19

These are both shorthand notations that refer to music occurring simultaneously in other staves. The first notation (the slashes) simply tell the performer to "do exactly what the other violins (the staff above you) are doing." This is especially clear when you consider, for instance, the following two portions of the score: This is just a practical ...


11

They refer to non-tonal/non-harmonic sounds; be it drum sounds (these sounds don't follow a harmonic structure), or dead notes on a string instrument, or, as is the case in this example, rap (the rapper speaks the words without tuning them to a specific pitch). This is useful for notating rhythm parts that don't really have a pitch. It's used instead of "...


9

You could try something like this, using just repeat signs and volta brackets: |-1.,3.-|-2.,4.-| || intro ||: A | B :|| C :|| outro ||


7

The convention for ornaments is that a sharp or flat will affect only the ornament, and not other notes within the measure. So in your example, any note written in the C space will be played as a C natural - but if there is a second mordent in the same measure, the C in that mordent will also be sharped without needing an additional accidental. This rule ...


7

It is the same as the "standard" notation for tenor voices, written using the G clef and sounding an octave lower than written. The vestige of a C clef on the 4th line (i.e. a "tenor clef") is an indication that this isn't a standard treble clef. The more common notation is a small 8 below the clef. Looking at the music in the score makes it clear that is ...


5

It hasn't six quarters in a measure. It's two separate voices written on the same stave. Tails up is one, tails down is the other. Justin is one of the better guitar gurus on the net - thorough and knows what he's up to. He's tried here to make the timing clear - you read it right - in that the notes fit in between each other, if you count 1&2&3&...


3

I grabbed a file from imslp.org and found your measure. It is a simple mordent.


3

I've seen classical pieces that handle modulation both ways. It really depends on the length of the modulated section... but in the classical era, accidentals are more common in my experience.


3

The trends I've seen are that Baroque music usually does not change key signatures mid-piece despite modulating to various keys, while Romantic music often does change key signatures accordingly. For Classical-era music, sonata-allegros often do not involve any key signature changes despite key changes being crucially important to their structure (the most ...


2

An example of a Beethoven sonata that does not change key signature within a movement is the "Moonlight" sonata, Op. 27 number 2. An example that does change key signature within a movement is the "Pathétique" sonata, Op. 13, at the beginning of the development section of the first movement.


2

They are not ties. They are slurs. It just means play then legato. Note that the bottom notes are also held longer, suggesting a melody in the bass.


2

To answer the Lilypond part of the question: as Tim mentioned, they're two voices on the same staff, so that reflects what you need to do in Lilypond. When typesetting classical guitar pieces with Lilypond, I usually use 3 separate voices and put them on the same staff. Here it clearly needs only two. I would recommend you to use a structure like this ...


1

The only tie shown is between the two G note (3rd and 4th). The lines are slurs - phrasings. The bass clef has stems up and down to show that the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes are held longer than they would be with only up stems. It's written as a three part tune - treble clef os top, bass clef/stems up is middle, and bass clef stems down the lowest of the three. ...


1

Comparing editions, we can see that one of them marks so-called "artificial harmonics" with the open-diamond mark. The other edition has "A3" there which presumably indicates the same pitch to be played (A three octaves up), and indirectly this requires artificial harmonic compared with the written note there. I don't recognize "Vi-" (and there's no ...


1

They're probably not rehearsal letters because those are helpful only when there's more than one performer, while this is a solo. In the half dozen editions and arrangements of Nel cor piu non mi sento that I found online, some modern, some ancient, none included such symbols. So these symbols are unlikely to be musically important. They may be peculiar ...


1

Elaine Gould in "Behind Bars" (the standard reference for modern notation) writes: A thin square bracket is recommended as a secondary bracket for joining the following staves: - two or more like woodwind and brass instruments; alternatively, two or more of the same instrument - two staves and/or additional lines required by a single percussionist ...


1

I've seen dashed slurs used in wind sheet music to indicate that the player should play through the phrase instead of taking a breath.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible