New answers tagged

1

In addition to the existing answers, I would just add that in abcjs you can use !style=x! to change the note head. I normally create a shortcut, with k being the most similar to x. You can also use the chord marks to draw the notes together. In the header: U: k = !style=x! Usage in the body: kB, | [kB,C]4 |] results in X: 1 M: C U: k = !style=x! K: C kB, | [...


2

Many editors do not mark their emendations; often one must compare a given text with an "urtext" or "original edition" (not necessarily the same) or even a facsimile of the composer's notebook. In "good" editorial work, the editor's changes may be marked (an accidental enclosed in brackets rather than parentheses) or a dotted ...


5

First of all, this is not a very good piece of music. It's just a dry and boring transcription of the main theme played at a slow tempo. It's not worth spending more energy worrying about technique than the arranger spent writing it. That being said, many people are overly obsessed with the sostenuto (middle) pedal, and with doing weird hand gymnastics to ...


1

Every single note in the excerpt is playable even if both your hands only span an octave each. I'd have to go with my left-hand pinky and middle finger for the whole notes in the bass clef of Bar 12, then figure out the bass-clef E flat, F, and G with my left-hand pointer finger and thumb. I'd play the D flat above Middle C in the lower staff of Bar 12 with ...


9

You are correct for the first measure. Use fingers 5 and 2 to hold the chord, and use your left-hand thumb for the Eb, F, and G. Then use your right-hand thumb for the Db. In the second measure play all but the final C with your right hand, and pick up the C with your left. There are three voices in total (or four, if you count the bass chords as two voices):...


5

This is where the middle pedal comes out to play. Sostenuto will hold the semibreves, leaving your hands free for everything else. The D♭ itself - I'd be playing that with rh thumb, in order to play the lh A♭ and E♭ at the beginning of bar 13. Hold those with the sostenuto, freeing lh for the rest of the bar. No middle pedal? Then the sustain will do at a ...


5

There is some logic behind how we are taught to read and relate what we read to the positions on the guitar. Most good method systems in classical or modern guitar, e.g. Carcassi, Mel Bay, Levitt, just to name a few, focus lessons on specific patterns and positions. Those are drilled for years until they are in muscle memory, and the mind immediately ...


1

Personally, I haven't learned classical guitar technique. But I understand it works with formal positions. When you learn the positions, the fingering and fret/string choices are supposed to become intuitive. I imagine that "intuitive" sense of fret/string fingering only holds up when the music is in the classical style, when the music is based on ...


10

In a word, no! You'll start to find your way round, and realise that certain positions are better than others. It also depends on the sound you want. Playing up the 'board on higher frets and lower strings will give yo a different sound than playing exactly the same notes lower, on higher (thus thinner) strings. At any given place, you can encompass two ...


0

Any accidental - usually a sharp, flat or natural which is contrary to the key signature - will relate to that note , at that pitch only, for the rest of that bar, unless cancelled by a subsequent accidental referring to that same note.


5

Smaller notehead meaning The smaller notehead here means that the editor is uncertain, based on the sources consulted, whether the note is authentic -- that is, intended by Mozart -- or not. More specifically, the editor either believes: The note is should be played, so has been added, but cannot be confirmed; or The note is questionable, but the performer ...


0

You are in the first position and there is no duplicate of notes in the first position with the exception of the B on the 4th fret of the G string and the corresponding open string. It is not enough to ask "what F do I play", you also want to understand which octave you are in. While there may be 3 F's in the first position they are each a ...


1

As there are eighth notes through out the piece you have to play each note right there where its written. To hold the whole notes you need a sustain pedal, or you can simply ignore the lower octave. Like Tim says in a comment, this piece seems to be quite difficult for a beginner - especially the rhythmical challenge of triplets and 8th notes. You can make ...


1

Notes that are aligned vertically (on the same staff or system of staves) are to be played simultaneously. If the distance between the notes is greater than you are able to span with your hand, play the lower note first and then as quickly as possible play the upper note or notes. Use of the pedal as described by ttw can help with this. Measures 1 through ...


1

The whole notes in the bass clef are just held. In the second section, it's best to think of the bass clef as two essentially independent lines. The upper notes are played with one finger and the lower with another. At measure 11, the whole notes are played and held with the sustain pedal on a piano. If no sustain is available, the notes are played and let ...


0

This answer may have a few points beyond facts which may be viewed as controversial, I hope positive enthusiasm is used. Sheet music should be a must. Your simply choosing to limit yourself, fairly predictably to only ever playing existing music, and being solely reliant on these "apps" developers/designers to learn music. Till lately music always ...


1

Several points occur with this concept. It's basically learning by rote. When a parrot asks 'Who's a pretty boy then?' it obviously can say it, but hasn't a clue what it means (for most parrots, that is...) and learning a piece this way only gives you that piece - no more. Nothing to help learn the next piece, nothing to build on. In the long term, quite ...


1

Since your last edit, your question went from: Should piano teachers move away from sheet music and sight reading and instead use new simpler music-reading methods To: Should sight-reading be emphasized less for piano instruction with new developments in technology I can't give you an answer for the first one, but I can give you my point of view for the ...


0

The traditional music notation is more than piano roll, tabs or other graphic notations. It is an art by it self. I agree that many beginners struggle by reading sheet music and many wouldn’t give up if there were a better mix of reading scores and improvising, playing block chords, arpeggios and Alberti basses. On one hand there are too many sheet readers ...


2

Here's a simplistic answer. Babies first learn to speak by imitating. In some societies, this all that is ever needed. No knowledge of reading, writing or grammar is required. Kids brought up in a musical family, absorb music in the same way. For kids who are not so lucky, any and all online music resources are a boon. Most children learn to read and write. ...


0

Answering directly, there are 3 F notes in that music. Since the whole exercise is in first position, open, 1st, 2nd, 3rd 4th and for the very highest note, A, the 5th fret are used. There is only one place on guitar for the lowest F - the second note shown - and that is 6th string, 1st fret. The F in the bottom space of the stave is on 4th string, 3rd fret, ...


1

Because these exercises are to be played entirely in first position, each F indicated has only one option. The lowest F, for example (the second note of the first exercise), can only be played on the first fret of the 6th string. Here's a chart that may be helpful: © 1998, 2015 Jeffrey L Anvinson. Used by permission. Complete chart is available at: http://...


4

Many of the above answers have well specified the necessity of sheet music. In simple terms, I would put it this way: Through notations, unlike in synthesia videos where the note length, crescendos, diminuendos, and ritardandos I.e. increasing the intensity of sound, decreasing intensity of sound, slowing down, and so many other notations are not available, ...


12

...An analogy I've considered for years is this: Using sheet music is like reading Latin, converting it to English in your head, then playing English on the piano. Using videos like the one I posted is like reading English and playing English, and you also get to see which fingers to use... This just sounds like a rant and resistance to learning to read ...


12

A few bad things Guess what? The person who played on that video that had to get it from somewhere. From where? From the sheet music of course! Those videos are for keyboards where all the notes are laid out in a row. Let's see how it works for a clarinet or violin! If pianists are the only ones who don't play from sheet music, how will they ever play with ...


15

Every musician knows that sheet music can be frustrating at first, but almost everyone has spent quite some time learning it. I've met literally dozens of people (students, fellow musicians etc) that have asked the exact same question: "Why isn't there a simpler way of notating music? Ableton's piano roll works for me! Synthesia works for me!" ...


27

Using sheet music is like reading Latin, converting it to English in your head, then playing English on the piano. Well, you probably never really translated Latin, at least not in a good way. Despite its naming, music notation is not just about notes. As much as writing is not just about words. I was able to memorize and learn the proper fingering for ...


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