New answers tagged

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Here you go! GP7 Manual and Enjoy


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Here's a way of thinking about it that helps me. You are trying to fit a group of 6 notes into the same space as a group of 4 notes. 6 / 4 = 1.5 So your right hand should play 1.5 notes for every note the left hand plays.


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What you have there are groups of six in the RH against groups of four in the LH. In principle, that's the same as groups of three against groups of two, in other words triplets vs duplets - you just have two sets per note grouping. If you are used to playing triplets in one hand whilst playing duplets in the other, you'll do fine playing them using the same ...


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Each beamed group is a beat, and the two hands have a different number of notes within each beat. You’re playing six notes in the right hand while only playing four notes in the left. The result is that the first and fourth note in each beat of the right hand will line up with the first and third note of the left, but the other notes won’t happen at the same ...


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It looks like that TuxGuitar fails to set the proper clef. Just find the music in the lilypond file and put \clef "G_8" in front of it. That will do the trick. Explanation: As Tom_C correctly points out, guitar is written in treble clef but one octave higher than it actually sounds. TuxGuitar apparently just sets a treble clef (or no clef at all, ...


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This is probably linked to : why is guitar music written one octave higher? An easy fix would be to transpose everything 12 half tones higher but not sure if it easier in Tux or Lilypond...


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Here is a VERY abridged list that I threw together for you of some tunes that are considered Cuban standards. They may not all be by Cuban composers. Some of the most famous boleros associated with Cuban singers are often written by Mexican composers like Armando Manzanero. Some of these tunes can be found in the “Latin Real Book” you mentioned and posted. I ...


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You have the answer in the two systems above the song: primary chords in C major and broken chords. G7 is a tetrad, a chord built by 3 thirds: gbdf. The fifth (d) can be omitted. Look up dominant 7 chords.


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When playing a dominant 7th chord on the piano, it is permitted to remove the perfect fifth. In this case the D (perfect 5th) has been removed and the B has been inverted. It looks like you are using an Alfred book, if you go back a bit you’ll find a section on Primary Chords in C Major.


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A G7 chord contains the notes G, B, D, and (the minor 7th) F. Those two bars, including the melody, contain those notes in the first inversion. The seventh in a dominant seventh chord is minor. Here's an introduction to chord symbols.


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There's a NoteNames context which seems to do what you want. I haven't tested the solution below, but I'm glad you did and it worked for you: scale = \relative c' { c d e f g a b c } \new Staff { << \scale \context NoteNames { \set printOctaveNames = ##f \scale } >> }


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They are open string harmonics, found at various places along the string, each of which will divide the open string into equal parts - 1/2,(12th fret), 1/3,(7th fret), 1/4, (5th fret) and so on. Gentle touching over the fretwire will enable them to be plucked and sound. Look at the standard music portrayed above the tab - instead of 'round' dots, the ...


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Those are harmonics: you very lightly touch the open string at the twelfth fret while playing the string and you should hear a bell-like sound an octave above the open string. The same for <7> except you should touch the string at the 7th fret and you should hear a note a twelfth above the open string. There are plenty of tutorials on the net, for ...


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What you see under the tabs isn't the full standard notation, it's only the rhythmic values of the notes, i.e. the timing of the notes. In other words, the tabs tell you what notes to play, and the rhythmic figures below tell you when to play them, and for how long. In any case you can do this in a couple of different ways: Listen to the original song and ...


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In theory, no. However, it is very useful to learn it as when you get on to harder pieces, it will be useful to know your time signatures and things like that. When I did Grade 5 theory, it was a pain and I cried over it but now, I thoroughly understand every bit of music and how the music should be played. It pays off. But if you don't want to do it, you ...


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These are called duplets. They tell you to play two quavers (8th notes) in the time of three quavers. These are used in compound time-signatures (6/8, 9/8, 12/8, 6/4, 9/4 etc.) where each beat consists of three sub-beats (or sub-divisions). As these time-signatures group notes in threes, a duplet allows you to have two equal length notes in the time of this ...


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I am just about to graduate with my production degreee, which requires quite a lot of lead sheet writing and sheet music digestion, and I had this question pop up the other day on a quiz. What my prof. said (which it still could be a matter of his option when it comes to composition) that you should separate 4-8 bars if possible. Obviously there are ...


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When you were a toddler you learned to speak by imitating your parents. If you were never taught to read, you could grow up fully functioning and be able to navigate your way through life but you would be handicapped to a certain degree. But you were probably taught the alphabet, how to sound out words, how to read, how to speak foreign languages, how to ...


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The short answer is no. You do not need to learn music theory to master any instrument. Mastering an instrument, imo, is more about perfecting your body movements and your physical connection to the instrument. It's about the physics and physiology of you and the instrument. Learning to master attack, and all the techniques available to create a large ...


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What understanding do you have of theory? what kind of concept is in your mind? You can learn hundreds of songs and if you are quicker after the tenth song you have built an implicit theory of songs and theory of learning. Theory is nothing else than an abstraction and reflection of what we are doing: Melodies are built of scales and triads, so you will ...


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You don't have to learn all of this if you just want to play piano. But its still very helpful because if you know, for example, how a cadenza is constructed it will be easier for you to learn new notes. It will improve your play when you know how different parts are highlighted by the use of unique harmonic changes or specific chords. In other words you ...


4

The stuff I find confusing are all the chords and formulas for constructing them. You need to know the formulas for constructing chords in the following situations: if you need to construct a chord, given its type or name or other "specifications" if you need to identify a chord's type upon hearing or seeing it If you're fine with playing only ...


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You could learn to read music just well enough to know which keys to hit when, how hard, etc. However, learning some basic theory might make reading the music easier. Without any theory, you will see one arbitrary bunch of notes, followed by another, and yet another. Knowing some basic theory, you will be able to recognize many common patterns: that bunch ...


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I'll go slightly against the grain of some other answers. In my opinion it depends what you want to achieve in the long run. I've met a number of excellent sight readers and theorists who are absolutely hopeless at improvising. It's as though they're lost without a page in front of them - almost as if they don't hear the sounds they are making. Some ...


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Well, you'd certainly learn the basics of music theory like notes, intervals, accidentals etc. Learning music theory is not actually very important if you don't plan to be pursuing music very seriously. A basic knowledge would serve the purpose of being able to play and impress. So it's your choice if you want to dive into the deep abyss of music theory or ...


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Well, you say you know how the notes and rests work (presumably on written music), and it sounds like you are stuck on understanding chords. But there are other musicians who are exactly the opposite - they are very comfortable thinking in terms of chords, but they don't know how to read standard notation. (In fact guitarists are often like that!) Even when ...


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This is a little bit like "Do I need to learn the alphabet in order to speak English?". The answer is no, with a but. It is possible to mechanically learn to play the piano with no theory, but it's severely limiting. Theory gives you the language to understand music, to talk about playing with others, to read music and to talk about it with others. ...


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Learning piece after piece will work but you'll be a lot quicker doing that with understanding. With the one piece at a time approach, you'll be considering everything in that piece in isolation. With theory knowledge, you'll see patterns emerge in new pieces, and they will help you learn quicker. Not only that, but you'll be able to understand what's ...


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No , but , if you want to become a well rounded Pianist , then knowing music theory, from rudiments of music to Harmony , you can enjoy making music and better understand the structure of music and how it flows from beginning to end. The chords are the words in music. To study music theory should make it easier to you to understand the patterns in the music ...


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First, I am curious to know what it is about music theory you find confusing and why you think there is no point to it. Also, are you taking lessons and is your teacher insisting you learn theory? Maybe you can comment on those things. In a nutshell, no one HAS to learn music theory to learn how to play an instrument. There are literally millions of people ...


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Stagger the notes, so play them as an arpeggio, one after the other, top to bottom (as the arrow shows direction).


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There is a big gap from a beginner's sight-reading to an experienced musician's sight-reading. Sight-reading consists of reading the notes, the intervals, rhythm patterns, scale patterns, chords patterns, broken chord patterns, key signatures, tempo indications, articulations, dynamics and any other indications that might appear in the sheet music. The ...


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With experience, and when a piece lies within your comfort zone, you read the patterns. Like 'look and say' in reading a book. When an unfamiliar pattern presents itself, you may have to stop and look at it in a more analytical way. There's another stage, particularly when playing non-classical (for want of a better term) music like a song copy or a lead ...


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On the piano: In chordal passages I think it's the shapes of the chords I take in. Like which inversion. If the note-heads are all on the same side of the stem it's going to be a simple chord. If one of the note-heads is on a different side from the others, its position on the stem tells me it's going to be this type of chord, or this type. In fast ...


8

Perhaps both are good, and there are other options. How one reads is instrument dependent. On the guitar for example we eventually learn to read chords. This can pose a problem for beginners as they feel like they need to stop at the chord and climb up it, reading each note one by one and finding it. In fact this is not a good way to read chords. One is ...


3

This is not wrong, and it may be individually better for a singer or violinist. But: Identifying the notes, realizing their position in the staff, their function in the scale, their value, position and function in the chords, recognizing motifs, Melodic patterns, sequences, keys ... everything is helpful, useful, everything makes sense, also the interval ...


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We get to a point where we do NOT look at a dot, think 'that's a D', then find it on the instrument. And it could be any instrument. We often see how many lines or spaces (or combinations thereof) separate notes, and play accordingly. Sometimes we even second guess where we think the tune may go, and stab at that note. There are many tricks we use, and ...


1

My recommendation is to read as many notes as possible and practice it this way if you are beginner specifically. You can get away reading a few intervals but if one is wrong the others automatically become wrong, so avoid it as much as possible. In short: Read the notes, read the intervals to get by only.


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I don't think this is wrong at all; my sight reading is a mixture of these components, as well. The fact is that part of sight reading is based on common patterns. This is one of the many reasons why we work on scales and arpeggios and the like: when we encounter them while sight reading, we can call upon that ingrained memory to easily perform the task. ...


3

It is called a guide or courtesy accidental. It is not required since the C# accidental in bar 3 automatically cancels at the end of the bar but sometimes composers, arrangers or copyists put them in to remind the player the accidental is canceled. It is typically done in the bar immediately following the bar with the accidental though, not as often 2 bars ...


2

Acciaccatura has been covered. It has no real length value of its own - hence it's written using a small dot. It doesn't count towards the (already) 4 beats in that bar. The quavers are written as a separate voice, with their stems going in a different direction to show that. Imagine one instrument playing the up stems, and another the downstems. It would ...


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The small notehead with the eighth-note tail and slashed stem is a type of grace note named an acciaccatura, a crushed note, one you squeeze in just before the following note, which still occurs on the beat. In the second highlighted bar, on the second beat you play C and E quarter notes, and also play the eighth notes B then A. The notation with sticks up/...


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Welcome :-) A grace note. Not sure what's going on there, so I leave that one for others who may provide a much better answer. Looks like an additional voice, as indicated by the notes being drawn "upside down" compared to the other notes.


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welcome to the community. The G7 bit is not a measure but the end bit of a measure. This is called anacrusis. So the first measure is the CΔ one. As for the measure with the 3 quarter notes, the "3" number indicates that the duration of those notes is shorter so that the available duration, that of 2 quarter notes, is shared by the 3 notes enclosed. That ...


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The first measure is called a pickup measure. The music stars on the fourth beat, so the music would start with rests. Sometimes people will put the rests in, other times (as here) they will leave them out. This is also known as an 'anacrusis'. The quarter notes in the third bar are 'triplets' (three notes in the space of two) recognizable from the '3' with ...


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I am going to provide a counter opinion to the two already-posted answers. Based on the printing, and the presence of chord symbols on the line below, I am confident that this is a jazz piece, right? In that case two different considerations apply. Firstly you certainly do not want to be counting in even quavers "1 & 2 & ". Secondly, and I feel more ...


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In a measure of 4/4 time there are four beats. A whole note in that same measure calls for a count of four beats. A half note calls for a count of two beats, half the number of beats called for in a whole note. A quarter note calls for one beat, 1/4 the number of beats that are called for in a whole note. If a quarter note were to be renamed a whole note, we ...


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Go back in history, and you'll discover the breve. The word means short, but it's actually worth eight crotchets (quarter notes). Most music has a pulse to it - the part that one taps one's foot to, the heartbeat. The most common note to write for this amount of time has become the crotchet. In the most common time signature - 4/4 - that means there are ...


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In theory you would divide a crotchet into twelfths. Then there are 12 for the crotchet, 4 for each triplet quaver, 3 for each semiquaver, and 18 for the dotted crotchet. In practice this is unworkable at any reasonable speed. Like RishiNandha_M I usually count in quavers as 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & etc, but it works better for me if I drop counting ...


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