16

from a terminal on your mac or linux box: pip install python-ly ly musicxml myscore.ly > myscore.musicxml more information on ly: http://python-ly.readthedocs.io/en/latest/command.html#commands When I read that the state of the art workflow for this involves rendering your score to PDF and then scanning back in with music OCR, I kind of blew milk out ...


14

You're right. There's no effect when transposing by a perfect unison. But it does make sense to have the option of transposing by an augmented unison (eg. Ab major to A Major) or a diminished unison (eg. B major to Bb Major). I guess the perfect unison option is simply there because you have perfect, diminished and augmented transpose options for each ...


7

First of all, there is no absolute standard for drum notation, or percussion notation in general. The rule of thumb (usually) is: the position in the staff is based on (general importance order): height of the limb that is used to play it (arms on top, legs on bottom); physical position of the instrument on a "standard" set; pitch of the ...


6

One thing to understand here is that MIDI data does not actually contain any notation. (Note the lack of key signature on your import.) So what is happening here is Sibelius is interpreting your notation as a bunch of pitches and durations on a timeline and outputting that data in MIDI format so it can be easily played back on a synthesizer or sequencer. If ...


6

In Sibelius, you can use up to four separate voices on a single staff. The stems on notes for voices 1 and 3 point upward, while those for voices 2 and 4 point downward. The four voices are accessible via the numbered buttons labeled 1–4 and "All" at the bottom of the keypad menu. The "all" button selects all voices which are currently in use in the selected ...


6

Turn on View: Handles. You'll see a marker just past the end of the last stave. Drag it across. You can do this without making the handle visible, once you know where it is. The other bars in that line will re-size to accommodate the shorter line length. If you want just one bar compressed, Shift-Alt-LeftArrow and Shift-Alt-RightArrow will compress or ...


5

There is an Ornament Playback Plugin for Sibelius. You can select options for inverted and chromatic ornaments. Information about this plugin, including how to find it, can be found at this webpage. UPDATE: the picture below shows where the Ornament Playback Plugin can be found in the Play tab of the ribbon (this is in the latest version, Sibelius 7): The ...


5

At the current point of time, the answer boils down to "no" for practical purposes. Try going via Midi instead. Unfamiliarity with the LilyPond notation, particularly if you already have access to a score for modification, can be cured by looking in the manual. Graphical editors don't magically teach you everything either. There is the note editor Denemo ...


5

The only "rule" is that the notation should be as clear as possible. In the Debussy example, it's very clear that there's one monophonic line that meanders across both staffs (and therefore, both hands). Omitting the rests helps clarify the line a little bit. You might also see examples where a second voice within one staff starts midway through the bar, but ...


5

Try voice 2 for bass drum and voice 1 for hihat. The snap above is from my copy of Sibelius 7


4

My sense is that I can never think of an example of a piece published in the main era of classical music hand engraving (1800-1960) that has a tie which continues into the first ending where the engraver did not also put the ending of the tie in the second ending (similarly for other elements that extend into the first ending such as crescendi; I would also ...


4

Well, that may be a literal word-for-word translation, but the French for "brass" is ALSO cuivre (or specifically, cuivre jaune). Brass, of course, is an alloy that contains copper at varying levels. The name for "the brass (instruments)" in French is les cuivres. As for the dial you are seeing, I am unable to find that on my copy of Sibelius 6, running ...


4

Your first upper note, the E (presuming that's treble clef) shouldn't have a dot. The dot is redundant to the tie (that's a tie and not a slur, right?) to the following eighth note E. Furthermore, if you really mean the pitches to have the durations they're lined up to have in the first example, that dotted quarter E not only shouldn't have a dot, it ...


4

The timpani one is easy: Modern timpani are tuned using foot pedals, so all you have to do is tune the drum up after striking it. It takes very little skill. The conga one is a little harder but still very typical. You can raise the pitch of a hand drum by pressing on the drum head, so to do a fall you start with the pitch raised and then let it fall after ...


4

Yes, when a musical phrase crosses staves it's conventional to leave out the extra rests. At present, in Sibelius at any rate, you just have to manually hide the unwanted rests. Here's what Gould has to say on the subject.


4

Brian already gave the right answer, I'll just add example screenshots from Sibelius 6. The upper voice with stems up has to be voice 1, and the lower voice with stems down has to be voice 2, or else the notes won't line up. This is with hi-hat in voice 2 (green), looks awful, and Reset Note Spacing won't help: And then the following is with hi-hat in voice ...


3

Certainly is! Just click after the end of the stave you want to change the length of. You can then move the last bar line of that stave, and so also move the whole stave. If you look at the picture below, you'll see a little purple square after the end of the second stave. This appears if you left-click after the end of that stave: Then, you select this ...


3

When using Sibelius7 (or 7.5) you can use the Filters function to select a group of similar objects (notes, rests, text etc.). This then allows you to perform the same action on all of these selected objects. The Filters functions are found on the Home tab (towards the right-hand side of the image below): I'll demonstrate how to use this feature with a ...


3

Use flip as necessary to get the stem direction. Move some of the notes sideways by applying an x-offset in the Inspector.


3

The only reason to indicate pedal in piano music is if you want pedal changes to be in exact spots and capturing certain harmonies. Otherwise, leave it to the pianist. If a student is playing your piece, the teacher will help the student to learn how to musically use the pedal. Professionals know how to make these decisions themselves. To put pedal markings ...


3

Sibelius uses this system. It's fine. But it's worth adding 'ride', 'crash', 'HH' etc above the first entry of each instrument. As @MattPutnam says, there are other systems. Don't normally use the alternative Ride and Crash positions several ledger lines above the stave. They're just so Sibelius can offer alternative sounds.


3

We call this an anacrusis; less formally, we just call it a "pick up." In short, a pick-up measure is one that takes place at the beginning of a work/section and is not the full value of the normal measure. We tend to treat them as "measure 0" and begin counting with measure 1 on the next downbeat. I haven't used Sibelius in a while, but somewhere in your ...


3

The main reason to use Open Source software is its longevity, in my opinion. After having to learn new programs when CorelDraw and Aperture were no longer maintained for Mac, I always try to find some Open Source alternative. Maybe it is not so good, but it will probably last much longer since anybody who has the skills and interest can maintain it. In ...


3

Unfortunately, in practice your objective works the other way round. The following applies only to NotePerformer, because I don't have any experience with Sibelius Sounds. The individual instruments are certainly realistic enough to be easily identifiable by ear, but the software doesn't simulate the full range of timbre and dynamics that a professional ...


3

This is almost exactly how it should be written. It will be clear to any pianist how to group it and which hand to play it with. If you want to be extra clear, you could mark it with "RH" for "Right hand". Here are the changes that should be made: Regarding the sixteenth rest, either: A. Remove it, or B. If the intention is that the ...


3

Voices The choice of what parts of the kit are given to which voice actually depends on the music. There are three standard choices for the voices: Linear, Cymbals & Drums, and Hands & Feet. (It is very unusual to see more than two voices.) A linear representation is where only one voice is used (with upward stems). This is best when only one ...


3

Use Voice 1 or 3 for stem-up notes, Voice 2 or 4 for stem-down ones. Don't 'flip' stems until there are notes in both Voices. Yes, if you enter the bass drum (voice 2) notes first, the stems will go up. Don't worry. When you put some hi-hat (voice 1) notes in, they'll flip automatically. If you've inadvertently reversed Voices 1 and 2, there's a quick ...


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