29

To briefly expand on @Tom_C's answer (thanks to @Guidot's comment below): There is no notation for lengthening all notes of a chord; each note has to be dotted individually. More expansively... Both dots are required, because there are situations where you play two (or more) notes together but hold them for different lengths. For example, here's an excerpt ...


15

It means that the two notes are dotted: both of them are 3 beats long. This is the notation for chords: here are some examples here.


15

They are sextuplets - 6 semiquavers in the time of 4. They probably thought it was obvious enough, since they are grouped clearly in 4 crochet beats.


12

This is a cadenza. The lack of barlines is, as you suppose, because Beethoven intends the performer to play in a rhythmically free, quasi-improvised manner. The pitch durations are intended to be suggestive -- relative to each other -- but not necessarily exact. Another example is the opening of Chopin's Etude in C# minor, op. 25 no. 7. Notice that there is ...


9

First what is the purpose of the chord's names above the staff? They denote the harmony of the song, in case you want to provide a fuller arrangement, or to play it with other people. They can even give you a hint regarding which underlying chord shape is under the current melody / lick. Also if you look at the first E note ( third note ), how I am ...


8

8/8 is sometimes used for music where the 8th-note groupings are consistently not 2+2+2+2 - i.e. NOT a traditional 'four in the bar'. There's also 2/2, for when the half-note is the main beat. In marches and show tunes notating this as 'Cut Time' is more usual. Even, very occasionally, 1/1.


6

Writing chords over staves is very common - it gives the rhythm guitarist or piano player information as to what accompanies the piece. As far as notes on frets/strings and numbers on tab, yes, of course you could have played that E on 2nd fret D string (or 7th fret A string, or 12th fret E string instead). On guitar there will usually be several places you ...


5

"What does it mean when a dotted half note has two dots instead of one?" It means the note is lengthened by half its value, then by a further half of that. So a double-dotted half is a half plus a quarter plus an eighth. But what you showed us isn't a half note with two dots. It's two half notes with a dot each.


4

I would say three things: System position. Basically people think bass clef for the left hand, treble clef for the right hand. But, clefs can change. The grouping of two staves makes a system for the grand staff. Rather than clef type, it's the system position that matters. The lower staff is for the left hand and the upper staff is for the right hand. ......


3

The score clearly indicates E double sharp, which enharmonically equals F sharp, as you pointed out already. As to why so many people play an E (single) sharp: I can only speak for myself, but as soon as so many double sharps come into play (especially in a context with two billion ledger lines) the kind of reading you’d do when sight-reading (relying more ...


3

I see someone is learning Enter Sandman. Classic riff. Most music for electric guitar has both stave and tab notation. As you say, this makes it easy to find the right fret on the right string. Classical guitar music tends to be just stave. On that, notes to be played on a specific string have the string number marked next to the note; you are expected to be ...


3

The staff notation tells you what notes to play, but doesn't instruct you HOW to play them on guitar. (Though, in context of the notes around it, it's hard to see where ellse you could have positioned that E?) As you say, the Tab notation adds information specific to guitar technique. In this case, I think the chord symbols are just for reference.


3

Considering your other question (24 16th notes in a 4/4 measure; Tuplets?), I suspect that the alignment here is correct, and that these aren't true 16th notes but rather triplets. That would mean that the first part of each triplet should be a sixteenth rest, which would of course be aligned with the bass eighth notes, and that those rests are not shown ...


3

They already can, see a piano roll for instance: You do not have a 3d plot, but a 2d (pitch + duration) and color (velocity).


3

Thank you for including more information, it is very important to see and hear things in context, like knowing the key and time signatures in order to be able to give an accurate answer. The notes happen at about 3:56 and are at the top of page 4. The arrows indicate shifting the positioning so the 1st finger extends towards the nut and playing the F and Eb ...


3

I‘ve never cared about this. I think they edit all songs in treble clefs, maybe because pop singers are not all used to read bass or tenor clef. (Most pop songs for male voices are in a higher range than Bariton while the girls mostly sing lower, say in the same range.) I was wondering if it's even a thing that sometimes the vocals won't exactly match the ...


2

Your example song, "Feeling Good", was first performed in 1964 by Cy Grant in key of B minor. The score you show is in E minor. Michael Bublé sings it in Eb minor. Nina Simone sung it in G minor. The octave in which the melody is sung seems to be a minor detail here. It is common for singers to transpose the song to match their vocal range. As I ...


2

There are almost certainly ways of plotting musical notes in 3D space that could be interesting and revealing. I'm pretty sure the masters would not be saddened by people wanting to view their work from another perspective... the x axis can be used to denote the tone (C,D,E,F,G,A,B) as numbers, y axis can be used to plot pitches ...but that seems rather ...


2

There might an error and the 16th notes are 32nd notes. Or the 16ths might be tuplets. I'd notate it like this in the former case: ... and like this in the latter case:


1

Take a good look at the stems on the notes. Some point upwards, some downwards. In each bar, there are two dotted crotchets. Bars 1,2 and 4 they all have stems down, and bar 3, stems up.Count them and it works out right - 2 x 1 and a half = 3. Now look at the other notes, including the notes written on top of each other. They all amount to 3 crotchets per ...


1

In the first Am chord, all except the lowest A note are quarter notes, of which there are 3 in each measure in a 3/4 time signature. This probably makes sense to you if we for now ignore that low A and the dotted E (the 2 on the D string in tab). The trick is the dotted A note in the first chord, which has the length of 1.5 quarter note. Looking at the ...


1

Every line and every space corresponds to a single note. The blue letters correspond to the line next to them and the green letters correspond to the space next to them. So you can look at a line or a space, follow it to the left and you can read which note is is. If you read the letters from bottom to top, they are (A) - B - C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C - [...


1

Lines and spaces are named after the note occupying that line or space (green are the spaces, blue the lines.) Whether it is sensible to give names to blank space, where only a ledger line can provide orientation is another question.


1

Each line ansd space has a letter name dedicated to it. That name never changes. On the treble clef, the name of the note on the bottom line is E. Space above, F and so on. You'll see notes below (and above) the staff, and they are sequential, too. So hanging under the bottom line will be D, and sometimes there will be extra little lines under that - ledger ...


1

Because of the 8th note rests in both the treble and bass clefs on the downbeat the first 16th and 8th should line up. After that every other 16th should line up with an 8th note. You can also keep each hand in their respective staff by changing clef or using 8ba or 8va if you choose. The blue lines indicate notes that happen simultaneously:


1

Actually it occurs to me that even though music is very well represented in 2D and pitch should only be one axis like others mentioned, a legitimate 3rd dimension could be the actual volumes or dynamics of notes, which is something that is represented with letters on a score (ppp, mf, fff etc) or colors on a computer piano roll (see @moonvave99’s diagram). ...


1

Check out "A Geometry of Music", by Dmitri Tymoczko. Also, in this context you created, axes for pitches and tones show the same information.


1

It's called a courtesy accidental. Look at the measure before: The B-flats are naturalised there. But they have to be flat again in measure 41: The extra flat in measure 41 is to remind the player that the B's are flat again. So you just play a B-flat there. Successive identical accidentals are never added together, a B-double flat would be depicted with ...


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