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2

The reason the notes and time signature seem not to match up is that there are two separate "voices" happening simultaneously. This idea is discussed in Too many notes in this measure and linked Q&A. To identify the two voices, just know that the dotted quarter notes are one voice, and the eighth rests/notes are the other. GuitarPro allows ...


1

I want to thank everyone for their answers and help and I am sorry about being late with getting back with you. What I actually ending up doing was adding a variable above all of the rest that had the "silent voice" with all of the break information in it, like this: systeminfo = { \new Voice { s1*8 \break s1*7 \break s1*...


3

The notes, as answers state, are a chord to be played simultaneously. OTOH, when the composer wishes for the notes to be played sequentially (the word is "arpeggiated"), there are symbols for them. Here's a simple example: As pointed out in a semi-duplicate question, the default direction is to play lowest to highest. If the reverse (highest to ...


2

Sight reading music is very similar to reading any other written language: symbols represent sounds. When you learned to read you started making those associations by learning the alphabet. First you had to recognize a letter, then you had to associate it with a sound, and finally you put those sounds together to interpret the written word: "c...a...t.....


6

The notes are stacked like that to tell they all get played simultaneously. That's why they're on top of each other. If they were spread out, they would be played in order, from left to right. They're not, so they all get played together. The low F at the bottom of the bass clef, also gets played at the same time as the first chord (triad). That's due to it ...


11

Those 'stacked notes' are called a 'chord'. You can read the notes in the chord in any order you like, but you have to play all of them simultaneously. In case it's not obvious: the right hand plays the quarter notes.


2

I'd like to supplement the reasoning behind this: Note heads take space, and chords are typically sharing the stem or in absence of one are placed above each other. If the note heads would overlap (due to very small interval between them) the first remedy is, to keep the note stem common and imagine one note head pushed to the other side of the stem (see ...


5

They should be played together. They're just spaced oddly like that to accommodate the presence of both E and E#. The reason it's E and E# (as opposed to, say, E and F) is because of the previous E-F# dyad. For the notation in question, the E is a repeat of the previous E, and the E# is the lower neighbor to the F#s on either side. Looking at it as two ...


2

In addition to Ramillies's great answer, a similar tool that may be helpful is specifying how many systems you want on your page. In your paper block, include systems-per-page = #4, for example, to have exactly four systems on each page. But this can be problematic depending on the nature of your score: if the instrumentation changes often from dense to ...


4

A \break or \noBreak in any voice affects the whole system. I just have a special variable in all of my Lilypond files that contains only spacer rests with those breaks set up, and I put it as a voice into one of my staves (it doesn't matter which one it is). Here's a lilybin example: http://lilybin.com/walvlh/1 . By the way, I'd say it's a good idea to ...


0

I want to recommend a book that I've been working through for the last few weeks. It's a step-by-step guide to sight reading on bass. Since I've been using it, I've made tremendous progress, where every previous attempt I've made to learn how to read music has ended in me quitting out of frustration. The author breaks down the process into such small, easy-...


12

The measure comes from solo of "Nothing Else Matters" by Metallica. The first warning sign is that it is notated in 6/8 while the original song is in 3/4 (but see the edits below). This suggest the score is not well written, and indeed there is a mistake in the measure you quoted. You can find better rhythm notation in this video: ...


10

Usually when a question mentions "too many notes", it means there are multiple voices. The 1/16th rest looks like it might belong to a different voice. EDIT: The question did not mention "Nothing Else Matters" when I wrote this answer. If you look at the accompaniment guide written above the staff, below the chord symbols D5, C5, G, F#, ...


34

While the point expressed in user77817's answer is an important part of the story, it isn't the whole story. Furthermore, the premise of the question is oversimplified, if not simply incorrect, but the answer fails to challenge it. It is, therefore, misleading. Much of Bach's surviving manuscripts were indeed produced as performance materials, but Bach ...


4

Based on the recording provided, the score is incorrect. In the left hand, the notes accompanying the right-hand's Gb should be C-Gb not C-F. (Actually, both right-hand and left-hand should be F#; see below.) The chord comprising beat 2 (Ab C Gb Eb) is an augmented sixth chord resolving to the G chord on beat three. The "correct" spelling would be ...


2

There is an F natural in the bass with a G flat in the treble, a minor ninth. If you disregard the F natural and change the G flat to enharmonic F sharp, then you would have ascending the chord Ab C F# Eb arpeggiated of beat two. That could be heard as a dominant ninth in 4/3 inversion. It does move to a G chord next, so that makes sense. The "odd" ...


3

First, I guess the author meant "... in particular that CHORD...", instead of "... that NOTE...". Second, the chord IS ACTUALLY a CMaj⁹ chord. It's easier for a guitarist (guessing he's not proficient in harmony) to place the fingering shape of a G⁶ chord, finger 2 on 3rd fret. However, for a full PIANO part, and much more if to ...


4

Listen to the track. This phrase occurs at 0'50". I'm sure I hear two different chords. Which means the piano part is correct. The chord symbol is wrong. Or, if you want to be polite, an over-simplification. Now, what the actual intention was is another matter! When that section returns near the end of the song the guitar plays something a bit ...


5

As far as I can see, the arranger has written the following: Singer, sing these lyrics with this melody Guitarist, play this chord Pianist, play these notes I don't recall any rule that states that if a guitarist plays a G6 chord, then a pianist absolutely must not play a C note, even for a fraction of a second. Chord symbols are not a harmonic analysis: ...


3

If I follow your question's concern, I think you are expecting the chords symbols to be... C/G then G6 or Gsus4 then G6 ...because of the C in middle staff, first beat. But the chord symbols are there to show what a guitarist should play rather than some kind non chord tone label or analysis. The chord in this section is G6 and their is a non-chord tone C ...


1

The part that probably isn't clear - and may be played wrong in the Youtude video - is the prelude is actually three separate "voices." Superficially it looks like a bunch of rolled chords, arpeggios. But it's actually like a trio, like three people singing separate parts. In technical terms we would say there is counterpoint between the three ...


5

Nothing specifically to do with guitar technique. It's a general musical instruction. Breath mark. Caesura. A brief time-out from the flow as if you were a singer taking a breath. It DOESN'T imply a fermata on the note before it though.


3

Its more usual use is to indicate where a breath may be taken. Maybe for guitarists short of breath..! Probably a vestige from another transcription of the piece played on a wind instrument. Now more an indication of the end of one phrase, and the beginning of the next, possibly cutting that last crotchet a little bit in length, which is what would happen ...


3

The notes in your picture are not dotted notes, they are notes with staccato dots. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staccato The dot that affects note length is positioned horizontally after the notehead. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dotted_note


2

As Aaron writes, what a "beat" is is defined differently in different time signatures. Within regular time signatures (where every beat is the same) there are two types: simple and compound. Simple meters have beats subdivided into two parts each. Some examples are 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4. Compound meters have beats subdivided into three (usually) parts, ...


1

The timings calculated are correct only if the beat is understood in terms of the quarter-note, which is unusual for sheet-music in 6/8 time, but typical for DAWs regardless of time signature. The time depends on how the beat is represented. In 6/8 time, the tempo (BPM) is sometimes given in terms of the dotted quarter-note and sometimes in terms of the ...


3

A hooked bracket end indicates that the music repeats back. An open end indicates that it carries on. I'd never really thought about the hooked end for a short 'last time bar' that concludes a piece, but it makes sense, and a quick trawl through some printed song copies confirms that it's generally done. Note that the bracket gets a hook because the ...


8

Closing the last volta bracket is unnecessary and can be confusing (except, as Gould suggests, when there is a short bracket at the very end of a piece). In your arrangement, you could get away with the closed voltas in m.39 and m.73 because they are ending a section, but it's better without. The one at m.87 is wrong.


29

By convention, a square fermata has a longer duration than a rounded fermata. It's not "upside down". Traditional notation convention usually tries to put the fermata over the note head, rather than the note stem. If the note is stemmed-down, them the fermata goes over the notehead, and the fermata dot will be below the fermata line. If the note ...


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