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21

This line refers to the I, not to the "Allegro". As OP mentioned in the comments, the I stands for the first position, i. e. the first fret on the guitar. So the line means, that all notes under it have to be played in the first position.


10

First thing to do is to listen very carefully, and establish wher in the bar any of the main notes come - the emphasised ones that in a standard 4/4 bar would arrive on beats 1 and 3, and then work out what happens on beats 2 and 4. That will give a fair idea of placement of some of the notes. 29 seems odd (it usually is) so is there a possibility that the ...


10

Not associated with the time change, just coincidental. On guitar music, there's often a Roman numeral printed to suggest a good position on the neck to play that section. Here, it's the scale of the F Mixolydian mode, starting from 1st fret bottom string. So a sensible position to play all the notes would be starting o that very fret. Although, promoting an ...


9

That looks like guitar music (single staff, G clef, Arabic numbers that make sense for guitar fingerings). If so... It gives you the position that passage is to be played in The Bb note in the preceding measure can't be played on any of the five lowest frets. Given the fingering for that note and the ones that follow, the music is indicating third ...


7

The cross motif is also to find in the BACH motif: A cross motive (chiasmus) is a popular musical symbol, especially in the baroque era. It consists of four notes that follow each other in such a way that you get a cross when you connect the outside and inside tones. The most famous cross motif is B-A-C-H, the setting of the name of Johann Sebastian Bach. ...


6

Yes it works the same way for all the ledger lines as well. Here is a pic that helps you out: The notes move stepwise like they do on the main lines of the staff


6

The notation starting in the second measure, isn't a tie, but rather a slur. More specifically, it's a phrasing slur indicating to play everything within that slur as a continual line and within a single phrase. You only need to play that quarter-note A in the second measure for the duration of one beat. And your intuition regarding the brackets in the ...


6

I think the first thing you should ask yourself is whether notating this rhythm as eighth-note triplets is actually necessary. Could this just as easily be done with two measures of 12/8 followed by a (only slightly unusual) 5/8 measure? Only if there’s another instrument playing straight eighth notes, or something else about the context that makes eighth-...


2

I agree with @Tim that figuring out where the emphasis falls is definitely key. The other key question is what is supposed to come after those 29 notes — maybe there is a plausible remainder of the 3rd measure. Or maybe the first 5 triplets were an anacrusis to the first measure? The kind of music I can think of where 29 triplets could constitute a complete ...


2

The order just keeps continuing below and above the staff like on the staff itself, but have in mind that you shouldn't use too many ledger lines, because it can be hard to read for example a note that is 8 ledger lines above the staff... In this case you would write 8va or 8va to indicate that the notes are played an octave higher or lower than written. ...


2

Yes. Moving from a space to a line or a line to a space is one letter up or down. So the first line is an E. Right above it the space is an F. Next line up is a G. Going down from that first line (E) is a D. And then below that you need to add a little line called a ledger line and it would be middle C. Below that first ledger line would be a B and then if ...


2

Don't think it makes much difference. It's actually where I prefer the snare to be - leaving the spaces for three toms and a kick drum. But more often, the 'x' is used for cymbals and hi-hat, even though the more important part is the stem and any tails indicating quavers/semis, etc.


2

Is it common to combine multiple voices in one piano staff... Yes, but stem directions should be used to indicate separate voices and rests should be used so that each voice has complete rhythm values for a measure. ...that might not even fit the time signature? If the rhythm values for a voice don't fit the measure, that's a notation error. I'll ...


2

or did you mean this cross? If you look at this original score page you can see a cross ... The melody of Am Stamm des Kreuzes geschlachtet (slaughtered at the stem of the cross), the second line of Decius' chorale, is shown twice in red ink, without the words, on this page of Bach's autograph score: in the middle of the page for the ripienists, and in ...


1

there are plenty of different note heads available in notation programs. Except of the drum-set and especially when all other percussion instruments have their own staff the selection and definition doesn’t matter and doesn’t mean anything. The different shapes of the note heads are only important for the composer and the conductor of the ensemble to ...


1

In my opinion, an experienced euphonium player should be able to read tenor clef. It's expected of trombone players, and plenty of euphonium plays also play trombone music, so they should have spent the time learning tenor clef. And if you're writing something that's this high so consistently, I'm assuming it's written for a more advanced player. Ergo, ...


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