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7

Firstly, piano players would much prefer 8va/8vb (even over a long stretch) to an octave clef. Octave clefs are not for piano. However, that octave of Cs in the bass is not too many leger lines to be written without 8vb, (the interval of an octave is quite recognisable). So your third option would be fine if you got rid of the octave clef - either have 5 ...


6

TL;DR Sample 3 is the way to go. It's fine to change clefs, and no "over" indication is needed. This is clearly illustrated in a passage from Beethoven's "Pathetique" sonata (Op. 13, mm. 49–56). The right hand repeatedly crosses over the left, indicated only by clef changes in the right-hand part. (Image source: IMSLP) 1. What is the ...


9

Of the solutions you suggest the third solution is the best, particularly as it makes it clear that you want a half note. There are other, even better solutions (see the answer by @ElementsinSpace). No pianist would have any trouble understanding what you mean. There's absolutely no need to add "over" and "L.H." is probably superfluous as ...


2

A lead sheet is the bare bones of a song. The top piece is a lead sheet. It is made up from the single notes providing the melody, while the l.h. part is just not there. That's due to the chords being written out as the song progresses, for a chordal instrument (usually piano or guitar) to provide the backing. That could be played as full chords, dyads/...


5

In the first lead sheet, you play the melody with one hand and the chords/harmony with the other. (In fact, it's looser than this. For example, I often divide chords between the two hands while also playing the melody. Or I play a walking bass line rather than chords. In other words, you make up your own way of playing the song.) The second example is not a ...


4

This is closely related to this question about vibrato in jazz violin. The simple answer is, markings related to vibrato are few because it is usually an integral part of the stylistic conventions of a genre. Throughout history and across cultures, every genre uses or omits vibrato in stylistically significant ways. In bel canto or in modern classical ...


1

The Dolmetsch Musical Symbols guide lists the = symbol, but not ≡, but for = it says this: a symbol found above note heads in The Bird Fancyer's Delight which is explained in the original publication thus: "The marks & rules for graceing are these Viz. a close shake thus =" I expect that you'd perform = similarly to ≡


7

The piece is for (pipe) organ. Organs generally have more than one keyboard - one or more for the hands (manuals) and one for the feet. See for example this page at organtutor.byu.edu. These different keyboards are linked to various stops. Different stops control different sounds. The selection of stops (and assignment of particular notes to particular ...


2

Piano player only plays the lower two lines - the top line is what the singer sings.


2

I don't know whether it's possible to shorten the code you have provided (I doubt it but perhaps someone will know a way). However you could use \set tieWaitForNote = ##t to a good effect here. When it is set to ##t, each note with tie waits for the next occurrence of the same note and ties it with that. So your snippet could be rewritten like this: \...


3

Quick, general answer: Because chromatic notes and chords are a thing. A very commonly-used thing. You don't have to stay in the scale. Longer answer, more specific to this instance: You have fallen into the trap of assuming that the 'Natural minor' scale is the ONLY form of minor scale. Until quite recently, standard teaching was that the Harmonic minor ...


2

Your melody's inherrent harmony (the one you imagine when you hear it) is C F | G C | a d | E a (lowercase indicates minor chord) This is more natural than having e a in the end, which would not have nearly as strong of a gravity towards the final note. You can also try A d | E a (i.e. using c# in bar 3), it will get yet a different feel, and whoa, you'll ...


1

As I understand it, you want to create a four-bar ostinato that repeats throughout the piece. It just so happens that the pattern contains some repetition, in an A A B B pattern. You indicated that you're already using a sign to indicate repeating measure A in the next measure. Hopefully you mean this: You can also use a multi-measure repeat sign like this: ...


6

This line helps the eye track the melody across different clefs, instruments, or voices. Here indicates the melody moving from the high voice in the bass clef to the low voice in the tenor clef. In piano scores, the marking is intended to guide phrasing. For example, this melody bit should probably be "brought out" - it is unlikely that the ...


3

I'm a newbie at this stuff but I'll take a crack at explaining why it sounds good to me. I think we can simplify the melody by reducing the n,n+1,n+2,n eighth notes (like C D E C) patterns to the first note n and removing the trailing eighth notes; brief or unrepeated notes make less of an impression. So then we're left with C F|B E|A D|G# A. We can break ...


23

You started in key C major, and you've modulated into key Am, its relative minor. True, there's no G♯ note in key C major, but key A minor has three slightly different incarnations, when written in scalar form, two of which actually do have that G♯. Those notes just before the last note, A, all work with the chord E, which most times in music will lead to A. ...


39

I would argue that your melody may not be in C major at all. C major and A natural minor share the same pitches, and your melody is constructed precisely in such a way that it can exist both in C major and in A minor! You might think, "Well, the first measure emphasizes C and E, which are both members of the C-major tonic triad." But they're also ...


11

Although A minor does not natively include G#, it is common practice to use G#, because it is the leading tone in A minor (and major). That is, it "leads" the ear to A, just as you've described. This idea is also discussed in When to deviate from scale? Technically, what you've composed is called a sequence, a pattern of sounds that is repeated on ...


3

Easiest way I can think of is to simply treat your instrumental break as the third verse. You could simply add "instrumental" underneath the lyrics for the second verse. Unless I am mistaken, the chords are the same. This is a simple solution, and it shows to the musicians that the form of the solo break is identical to the verse.


5

Hypothetical Italian repeat markings answer: If and only if codas, segnos, etc. were the only tools at one's disposal, I would suggest D.C. al Coda ("Da Capo al Coda"; roughly "from the head (beginning) to the tail (ending)" in measure 17, which jumps the piece to the beginning. This could also be accomplished with "D.S. al Coda&...


10

You can use DS, DSS, coda, double coda but why? The song as is is only 27 bars. Eliminating a road map would add 16 bars (an extra verse and chorus if I’m reading it right) and avoid any possible confusion of missed signs, repeats or repeat endings. Write it out from top to bottom, you’re better off, especially if others will be sight reading the song. Plus, ...


3

You can notate it this way: Verse First ending, marked "to chorus" Jump over instrumental section Chorus, with D.C. Second verse Second ending leads into instrumental, then chorus End


10

Phrase marks here rather than slurs. (How would you slur the first four notes?)Yes, in this case where the melody moves between the staves, the phrase applies to the whole melody. But you'd phrase the entire melody that way whether the phrase mark was there or not. But don't try to dissect this sort of writing too minutely. How shall we play those last ...


5

The slurs in this case are serving as phrase markings; notice that they correspond to the punctuation of the lyrics. They also indicate legato playing, and they are intended to apply to both hands. In measures 5 and 6 in particular, the idea is to keep a legato connection of the melody as its notes shift between hands. This arrangement of the song employs a &...


1

'How did they know?' Maybe they didn't ! Notice a couple of things. The sequence moves in 4ths, which is a common enough way. Think ii-V-I, used a lot in jazz, but also in lots of other music. The ii sounds like it wants to go to V (1 4th up), which then wants to go to I (another 4th up). So the 4th bar (Fmaj7) would move naturally to B&flat(maj7), and ...


3

You're looking at what is called a "lead sheet". The intention is to provide the melody and basic harmony (chords) of a song. The chords are derived from the originally published song, or, in some cases, the song was composed initially as simply a set of chords with a melody. For example, Miles Davis's "So What" and John Coltrane's "...


3

Probably because the composer wrote that chord when the music was composed. He probably wanted that particular sound or feel related to the melody. So whoever published the sheet music has seen the original music and therefore seen what chords the composer wrote in relation to the melodic line. The colour of the melodic line is closely connected to the ...


6

I've often wondered why this causes confusion. If the accidental was on a note other than a grace note or an ornament you would not think twice would you; you would know that it still applies. However because its on an ornament a doubt arises. I think that this is because we tend to view ornaments and grace notes as less significant because they are ...


3

Great question! Whilst an acciaccatura generally plays a note a semitone higher/lower than the target note, that would sound odd here, if the target was in fact B♮. Making the final 'chord' B♮ with B♭. As you say, B♮ isn't part of the designated chord, so odd it would be. Th slur (or is it in fact a tie?) is often (but not always) part of the sign, but here, ...


2

The answers already here are great. Forgive me if this is covering something you're already on top of, but let me take it back to the very first step. So time signature ("meter") is all about how beats are grouped together. That assumes that there are beats. Listen to this: This shakuhachi performance is "...


3

First of all, don't listen to songs by watching videos: your mind is concentrating more on the pictures than the sound. Close your eyes and listen! Secondly, you need to train your ears (and body) to distinguish between 4/4 and other time signatures, especially 3/4 and 5/4. It would be best to listen to unambiguous examples of songs in these time signatures ...


1

The majority of most types of music puts extra emphasis on beat 1. Knowing where beat 1 is will make the job easier. So listen to uncomplicated pop songs, and sing songs that you already know. Tap just on the most emphasised note each time it occurs. That will be your 1. In songs, there is often an important word for that beat 1. Then tap along with the ...


3

As like when you learned to read and write, you need a great deal of exposition to scores and sheet music to read it well after a time. If you don't read a single note on staff, you can discover the mechanics even on wikipedia. There's plenty YouTube videos on this. It's is fairly easy and straightforward system - but can escalate rapidly to complexity on ...


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