New answers tagged

0

A two-against-three is sometimes called a "hemiola." (Next time you see it in a trivia game, you'll know.) You can always work out polyrhythms by taking the least common multiple of the two voices, and working out where the notes hit. So, with two against three, the LCM is six. Count in sixes. Both voices hit on one, the three hits on 3 and 5, and the two ...


8

You might be able to use implicit tuplets if the groupings stay consistent throughout a significant section of the piece. Notate the first couple measures explicitly and let the musician figure it out from there (most moderately skilled musicians should be able to handle this). (Optionally, to make it more clear, you may want to add 'simile' or 'sim.' after ...


11

Probably the same as the keyword "shuffle", but wouldn't the below example get your intention across? Edit: Another option is to indicate the triples for the first bar, then use the word 'simile' to show the idea is to continue this for the reminder of the piece: https://musicterms.artopium.com/s/Simile.htm A directive to perform the indicated passage ...


14

You'll see it done in all of these ways. 12/8 is the obvious answer. Straight 8s plus a 'Shuffle' instruction is useful if you're writing into a notation program like Sibelius - but you have to make sure 'Shuffle' IS defined in the Playback Dictionary. The third way will be understood by live musicians, but will confuse computer playback. I recommend ...


2

I'd write it in 12/8, it's easier to write. And to read. And it will be interpreted the same.


6

The 'rule' about not crossing the centre of 4/4 time is an old one, but a good one nevertheless. It makes reading easier - which after all is what writing music out should be about. Personally, i'm happier reading things like this with ties, where it can be seen simply that there's syncopation. However - since the sound of drums generally don't have any or ...


8

The basic rule is not to write a note which "crosses" the mid point of a bar in 4/4. Either of your bars 3 and 4 are OK, and 3 is usually easier to read. One exception to the "don't cross the mid point" rule is if the whole bar is syncopated, like the last bar in the example below.


4

Both are correct, but the 3rd bar looks more tidy and natural.


1

As Tim answered, the stem directions are likely incorrect. For how to play it -- on which beat to play which note head -- see how the note heads align with those in other staves. This looks like the left hand part of a piano piece. Align it with the right hand. Look for similar patterns in other bars.


1

There are no half notes with flags here. Notationally, there are two voices. The lower voice is moving in half notes. The half notes have downward-pointed stems to indicate that they belong to the lower voice, but these are somewhat hard to notice because of the X marks. These half-note stems have no flags. The upper voice is notated in eighth note ...


2

They are arpeggios, and the minims (2 beat notes/half notes) are a sort of accompaniment, being played and kept hold of, so they continue to sound, until the next one gets played. It's common to actually hold down the whole chord (all the notes involved) and play them so they all continue to ring out. Normally, each would be stopped in time to play the next,...


4

The F and D notes really ought to have two tails - up and down, as it appears (to me) that although they're written just in the tenor part, they belong in the bass. Either that, or re-write the tenor notes (F and D an octave higher) as dotted crotchets (quarter notes), and the lower F and D with down stems. But as far as playing, the order of notes is clear.


3

I'd guess you're trying to improve readability by reducing the use of ledger lines? below or above? The thing is, the piano is an instrument which is notable for it's range (on paper, a wider range of pitches than a standard orchestra). So pianists have to handle these a lot, and most will be used to reading off either end of the score (depending on their ...


0

You can select "file", "export" then select "Midi". Then open that newly saved midi file. All the fingering is gone. If the song contains a Capo, you need to remove it before saving as a Midi file but have it keep the fingering, this is done under Tuning.


18

Certainly not the first. The second is unobjectionable. But why not the third? It's the standard notation, and is just fine.


7

I'd go with the second or the third, depending on the clef that you need before and after this passage. The first one feels more uncomfortable that the others.


0

Yes, you could call this 'two against three' pattern a simple example of Polyrhythm. Not sure why it's so important to label it? More importantly, have you a strategy for PLAYING it? The count is 1 2-and 3. The 3-group hits 1 2 3. The 2-group hits One and. Practice it tapping two hands on the table before trying to play it.


1

I grabbed copies of a couple different editions from online warehouses, and none of them had a big "A" in the 4th variation. As Caters wrote, it is most likely a rehearsal mark (tho' pretty silly to have one in such a short variation). Compare with "A" placed below the notes in the 3rd variation, which you noted you already understand.


0

All the answers shared above are good. I’ll just like to add a bit of help to make it easier for you to remember. Think of all intervals within a major scale from the root. (Think C D E F G A B C) Categorize them into 2 groups: Group A: PERFECT (Members: 1st, 4th, 5th, 8ve) default: Perfect half step smaller: diminished half step bigger: Augmented ...


1

I think a good way to get a handle on the terminology of intervals is to understand first the relation of internals to a tonic in the major/minor system. After that you can then apply the terminology to any interval. It's sort of a diatonic to chromatic approach. Let's assume a tonic of C and a major scale. The various degrees (tones) of the scale have ...


1

Diminishing means made the perfect or the major intervals smaller by half step as well In contrast to Laurence Payne, I'm going to say that the preceding statement is not correct. The correct statement would be Diminishing means made the perfect or the minor intervals smaller by half step as well So, for example, a major sixth comprises 9 half steps. ...


1

You could look at the matter in a simple way: The intervals 2nd, 3rd, 6th and 7th can be either small or big. Small ones are called minor, big ones major. The small ones can be dimished, the big ones can be augmented. The perfect intervals can be either diminished or augmented. (Exception: the perfect unison can not be diminished.) EDIT: I wrote the ...


0

"Diminishing means made the perfect or the major intervals smaller by half step..." Well, sort of. Using 'diminish' with its everyday meaning of 'make smaller' you're quite correct. But there's a special musical meaning of 'diminished' when naming intervals. Start with a major interval. 'Diminish' it by a half step, it becomes a minor interval. '...


5

Figured bass written when it was a living notation is often not so neatly formalized as modern figured bass used as a teaching aid for learning common practice harmony. Also, most music editions published in this era have plenty of typos, so if something seems totally incomprehensible, it may just be nonsense! The horizontal lines are continuation lines, ...


0

The shortest answer is: it isn't by musicians. There are 4 beats per clave. Dancers count in 8 because it's easier to count 'one two three four' than 'one and two and'.


3

In MuseScore, click 'Show MIDI import'. You'll see that the Left Hand piano stave is above the Right Hand one. Select it, click the down arrow, click Apply. The RH and LH staves will now be the right way round. Or do it in the Instruments page.


1

The exchange of clefs is the smaller problem. Worse is the wrong representation of the rhythm in your version! the best way to correct bad midifiles is to play it in yourself by taking some useful information you got by this bad notation. this version is in dm but there are wrong enharmonics e.g. Bb is enharmonic A# (as a result of the wrong key assignment),...


0

The clefs and left hand right hand switches throughout, that's how it appears in your example. You could try this editing fix in Musescore. Add two new staffs below the existing staves. Add a new treble and bass. Cut and paste bars from the existing jumbled staves into the appropriate new staves. After all the music is copied into the right place in the new ...


3

In the Musescore edit view just press "i" to open the "Instruments" dialog. Then you can rearrange the staves.


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