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7

Definitely a trill. A forward slash would be much taller, narrower and more slanted. Certain fonts leave the tail and the cross off the 't' almost entirely, especially when italic and bold. Below is a comparison of '/r' and 'tr' in a more standard, modern font (on the left) and an older, less common font (on the right).


40

This is actually tr, the notation for "trill," an embellishment (or ornament) on a note where you rapidly alternate between the main pitch and an adjacent pitch. There are many different types of trills; the style of music (and perhaps editorial notes) will clarify exactly which type is intended. You can check out more in the Wikipedia article.


0

Traditional classical guitar methods (e.g. Carcassi) teach one to let the open strings ring in resonance with the notes played to increase overall volume and improve the tone of the guitar. This is not the same thing as stopping a plucked note once the sheet music indicates that its time is over. As Tim's comment points out this is somewhat of a personal ...


1

Neil Meyer cites a humorous canon for voices by Mozart. Another is Difficile lectu, K559. This is a canon for 3 voices. The text appears to be Latin --- it consists of Latin words, but as far as I can see those words make no sense together except that "difficile lectu" means "difficult to read". The Latin in fact makes puns on some rude words in German and ...


3

This is indeed an old sign for a crotchet/quarter rest. Here for comparison is a bar from Mozart's Fantasia in c minor, K475, published in Vienna by Artaria:


1

I've edited again and added a critique near the bottom of this answer: I figured that since I wrote this comment as an answer that I would give an answer as well. As you have probably already seen from the many responses, there are seven pitches in the diatonic scale. This has historically led to the current way of writing music. For example, accidentals ...


1

For me it seems pretty obvious that you should be looking at an ISMN. I'm not going into the SEO aspects of an ISMN; that would be a different question in a different Exchange site. An extract from the ISMN manual at https://www.ismn-international.org/files/Web_ISMN_Users_Manual_2016.pdf; Each constituent part of a publication which is separately ...


6

The first bar could be written like this. The extra C just establishes that the melody starts on that note.


5

On the face of it, it does appear to be rather a silly thing to write! Play one note for only one beat, while holding that exact same note for four! In fact, the bass clef in that bar could have been written the same way - or the treble notes written in a similar way to the bass clef notes. Makes more sense! However... a lot of piano music is written like ...


1

This exercise is training the isolation of fingers by fixing the thumb and index of the right hand or the thumb and pinky finger of the left hand playing whole notes. The whole note and the first crotchet are played at the same time (1.beat) and the whole note is held while the successing crotchet are played. So, you are right, they are not added, the ...


4

The C in the bar you underlined should be held for 4 beats while playing the other notes for one beat each.


1

A small addition to MattPutnam's answer: rfz is seen a fair bit in the music of Elgar. The difference between rfz and sfz is that sfz is a more percussive hit. rfz was once described to me as like squeezing toothpaste out of a tube - it is played with much less attack than sfz, though equally strongly. (Of course, on percussive instruments like the piano ...


28

mp and mf are mezzo-piano and mezzo-forte, respectively. Mezzo means "middle" or "medium", and so they're more towards the middle than piano and forte. So from softest to loudest, we have pp (pianissimo), p, mp, mf, f, and ff (fortissimo). More "p"s or "f"s are technically nonstandard, but are nevertheless used quite a lot. sf or sfz is sforzando, a sudden ...


0

(Disregarding the de-tuning of the guitar, and the deliberately dissonant intro ... ) Although the harmony (E/G/A - to me these chords sound like just root and fifth, I don't for instance hear a G# on the E chord, so that means all the notes are in E minor - referring to this performance) is pretty clearly E minor, the real giveaway is the melody, which so ...


2

The start of the movement has some hand crossings that are explicitly marked with "s" and "d" (sinistra and destra) which are repeated later on. Looking at the bars after the hand crossing, the each hand continues to play the same note patterns, but uncrossed. So it is clear enough what the composer intended. If you can produce the same result without ...


0

Always play the way that is better, convenient and more comfortable to you. Everything else is chewing gum for the brain or as Rosie says: show off. btw: Cross crawl is not just nonsense! Look at Mozart playing piano in the movie Amadeus. It is good training to integrate the working of both brain hemispheres: Practical Guide to Natural Vision Improvemen


3

I'd say that provided you can play the semiquavers/16ths in your left hand smoothly, and keep them running smoothly in that 3rd system's 1st bar as you pass them from your left hand to your right, go for it. There are several moments in piano works, I've found, where the notation suggests cross hands, but you can avoid it by suitably assigning notes to ...


1

Lets keep it simple and forget the fact its tuned down half a step. The song is a II IV V progression. with the II chord acting as a kind of tritone substitution / secondary dominant chords. The song, however, is E Dorain, hence the Em7#9 chord is the prominent chord. E Dorain is especially prominent in the solo and he also uses the tritone as a passing ...


3

The length of a beat depends on tempo, and tempo depends on the style and feeling that's wanted. Or the other way around - whatever beat length you set, it sets a tempo and a feeling. If your beat is one second long, then you get 60 of them per minute, and the tempo is 60 beats per minute. Try different tempos and see what you like.


3

At 120 BPM (beats per minute), which is a typical pop song tempo, every beat lasts half a second. Divide 60 by the BPM to get the length of a beat at other tempos. You can use the Google metronome to try out tempos expressed in BPM. if I understand your explanation correctly, you can set the timing of the notes and rests in tenths of a second. This is the ...


4

The three notes you mentioned (A/A#/B) could be written A/Bb/Cb. And, yes, music for piano that is harmonically adventurous has chords like that in it all the time. Every note can be written several ways. C = B#, Dbb C# = Db, B## D = C##, Ebb etc. When writing music that is not strictly tonal, the rules about how to show tonality are irrelevant. Use the ...


3

I’m not sure what instrument could possibly do this, perhaps a piano with five or more people sitting at it, but I would just put a rhythm slash with a note saying “play all the notes available over the range of the instrument.” If you just want a very dense tone cluster, then two separate chord shapes with the appropriate accidental next to each other ...


3

Latin pop music is to some extent based on interlocking patterns in the rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, 47,275 drums). The piano part is (in some styles) called a montuno (so is the loud parts of some pieces too). The montuno is generally two measures (or 8 beats depending on how the composer chose the notation) based on another pattern called the clave....


9

Yes, you're right that in many genres of music pianists and guitarists have to spontaneously come up with parts based only on chord symbols (and hopefully also listening to other members of the band). This is called comping. Bass players typically also have to do this too; even if the bassline is written out in that piece that isn't always the case (and if ...


6

Pianists and guitarists in these styles are expected to be able to play from chord names and bass lines. If you cannot find an Fm6 in a heartbeat then this means more practice. As for the comping style, this varies between players and genres and is up to you. On the guitar it may be just four downstrokes per bar, a funky cross-rhythm in the style of Nile ...


3

A chord progression is a list of chords. A chord's voicing is the arrangement of notes within that chord. But you seem to be asking about something else, the rhythmic element of 'comping' in various styles. Yes, different comping styles for different musical styles. For a low-down blues you might simply play basic close-position chords 4-to-the-bar. In ...


1

I've only got Books IV to VI, so I only know from Lars Peter Schultz's answer that both clefs are treble. Bartok undoubtedly wants a sense of the two voices uniting in a unison. Without the dotted line a pianist might play the A and then raise his hand, leaving the left to finish the piece. In doing so he might even shorten the duration of the A, as if the ...


5

Normally such a line would mean that the connected notes belongs to the same melodic line. Sometimes a melodic line changes hands because of technical reasons making it difficult to play the line in one hand, usually because other things are also supposed to be played with that hand. Then the marking indicates where the melodic line is continuing. But here ...


3

The blue circled tie is likely a slur because the german text under it says "bass smooth and stately" and the slur reinforces the technique you should be following for the bass line of the piece. the red circled tie is a slur from the a to the g, including the stemmed down f. the yellow circled section: - first tie is a slur from the bass note to the f so ...


8

It is music original written for organ where you have more than one manual plus pedals. Busoni made piano editions of many of Bach's organ pieces and your image shows Busoni's piano version. Maybe it can help to understand the voices in the music by looking at Bach's original and thereby understand what is going on. Below is an image from Bach's handwriting ...


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