15

Yes. One of the most widely respected and utilized sources (at least in American universities and professional circles) for the precise parameters of standard notation is the book Behind Bars by Elaine Gould. Many universities in the US have that book in their music libraries and several professional organizations, such as ASMAC, refer to that book as one of ...


14

There are a few different things this can mean, and they aren't always mutually exclusive. But they all relate to a fundamental weakness of musical notation: it's impossible to specify everything the performer should do without completely cluttering up the score. Understanding the implied style of performance. When Beethoven premiered a new piano sonata, ...


11

The Music Publishers Association published a style guide: "Standard Music Notation Practice". It does not address notehead size, but it does address other visual parameters. For example Placement of note heads and accidentals: (a) Many musical symbols slant up from left to right at a uniform angle. It also addresses issues such as stem lengths; ...


11

The strict rule is that key signatures are re-stated on every stave. A change from x sharps or flats to zero sharps or flats will be marked with one or more cautionary accidentals at the end of the preceding line. (We used to add 'cancelling naturals' when moving from, say 2 sharps to 3 flats, but modern practice only uses them when moving to NO sharps or ...


8

When I studied music in college, there was a term that was thrown around an awful lot: "intentional fallacy." The idea that the performance of a piece could be more authentic if you could understand the mind or intentions of the artist was very strongly resisted. I'd agree with that about 70%. However, AS A PERFORMER, trying to figure out the ...


7

The general standard is to place the key signature at the beginning of every line. However, it's very common in lead sheets to place the key signature only on the first line. In that case, the key signature does apply to the whole piece (unless explicitly changed, of course).


5

Usually, that is the way the same note is written, when both soprano and alto voices sing/play the same note. In other words, for the rest of that treble clef, there'd likely be two distinct lines, one with up stems, the other with downstems. Up for the soprano part, down for the alto. That's all assuming it's an A in the treble clef. Were it the bass clef, ...


5

Look at this version of "Amazing Grace" from the Gather 3rd edition hymnal. It uses the same version of the melody as your sheet music. Link to image source


5

Quite often - usually - when something like this occurs, playing through in both options (there will only be two - with/without key sig.) will give you the answer. One will sound good, the other... In real/fake books, it's usual to state the key sig. on the first line only, just like you'd find with the time sig., which usually, in all music, doesn't get ...


4

'Tr' means 'trill'. Play the note and the diatonic note above it alternately. As in DCDCDCDCD, quite fast, while the lower two notes are held only for the short quaver shown. I'd be playing it with two hands (left hand is doing nothing else), so E and G l.h., trill,r.h., whichever fingers you are better with - the suggestion here is 5434, but there are ...


4

Another consideration is the articulation that you want. Sometimes you may prefer an open string rather than a fretted note because you want the note to ring out more strongly. Sometimes you may prefer to play the note fretted on a lower string so it can be stopped or muted more precisely. Aaron's answer is pretty good to start with, but there is also a ...


4

The are some artworks that use a kind of nothingness to get the supposed art object to redirect a person's attention to the surrounding environment. Or at least that's one way to interpret such art. Rauschenberg's White Paintings or Cage's 4'33" are examples. I suppose if someone goes hook, line and sinker for that kind of thing, they might apply it to ...


4

You can take two approaches to this sort of problem, where the tune and the words aren't a good fit. You can take the tune as fixed and distort the words to suit it. Or you can modify the tune to suit the words. For the version of the tune you've shown us, and the traditional words, what's shown in @Edward's answer will be required. To suit the words, ...


4

David Rowland, the author of "A History of Pianoforte Pedaling" (Cambridge University Press, 1993), suggests the script "Ped" mark may have emerged in the late 1830s with the publisher Breitkopf & Co. This is based on early Chopin editions found at the Chopin Variorum. He further proposes that Breitkopf might have received new ...


4

That indicates a "first ending" and "second ending". You play from the beginning up until the repeat bar, including the part under the 1. (That's the first ending). Then you go back to the first repeat sign, and the second time through you skip the first ending and jump to the second ending (2.). So for your first example, you'd play ...


3

Kicks over time can be shown by placing an empty "staff" above the drum staff. Rhythmic slashes can be made by changing the note head style, and hiding the stems (or not). \version "2.18.2" %% Chord Progression chordProgression = { \new ChordNames { \chordmode { c1:7 | f1:7.9+ | d1:m7 | ...


3

The chord below G is G7 but without the 3rd (B) in it. It hints at the B in the notes running up to it (B-C). Tr is short for Trill the act of playing 2 notes repeatedly and quickly. You're struggling because it calls for the 2 weakest fingers to pull off this particular trill (4,5). Play it slowly and your fingers will eventually obey you :-)


2

I've always considered "play what's not written" in three ways: Why did the composer write X instead of Y? The composer wrote forte (for example). Why? Why not piano or mezzo piano or fortissimo or any other dynamic? Why, in the first place, was it important to be specific about any dynamic at that spot in the music? How does changing the dynamic ...


2

When there are multiple options for the same note, you can choose the one that best fits the context. Taking the example of an A written on the bottom space of the bass clef staff, it could be played with the open A string if the preceding note is nearby on that string or in a nearby position on another string; but it could also be played on the E string if ...


1

To me, the "why" and "how" part of the piece is the part which was not written, and maybe more specifically where are the most important points in the piece, how does the music build to those points, how should the important points be ranked. In other words, how does the music function which then means one's performance must support that ...


1

If all the notes are shown by color, why use staff at all? The main problem I can see is that it would make transposition nearly impossible. Each musical key has certain relationships that are normalized with key signatures. But how do you go from key of green to key of yellow?


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