7

The first (and second) bar are odd. It would add up if the first two items in the LH - the rest and the chord, were 8ths rather than quarters. A misprint, or just rule-breaking? Did the composer want a 5/4 bar? Or maybe he wants a half-bar triplet, as in bar 50. I suspect the latter. But we shouldn't have to guess. BAD composer! Apart from that bar, it ...


6

This is 4/4 time with triple 8th and triple quarter notes, but the triple sign is lacking in the first 2 bars shown on the beat 4 (with the triple 8th rest) and it should be notated also in the r.h. in the next measure (analogous to the l.h.) Bad lay out, unclear notation. But there’s no doubt about the intention to me. The placement of the note heads is ...


6

The first two are repeat brackets. The bracketed section is played twice (at least). The third is a hand-written quarter-rest (not an easy symbol to draw; some hand-written scores even draw a mirror-image eighth rest for a quarter rest; usually causes a double-take during sightreading.)


4

The first two are winged repeat barlines. The 'wings' are common in commercial and jazz copying styles, making it easier to see the repeats when sight-reading. I've been known to emphasise them further with a red pen! You haven't questioned previous appearances of the rather scruffy hand-written quarter rests, so I guess it's the opening parenthesis ...


1

The top ones are repeat brackets. Usually, they don't protrude beyond the five lines. Whenever I have a new sheet to read, the first thing I do is make them look like the ones from the Real Book, with a highlighter. Any further ones get adapted likewise, but with a different colour. Just makes reading so much easier. The last sign is a crotchet (quarter) ...


1

My understanding is that old plainsong was deliberately non-metered. According to a book I have about hymnody the purpose was to distinguish it from secular, metered music. The quote from the book seems to reinforce that idea by promoting a flexible approach to rhythm: "...allow the singers freedom of rhythm..." He also says the various notes used ...


1

You don't count note durations in these bars. The way they're written makes them uncountable. Whether it's written in 4/4 or 12/8 doesn't make a lot of difference - were it written properly. Of course it will sound like 12/8 in parts - that's what the triplets do. But that's not the problem. It sounds a little (to me) at the point in question that there's a ...


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