New answers tagged

0

In TAB notation, whenever there are legato sections of tied notes, you should pick / strum the first note of the set and then use hammer-ons and/or pull-offs to sound the other notes. In your first example, if you follow the notation exactly, you should fret the note on the eighth fret on the low E string (using your middle finger), pick it, then hammer-on ...


0

First part, yes play 8th fret, hammer-on 10th, pull off to 8 again (keep a finger on fret 8 ready for the pull off). The G/F♯ semiquavers are played alternating, as written, on the bottom string. The other numbers are strange though - frets 30 and 31. Maybe it's harmonics on the top 4 strings, but the actual music notes are off screen high on ledger ...


0

A side note: the notation here (diamond a Fourth up) produces the 2-octave harmonic. You will also see other harmonic positions. This table is copied from Dolmetsch online dictionary position of little finger ------ pitch of 'flageolet tone' produced 5th above stop ----------one octaves + a 5th above the written note 4th above stop ---------...


7

You can tell, here, from way the numbers are written. The upper group shows 2,3,4 going up, just like the fingers on your right hand. The lower group shows 2,3 going down, just like the fingers on your left hand.


5

These are harmonics. In this case, they're called artificial harmonics because they're not on open strings. The player fingers the low (regular) note, and also places a finger at the point that would finger the diamond note but without pressing down. This results in a harmonic two octaves above the fingered note, which is indicated by the small black note ...


11

This is a chord of 5 notes: The fingerings for the r.h. usually are written above the notes, and the fingerings for the l.h. below the notes! There's absolutely no reason that you couldn't play this chord only with one hand c=1,d=2,f=3,g=4,a=5 (r.h.) but you can also play a cluster of 3 tones with the fist (r.h.) or 2 neighbor keys with the thumb (r....


40

The left hand has wandered into treble clef territory here. You'll play the bottom two notes with the left hand, and the other three with the right hand.


6

Unless you are one of King Henry's wives, you don't need to worry too much!! The '6' there is indicating six notes in the time of four. Like double triplets.Called sextuplets in the trade. It looks like a slightly different font from the fingerings on the music stave - and again different on the tab. The lower numbers are the suggested fingerings.


0

The easiest way to do this would to write "Play twice" at the top.


14

As mentioned in the other answer, it is convention, but there is a bit of logic behind the convention. A time signature of 3/4 is taken to mean that there are three quarter notes in each measure, so the fact that there are six eighth notes in a measure of 3/4 follows from subdividing each of the three quarter notes into two eighth notes. Logically, a time ...


8

It is convention. The two are different, even though mathematically they contain the same amount of notes. In 3/4, the count is 1-2-3,1-2-3.Simple time. Thus, as you state, there would be 3 beats, each containing two quavers. Since 6/8 is compound time, it will be written out differently. It's basically two 'beats', each comprised of three quavers.So it's ...


2

Although not all engravers make the distinction, it is common to place ties and slurs differently. A tie should be placed between the note heads, while slurs should be placed conspicuously above or below them. In this case, the curved marking is quite conspiciously above the note heads, implying that it is a slur even though the pitch doesn't change.


10

The notes are not tied. This is relatively conventional notation for portato, which is rather like a "sticky" staccato with longer but still detached notes.


9

This is called a grace note. Its duration can be stolen from either the note before or after it, depending on the stylistic context. I think the slash is intended to indicate "as fast as possible".


1

It is C♯! The piece is in key A major, and that has its key signature at the start of the line, including a ♯ sign on the C space. It only needs to be there to tell us that every C in the piece must be C♯. EDIT: The key of the piece is A major. The chord/s in each bar are chords formed by the notes in that bar, or the chords which can be ...


3

The typical use of square brackets is, to indicate an addition made by the editor, but not present in the original (urtext, in that case of the piano duet; this is actually by Dvořák and preceded the orchestral version (see Wikipedia). Its first printing can be found at IMSLP). Your proposed meaning is in my experience only expressible as text (e.g. "2nd ...


1

Place all the poems together in the front matter. This lets someone who's investigating the text independently of the music do so for all the poems together, instead of having to leaf back and forth. Placing each poem before its song would be slightly more convenient for someone who's interested in only one song of the cycle.


0

Your expectation was correct. Since the F in the right hand of the thumb is written as a dotted quarter note, it should technically still be playing when that left hand plays the high G. The performer in the video is using some sustain (either with a pedal or a particular sound) and as such is allowing themselves to be a little sloppy with some of these ...


0

Indeed,as many users have said before me, the arrows were used to indicate a low fingering than usual, which was surprising to me, as the piece was not a beginner string piece. So, the answer came as a shock, as none of my pieces that were of lower level than this piece has the arrows. Thank you to all those who had spent their time to answer these ...


1

It's not 'correct' use of 1x and 2x brackets. It's occasionally done in song copies where 'writing it out' would mean a LOT of extra bars, paper and therefore expense. In this particular case you could do this. (But it isn't always that easy!)


0

As another answer said, this isn't really standard notation. A few alternatives: Have a second staff above or below, usually in a smaller size font, with the a notation for "2nd time." That's probably overkill, though, unless you have a lot of significant variations to put into a score. Since the two repeats differ by only a single note, you could put the ...


2

How similar or different are the music for the 1st and 2nd times through those 8 bars for the other instruments/singers? All parts must be notated with the same repeat-volta arrangement, so that if someone says "let's start again from bar 9" (or whatever) everyone has the same notion of where in the music that is. So it might be necessary to write all the ...


0

The down- or up-arrow is often pencilled in by performers to indicate intonation (as in, "this note should be played lower [higher] in pitch than feels natural"). I've never seen it actually used in printed music, but that would be consistent with the context of those four notes in the example.


-1

I suggest it's telling you which string to use. In the passage that starts D up to A, you'd play those on the open D and A strings. For the following descending G F E you could then switch back to the D string - but you'd quickly need to change down to the G string to play the C. So in the first passage the down arrow means that instead of the D string, ...


2

Beginners of violin playing are used to learn first little melodies in major on the E, A and D string: the motifs like DoReMiDo will be (analog to Guitar frets) 0,2,4,0. The arrows above F, Bb and Eb are assigning that the finger position is now lower compared by F#, B and E. So I agree with Lars Peter Schultz, additionally trying to show the pedagogical ...


4

The arrows could refer to the finger positions. The first E-flat is low 1st finger. The second one low 4th. If the F you mention is on the E-string it is low 1st, if it is on the D-string it is low 2nd. And so forth. It is common in violin sheet music to indicate low finger positions with down arrows, especially in music with pedagogical intention. EDIT: ...


-1

It is probably a reminder of the notation rule that a flat at the same pitch lasts for the whole measure, but any other octaves of the same note have the pitch indicated with their own accidentals.


0

If this sheet is from you and you want to find out what chords would fit to this music (apart of this rudimentary fifth) you should learn the basics of chords and triads, as you won’t make any progress by asking for chords to each melodic pattern. But if this bars are parts of a composer who knew what he wrote and why he just wrote this block chords of ...


8

My guess is that these aren’t negatives, but just dashes used to show that a shift is necessary to use the suggested fingering. For instance, maybe you are playing an F# on the E string and then need to play a C a tritone higher. I might give the fingering for the C as –2 to indicate that you should use the second finger, but that this will require a ...


1

Now that I'm playing a trumpet, I realize that playing with the horn directed at the music stand will make it sound muted. Holes might give me something else to shoot at. While On-Stage Music Stands web page attributes their holes to save weight, the reason I would switch has to do with sound. It just doesn't seem to be enough weight or cost savings just ...


0

I think you want to be mindful of chords in isolation versus chord changes. You can make simple associations like: major = happy minor = sad or angry diminished = shock But when chords are put into context with other chords you get more complex expressive possibilities and can even contradict the simplistic associations. all major chords connected by ...


0

Well, you get to look before you buy! Piano/Vocal/Guitar will be a 'song copy'. SATB and piano will be an arrangement for chorus. Neither will be a 'full score' of the original recording.


0

I do this type of stuff alot but I know music theory. There's a lot moving parts (no pun intended) here. There is a lot of good advice above. Here's mine: 1st of all if you do not know the song and how it sounds AND have a good ear, there is no foolproof way to know if you assigned the correct chords short of someone like me reviewing it. Many times in ...


0

As other answers have said, there's no magic formula. Different chords in different contexts can have a different "feel" about them. For example, major keys will generally involve playing quite a few minor chords during a piece, but if they are passing or part of a sequence, they won't often have a separate "sad" feeling -- they'll be subservient to the "...


1

The notes in the staff would likely restrict the "chord shape". If you simply had the letter names of the chords above the treble clef you would be free to choose how they are played for the most part (even chord names indicate an inversion when properly notated). What you need to do is transcribe the bass clef so that all the notes are in the treble clef ...


3

For the most part, using chords shouldn't be about what sound you want, but what purpose the chord has, or where it lies in the key signature. For example, you would probably use a m7b5 or diminished triad as a leading tone chord if you wanted to as a dominant functioning chord, but you wouldn't just base a m7b5 or diminished chord on the fourth scale degree,...


2

There is only one way: learn existing songs and arrangements, see how they use chords in relation to melody and rhythm, and how it makes you feel. Theory might give you ideas about which aspects to pay attention to and how to organize it all in your mind, but ultimately it’s a matter of taste and you develop a taste by tasting lots of things.


0

Even if there rules and receipts they would be opinion based. If you want to learn some historical features concerning melody, chords, rhythm expressing emotions you should listen to early Madrigals, Bach Cantatas and other works, romantic songs of Schubert, Schumann, Brahms and Operas of Wagner, Verdi, etc. and study and analyze chords and harmony. Make ...


2

In this particular case the job is easy. The LH has a simple series of open 5ths. We can assume these are the root and 5th of the chord. So bar 1 and the first half of bar 2 are a B♭ chord, moving to an A♭ chord in the second half of bar 2. Now look at the melody. If the first chord was B♭ MAJOR we'd expect to see some D♮ notes....


6

Work out the chord shape? That's not always possible from piano music to guitar. Work out the chords themselves is easier. First is to establish what key the piece is likely to be in. Here, with 5 flats, it's either D♭ major or its relative B♭ minor. You can read the dots, so in the first bar, there's predominantly B♭ F and D♭ notes. ...


1

This an exercise named DU STYLE which is No. 2 from Trente Six Études Transcendantes pour Trompette by Theo Charlier published by Alphonse Leduc. Lucienne Renaudin Vary performing DU STYLE


6

Since you can read the notes, you can quickly work out that the first bar is Bbm. Half was through the next bar might just be Ab or potentially Absus4. Then the next bar Gb7. You have to analyse each bar or half bar. There will be passing notes and extra notes that don't need to be included in the guitar chords. You have to decide what sounds right to ...


3

The left hand part is just power chords (= root + fifth) so you can probably get away with just playing the root note (since the fifth is implied by being present in the overtones). If you want to play full triads, then look to the key signature and the melody to find whether it's a major or minor chord.


1

The straight line could be a glissando or a portamento. A portamento is a smooth change in pitch - like you'd do on a trombone, violin or swanee whistle. A glissando is what you'd do on an instrument like a piano or xylophone (instruments that only allow discrete pitches to be played) to give the impression of a portamento. You can't do a smooth pitch ...


2

Yes, a slide up to the note. Not a connection from the previous note, but a new start. The notation of this piece, though it superficially seems meticulous, is actually rhythmically illiterate and would be very difficult to read.


9

It's a bend: an articulation mark representing a brief flattening of the note.The note is attacked in tune but is immediately flattened - by up to a semitone - before coming up to pitch again.


13

That is a bend or a dip. You make a clear attack on the note and then do a very slight glissando around a quarter or half step down and then return to the original pitch.


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