something like: ... \bar "|." s1 You might need to adjust the number value, or use a couple of them to get as much space as in your ...


2

As this is from a hymn, the most likely explanation is that they are accompanist introduction brackets: Source In this example from “A Mighty Fortress is Our God,” the accompanist would introduce the tune by playing only the bracketed sections.


2

The Henle urtext1 gives f♯ and includes no commentary on this pitch — that is, Henle seems to feel there is no question surrounding that note. The manuscript versions2 also give f♯ In addition, f♯ makes harmonic sense — it's the root of an f♯7 chord, which reinforces the cadence on b major on the downbeat of the following measure. 1 Chopin, Etudes op. 10 (...


1

One option: \layout { ragged-last = ##t } According to the docs, the last line will then simply take its natural horizontal length. That means that, unlike the score shown in the question, the staff lines will end at the final barline, leaving only blank space to the right. If you want the staff lines to continue, it's probably better to use spacer ...


1

The primary instruments in the main theme (0:26 as you said) are the violin section. You can tell it's violin and not viola because of the timbre of the F natural at 0:40. Hope this helps.


1

I assume this is plucked guitar strings without any active muting. Hence the notes will continue to ring out, but won't really be "held" in the same sense the other instrument might do. I'm not sure why it's been written the way shown (as two seperate voice), but if you rewrite it as a single voice (removing the unnecessary tied notes etc.), it is ...


1

(0 3) 1 & (0 2) 2 & 3 & (3 0) 4 &


1

This question was originally closed but I lobbied for reopening and posted a comment with the info below. Since it was reopened I’m converting my comment to an answer. It all comes down to grouping of the notes. 3/4 is simply 3 quarter notes but 6/8 is two groups of 3 eighth notes each within an bar and shows an imaginary bar line between beats 3 and 4. In ...


1

Tablature, or tab for short, is what those numbers are. It's an extremely simple notation where each line is a string and the number is the fret to play on that string. Tab generally doesn't including timing information line standard notation does but sometimes attempts to. In cases like these including the chords above the tab is to Help with the basic ...


1

There are a few advantages of having both: the tablature can tell you exactly what to play the chords help if you want to transpose. With the tablature, it's easy to transpose up with a capo, but it's not too easy to transpose down when open strings (0 in the tablature) are used. working on a specific tablature might help with a few similar songs, but ...


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