New answers tagged

0

There's SO much irritating about that tempo indication! All it needed was 'Swing q=120', or maybe 'swing 8s q=120'. What does 'c.120' mean? Indecision - 'pick a tempo somewhere round 120'? Fluctuation - 'play rubato centered on 120'? FFS just say 'q=120'. It's not as if the police are standing there with a metronome, we're going to play it how we ...


4

plays each 2 quavers in 'shuffle' style 2/12+1/12 instead of 1/8+1/8 That's exactly what he is supposed to do! When you see this at the start of a piece, you are basically told not to play straight eighths, but shuffle eighths (triplets like they are shown above -- that would be 2/12 and 1/12 like you said, although I've never heard anyone call them that)....


2

God, is this a badly written bar. Since it's in 3/2, here is my take on it: Here are the 3/2: So that is one voice on the left hand (pretty clear) and the first voice of the right hand. This would be the second voice of the right hand, which lasts only 2/2, followed by a rest: These just seem to be grace notes not written as grace notes: I am saying ...


2

It's just a fingering. It shows you that you need to play C with the 3rd finger and thus Ab* with the 1st one. You'd also play the low F with your pinky (5th finger). It's quite common to include the fingerings in pieces; it's a way to help the player. Usually, you'd find the numbers on top of the note.From the link I'm providing below, you can see that: ...


0

If you want to go to the trouble, this is one of those times to consider using the sostenuto (middle) pedal. You have to do a couple of things to get it to work properly: Play the first measure with the long F, using the pedal. Making sure that only the F is down and the damper pedal isn't when you do it, put down the sostenuto pedal with your left foot. ...


1

Another technical point: the F on the left side of the line is doing double duty as part of the middle voice and part of the lower accompaniment. This creates a bit of difficulty, as you have to repeat that F on the third beat in the accompaniment, while holding it as part of the middle voice. The line is there in part to call that to the performer's ...


1

The first answer is on the money (BTW quaver = 8th note, semiquaver = 16th note). His or her advice is based on sight readers wanting to clearly see the beginning of every beat (in this case beat 2 of each bar) when 16th notes are involved. You can also substitute a single dotted 8th rest for the 16th and 8th note rests if you like.


1

The line also makes it clearer that the two notes connected with the line should be played with the same hand (the left hand in this case)...although if your right hand can span a 10th, you can use your right hand for both of the last notes in the upper staff (the F above High C and the D above Middle C) while still following the fingering.


1

Like you said, it's just an indication that the voice is changing between the two clefs (F in the bass clef to D in the treble clef). These kind of lines are common when the author wants to show you how the voice is moving between clefs, when there is no beam to connect them (like the two previous notes in your example).


2

I agree with you. If the intention of the composer is the exact rhythm posted, don't use a tuplet. Write out the dotted eighths, so one can see how they line up against the beats. For additional comprehension, one could use both: I've definitely seen scores with the literal (in this case, dotted eighth) rhythm written on the staff, with tuplets stemmed ...


2

I re-articulate the F# with each chord and keep it held through the quarter-note rest while the other notes drop out. It takes a bit of finger juggling to pull off, but will sound much better than dropping the F# out of each chord.


2

Looking at the whole piece, I'd say the the first 5 measures are a rather rhapsodic introduction to an otherwise fairly metrical main section and I think the slightly odd rhythmic notation helps to emphasise this. There isn't a 3rd or 4th beat in the measure, and I don't think that renotating in dotted eighth-notes would help much. Play the first two quarter-...


-2

Any meaningful argument either way needs more context. These two bars don't exist in isolation from the rest of the piece, which we haven't seen. For all we know, the "best" notation might be something completely different, like


3

You’ll better play f# - not f. I would just let drop the note f# in the left hand ... btw: In bar 20 you‘ll have the same problem with the key of E.


0

„measure (bar) 3“ (... 7 ... 13...) We use the bar numbers for orientation: e.g. analysis: The primary theme of the Sonata (bar 1), the modulation transition (bar 13), the secondary theme (bar 14) "Let's start with the transition at measure 13!"


8

This are bar numbers, one possibility of orientation for rehearsals. (Sometimes as here they are written at the beginning of each line, sometimes in regular distance as every multiple of 5 or 10.) Other possibilities are rehearsal marks (see this related question), either big capitals (starting with A, mostly I is omitted in favour of J) or numbers (...


25

I'm afraid the numbers above bars are just called... "bar numbers". They serve as an index so that you can communicate about places in a score when there is no opportunity to point to them. For instance, a scholar would write that the development section begins "in bar 156", or a conductor would instruct the orchestra players "We'll take it from bar 135". (...


1

B♭ chord is the first, third and 5th notes of the B♭major scale. That's B♭, D and F. B♭6 adds the 6th note of the scale. So that's B♭, D, F, and G. Not sure quite how that fits in with the notation you showed us. But that's what B♭6 means. I guess you know what an arpeggio is?


1

B♭6 means B♭-D-F-G (the formula for a major 6th chord is R, W+W, W+H, W, where R is root, W - whole tone and H - semitone). As for arpeggios and how they are notated - I do not know for sure. I play 2 monophonic instruments and rarely deal with this sort of symbols. I think notation depends on time period and what instrument it was written for (I vaguely ...


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