New answers tagged

-2

I would blame the publisher or editor. They can be overzealous when it comes to simplifying things or fill out a page. I did some engraving for a publisher and he made me add sporadic fingerings, dynamic markings and phrasing marks. This was back in the day when Finale was just coming out and most all submissions were handwritten. I remember contacting ...


18

In the interest of keeping this post focused, I'll just address the specific question of... Why did Liszt put fingerings in his transcription of Beethoven's Ninth? First, it's important to establish whether the fingerings are given by Liszt, which they are. Here is the passage given in OP "sample 1" from the Neue Liszt-Ausgabe edition (1993) (mvmt ...


1

The most difficult piano etudes are published in editions with fingers. Why wouldn't this transcription be published in a similar way? In both cases I think the point is to give fingerings for those who are working to attain a new skill level. @ToddWilcox makes an important point about fingerings being (I think usually) the work of the editor.


1

Many times fingerings are a choice of the publisher, not the composer or arranger. Fingerings are quite common in student editions and quite rare in urtexts, although for piano there are manuscripts with fingerings for either special effects or passages seen as particularly difficult by the composer or which the composer wishes to “micromanage”. For the ...


2

The "paperback" and "sheet music" are identical; the sellers just labeled them differently. ABRSM only offers one edition of the WTC I as see in their online store. However, note that there are two editions of WTC II, with one being double the cost of the other. Given the price difference in the Amazon listings, it's possible there is ...


0

I would suspect that the sheet music edition will be loose leaf so that it can be put on the stand of the keyboard instrument, whereas the paperback will be bound so it has a spine (like a paperback book). They’ll be for different usages: the sheet music for playing from, the paperback for studying.


10

Just to put an exclamation point on @LaurencePayne's answer, here's the same measure of the same arrangement from https://hymnary.org/tune/living_for_jesus_a_life_that_lowden


11

It's a weird arpeggio line. Can't think of anything else it COULD be! You've added the information that this was published in 1967. I'm wondering if it was produced with one of those 'music typewriters' that were popular in the mid-20th century before being blown out of the water by computer typesetting. I don't think it's Letraset.


0

It's the same thing. Even if the author uses a single dotted half note like you have suggested, it won'y make any difference to how the piece sounds. However, if you had posted some more from the piece like next few bars, we could analyse more and come into a better conclusion as to why this notation is specifically used.


0

In this age of FINALE and other such notation software, I suspect many people use default settings while hyperscribing and either accept what the computer discerns or they become blind to these things when editing. I think this is a case where the computer made the decision to tie the notes based upon some factor of the arrangers playing and they never ...


4

Most any top classical musician studies a wide variety of available scores, including hand-written copies by the composer, first editions, copies made by the composer's students, and edited version by respected musicians and scholars. Beyond studying the scores themselves, musicians will study other pieces by the composer -- even for other instruments --any ...


3

You occasionally see this sort of thing in ensemble music where the chord changes but one instrument holds the same note. Unnecessary, but might add just a LITTLE useful information. This, for instance: But, most likely, it's just sloppy notation.


0

If the notation works in bars 1 and 2, can't see why it wasn't the same for bars 3 and 4. B♭ gets held for 2 bars, then G gets held for 2 bars. Pointless writing!


2

Both notations are exactly equivalent, so I see no reason for the conclusion to play something differently just because notation is different. I can only guess, that in the next bar more changes happen (eg. change of note for second half of bar), and this notation is the chosen method for indicating it early.


0

Holding notes by keeping the key depressed is only possible when you have available fingers and manœuvrable space. Otherwise, hold them with your foot — using the sustain pedal. :) Sometimes players even use the sustain pedal when fingers are available. The effect on the key you're trying to hold is the same; the only difference is that it causes all keys to ...


2

This notation indicates a musical intention more than a practical possibility unless your piano has a third 'sostenuto' pedal (but it would capture ALL the notes played on beat 1, so probably not an option). Hold the C. Restrike the Eb. The effect will be imperceptibly different to the literal notation.


1

Based on what you've said, there are a low of DAWs (Digital Audio Workstation) out there. Here's a few list from what I know, could do that: (These are free DAWs): Garageband MPC Beats (Though, I think it requires something. You could check it out here) Musescore (Sheet music with MIDI capabilities. Add instruments to your liking. They play back the sound ...


1

This is possible. It works best when you play very accurately - note starts and note durations - to a click. Think 'Capture notation' rather than 'Capture performance'. You can choose a DAW with a Score Edit page (e.g. Cubase) or a score publishing program with playback (e.g. Sibelius). The two types of program have converged to an extent. But only as ...


0

Depending on the quality of the features that you describe ("record" - how? "edit manually" - to what extent? do you need playback do you need? how much control over the layout? how professional the score?), you might get different answers. The DAWs, in general, suck at typesetting scores (the newer ones usually don't even support score ...


3

First consider the larger question of why the arranger included chord symbols at all. They're there, of course, for a performer who prefers to play from them rather than from the "dots". So the "real" chord is as given in the chord symbols, but for the purposes of the piano arrangement, the B (and, less significantly, the E -- the chordal ...


2

It's still a natural. True, the notes at that part of the bar are played an octave higher, but because it's written on that top space, and a previous E was naturalised (?) in the same place, it retains its accidental. A cautionary natural sign wouldn't go amiss, though.


-2

Flats and sharps in key signatures always apply to all octaves. 8va also doesn't affect accidentals, they always apply as usual.


0

Just to fill out Neil Meyer's answer, there are two primary options for handling this ornamentation: Slow option Particularly for a pianist new to trills, you can play them two-against-one to the left hand: Faster option For a pianist more comfortable with trills, start with two-against-one, but then double the speed to four-against-one:


0

Another option is to use the Cut Time symbol -- a C with a vertical bar -- which is equivalent to 2/2 time signature. C without the vertical bar is known as "common time" aka 4/4 time signature. When you indicate Cut Time or double time, you need not change the note values, it is understood that now the notes (and measures) following are all half ...


5

A dot after a note extends the length of the note by half. In this case, the eighth notes are extended the length of 3 sixteenth notes. There's a sharp sign before the dotted eighth on G which means to play a G# (half step above the G.) The note with a slash is a grace note. Depending on the style, a grace note is played just before the main note or "...


2

to understand the notes in the left hand you have to imagine the notes are living in a house with 2 floors above the terrain (r.h.) and 2 floors in sub-terrain (l.h.) The middle -C- is notated on the ledger line, if you play from there upstairs with the r.h. starting with the thumb 1-2-3-4-5 you play the notes c,d,e,f,g etc. like you know. Finger 5 is now ...


1

Is it the same as reading the r.h? Yes - and no. The lines and spaces refer to different notes in the bass clef - which is mainly played using the left hand. The first note on the music is a D. True, if t was in the treble clef it would be a B♭. But it's in the bass clef, and that middle line is where D lives. From that, you can work out what other notes in ...


1

I don't think there's any useful 'box-ticking' approach to this. Just read lots of music. Preferably get into a situation where you HAVE to read lots of music. Work with a singer who has charts. Accompany student instrumentalists in their exam pieces. If you can stomach religion, play piano for the hymns. Anything that requires the skill.


2

After learning the note names in the staffs, lines and spaces - writing down the note names right in the system, use large lines with large spaces! - you need to learn the chords and triads, seventh chords, scales and chords in each key, write down the melodies you have in your mind and your memory. By writing the music you have in your mind and playing ...


11

These lines do often occur in keyboard notation, and I've seen both dotted and non-dotted varieties. You're guess of their meaning is pretty close, but I'd add one further element to it: the lines help the reader track a single melodic line. In other words, the line from the opening G to the next E tells the reader that both of those notes belong to the same ...


8

DC = da capo - go back to the top. Al fine = then play to where 'fine' is written, and stop. Obviously if there are more verses, it all continues! There's really no need for the set of repeat dots at the beginning, as 'da capo' tells where to return to. And because that's written at the bottom, there's no need to put them there, either. There may be need for ...


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